EGEON
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Proceed Solinus to procure my fall, Proceed, Solinus, to procure my fall,CE I.i.1
And by the doome of death end woes and all. And by the doom of death end woes and all.CE I.i.2
Yet this my comfort, when your words are done, Yet this my comfort: when your words are done,CE I.i.27
My woes end likewise with the euening Sonne. My woes end likewise with the evening sun.CE I.i.28
A heauier taske could not haue beene impos'd, A heavier task could not have been imposedCE I.i.32
Then I to speake my griefes vnspeakeable: Than I to speak my griefs unspeakable.CE I.i.33
Yet that the world may witnesse that my end Yet, that the world may witness that my endCE I.i.34
Was wrought by nature, not by vile offence, Was wrought by nature, not by vile offence,CE I.i.35
Ile vtter what my sorrow giues me leaue. I'll utter what my sorrow gives me leave.CE I.i.36
In Syracusa was I borne, and wedde In Syracusa was I born, and wedCE I.i.37
Vnto a woman, happy but for me, Unto a woman happy but for me,CE I.i.38
And by me; had not our hap beene bad: And by me, had not our hap been bad.CE I.i.39
With her I liu'd in ioy, our wealth increast With her I lived in joy, our wealth increasedCE I.i.40
By prosperous voyages I often made By prosperous voyages I often madeCE I.i.41
To Epidamium, till my factors death, To Epidamnum, till my factor's death,CE I.i.42
And he great care of goods at randone left, And the great care of goods at random left,CE I.i.43
Drew me from kinde embracements of my spouse; Drew me from kind embracements of my spouse,CE I.i.44
From whom my absence was not sixe moneths olde, From whom my absence was not six months oldCE I.i.45
Before her selfe (almost at fainting vnder Before herself, almost at fainting underCE I.i.46
The pleasing punishment that women beare) The pleasing punishment that women bear,CE I.i.47
Had made prouision for her following me, Had made provision for her following me,CE I.i.48
And soone, and safe, arriued where I was: And soon and safe arrived where I was.CE I.i.49
There had she not beene long, but she became There had she not been long but she becameCE I.i.50
A ioyfull mother of two goodly sonnes: A joyful mother of two goodly sons;CE I.i.51
And, which was strange, the one so like the other, And, which was strange, the one so like the otherCE I.i.52
As could not be distinguish'd but by names. As could not be distinguished but by names.CE I.i.53
That very howre, and in the selfe-same Inne, That very hour, and in the self-same inn,CE I.i.54
A meane woman was deliuered A mean woman was deliveredCE I.i.55
Of such a burthen Male, twins both alike: Of such a burden male, twins both alike.CE I.i.56
Those, for their parents were exceeding poore, Those, for their parents were exceeding poor,CE I.i.57
I bought, and brought vp to attend my sonnes. I bought, and brought up to attend my sons.CE I.i.58
My wife, not meanely prowd of two such boyes, My wife, not meanly proud of two such boys,CE I.i.59
Made daily motions for our home returne: Made daily motions for our home return.CE I.i.60
Vnwilling I agreed, alas, too soone Unwilling I agreed. Alas, too soonCE I.i.61
wee came aboord. We came aboard.CE I.i.62
A league from Epidamium had we saild A league from Epidamnum had we sailedCE I.i.63
Before the alwaies winde-obeying deepe Before the always wind-obeying deepCE I.i.64
Gaue any Tragicke Instance of our harme: Gave any tragic instance of our harm.CE I.i.65
But longer did we not retaine much hope; But longer did we not retain much hope,CE I.i.66
For what obscured light the heauens did grant, For what obscured light the heavens did grantCE I.i.67
Did but conuay vnto our fearefull mindes Did but convey unto our fearful mindsCE I.i.68
A doubtfull warrant of immediate death, A doubtful warrant of immediate death,CE I.i.69
Which though my selfe would gladly haue imbrac'd, Which though myself would gladly have embraced,CE I.i.70
Yet the incessant weepings of my wife, Yet the incessant weepings of my wife,CE I.i.71
Weeping before for what she saw must come, Weeping before for what she saw must come,CE I.i.72
And pitteous playnings of the prettie babes And piteous plainings of the pretty babes,CE I.i.73
That mourn'd for fashion, ignorant what to feare, That mourned for fashion, ignorant what to fear,CE I.i.74
Forst me to seeke delayes for them and me, Forced me to seek delays for them and me.CE I.i.75
And this it was: (for other meanes was none) And this it was – for other means was none – CE I.i.76
The Sailors sought for safety by our boate, The sailors sought for safety by our boat,CE I.i.77
And left the ship then sinking ripe to vs. And left the ship, then sinking-ripe, to us.CE I.i.78
My wife, more carefull for the latter borne, My wife, more careful for the latter-born,CE I.i.79
Had fastned him vnto a small spare Mast, Had fastened him unto a small spare mastCE I.i.80
Such as sea-faring men prouide for stormes: Such as seafaring men provide for storms.CE I.i.81
To him one of the other twins was bound, To him one of the other twins was bound,CE I.i.82
Whil'st I had beene like heedfull of the other. Whilst I had been like heedful of the other.CE I.i.83
The children thus dispos'd, my wife and I, The children thus disposed, my wife and I,CE I.i.84
Fixing our eyes on whom our care was fixt, Fixing our eyes on whom our care was fixed,CE I.i.85
Fastned our selues at eyther end the mast, Fastened ourselves at either end the mast,CE I.i.86
And floating straight, obedient to the streame, And floating straight, obedient to the stream,CE I.i.87
Was carried towards Corinth, as we thought. Was carried towards Corinth, as we thought.CE I.i.88
At length the sonne gazing vpon the earth, At length the sun, gazing upon the earth,CE I.i.89
Disperst those vapours that offended vs, Dispersed those vapours that offended us,CE I.i.90
And by the benefit of his wished light And by the benefit of his wished lightCE I.i.91
The seas waxt calme, and we discouered The seas waxed calm, and we discoveredCE I.i.92
Two shippes from farre, making amaine to vs: Two ships from far, making amain to us:CE I.i.93
Of Corinth that, of Epidarus this, Of Corinth that, of Epidaurus this.CE I.i.94
But ere they came, oh let me say no more, But ere they came – O, let me say no more.CE I.i.95
Gather the sequell by that went before. Gather the sequel by that went before!CE I.i.96
Oh had the gods done so, I had not now O, had the gods done so, I had not nowCE I.i.99
Worthily tearm'd them mercilesse to vs: Worthily termed them merciless to us;CE I.i.100
For ere the ships could meet by twice fiue leagues, For ere the ships could meet by twice five leaguesCE I.i.101
We were encountred by a mighty rocke, We were encountered by a mighty rock,CE I.i.102
Which being violently borne vp, Which being violently borne upon,CE I.i.103
Our helpefull ship was splitted in the midst; Our helpful ship was splitted in the midst;CE I.i.104
So that in this vniust diuorce of vs, So that in this unjust divorce of usCE I.i.105
Fortune had left to both of vs alike, Fortune had left to both of us alikeCE I.i.106
What to delight in, what to sorrow for, What to delight in, what to sorrow for.CE I.i.107
Her part, poore soule, seeming as burdened Her part, poor soul, seeming as burdenedCE I.i.108
With lesser waight, but not with lesser woe, With lesser weight but not with lesser woe,CE I.i.109
Was carried with more speed before the winde, Was carried with more speed before the wind,CE I.i.110
And in our sight they three were taken vp And in our sight they three were taken upCE I.i.111
By Fishermen of Corinth, as we thought. By fishermen of Corinth, as we thought.CE I.i.112
At length another ship had seiz'd on vs, At length another ship had seized on us,CE I.i.113
And knowing whom it was their hap to saue, And knowing whom it was their hap to saveCE I.i.114
Gaue healthfull welcome to their ship-wrackt guests, Gave healthful welcome to their shipwrecked guests,CE I.i.115
And would haue reft the Fishers of their prey, And would have reft the fishers of their preyCE I.i.116
Had not their backe beene very slow of saile; Had not their bark been very slow of sail;CE I.i.117
And therefore homeward did they bend their course. And therefore homeward did they bend their course.CE I.i.118
Thus haue you heard me seuer'd from my blisse, Thus have you heard me severed from my bliss,CE I.i.119
That by misfortunes was my life prolong'd, That by misfortunes was my life prolongedCE I.i.120
To tell sad stories of my owne mishaps. To tell sad stories of my own mishaps.CE I.i.121
My yongest boy, and yet my eldest care, My youngest boy, and yet my eldest care,CE I.i.125
At eighteene yeeres became inquisitiue At eighteen years became inquisitiveCE I.i.126
After his brother; and importun'd me After his brother, and importuned meCE I.i.127
That his attendant, so his case was like, That his attendant, so his case was like,CE I.i.128
Reft of his brother, but retain'd his name, Reft of his brother, but retained his name,CE I.i.129
Might beare him company in the quest of him: Might bear him company in the quest of him;CE I.i.130
Whom whil'st I laboured of a loue to see, Whom whilst I laboured of a love to see,CE I.i.131
I hazarded the losse of whom I lou'd. I hazarded the loss of whom I loved.CE I.i.132
Fiue Sommers haue I spent in farthest Greece, Five summers have I spent in farthest Greece,CE I.i.133
Roming cleane through the bounds of Asia, Roaming clean through the bounds of Asia,CE I.i.134
And coasting homeward, came to Ephesus: And coasting homeward came to Ephesus,CE I.i.135
Hopelesse to finde, yet loth to leaue vnsought Hopeless to find, yet loath to leave unsoughtCE I.i.136
Or that, or any place that harbours men: Or that or any place that harbours men.CE I.i.137
But heere must end the story of my life, But here must end the story of my life,CE I.i.138
And happy were I in my timelie death, And happy were I in my timely deathCE I.i.139
Could all my trauells warrant me they liue. Could all my travels warrant me they live.CE I.i.140
Hopelesse and helpelesse doth Egean wend, Hopeless and helpless doth Egeon wend,CE I.i.158
But to procrastinate his liuelesse end.But to procrastinate his lifeless end.CE I.i.159
Vnlesse the feare of death doth make me dote, Unless the fear of death doth make me dote,CE V.i.195
I see my sonne Antipholus and Dromio. I see my son Antipholus, and Dromio.CE V.i.196
Most mighty Duke, vouchsafe me speak a word: Most mighty Duke, vouchsafe me speak a word.CE V.i.283
Haply I see a friend will saue my life, Haply I see a friend will save my lifeCE V.i.284
And pay the sum that may deliuer me. And pay the sum that may deliver me.CE V.i.285
Is not your name sir call'd Antipholus? Is not your name, sir, called Antipholus?CE V.i.287
And is not that your bondman Dromio? And is not that your bondman Dromio?CE V.i.288
I am sure you both of you remember me. I am sure you both of you remember me.CE V.i.292
Why looke you strange on me? you know me well. Why look you strange on me? You know me well.CE V.i.296
Oh! griefe hath chang'd me since you saw me last, O, grief hath changed me since you saw me last,CE V.i.298
And carefull houres with times deformed hand, And careful hours with time's deformed handCE V.i.299
Haue written strange defeatures in my face: Have written strange defeatures in my face.CE V.i.300
But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice? But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice?CE V.i.301
Dromio, nor thou? Dromio, nor thou?CE V.i.303
I am sure thou dost? I am sure thou dost.CE V.i.304.2
Not know my voice, oh times extremity Not know my voice? O time's extremity,CE V.i.308
Hast thou so crack'd and splitted my poore tongue Hast thou so cracked and splitted my poor tongueCE V.i.309
In seuen short yeares, that heere my onely sonne In seven short years that here my only sonCE V.i.310
Knowes not my feeble key of vntun'd cares? Knows not my feeble key of untuned cares?CE V.i.311
Though now this grained face of mine be hid Though now this grained face of mine be hidCE V.i.312
In sap-consuming Winters drizled snow, In sap-consuming winteres drizzled snow,CE V.i.313
And all the Conduits of my blood froze vp: And all the conduits of my blood froze up,CE V.i.314
Yet hath my night of life some memorie: Yet hath my night of life some memory,CE V.i.315
My wasting lampes some fading glimmer left; My wasting lamps some fading glimmer left,CE V.i.316
My dull deafe eares a little vse to heare: My dull deaf ears a little use to hear.CE V.i.317
All these old witnesses, I cannot erre. All these old witnesses, I cannot err,CE V.i.318
Tell me, thou art my sonne Antipholus. Tell me thou art my son Antipholus.CE V.i.319
But seuen yeares since, in Siracusa boy But seven years since, in Syracusa, boy,CE V.i.321
Thou know'st we parted, but perhaps my sonne, Thou knowest we parted. But perhaps, my son,CE V.i.322
Thou sham'st to acknowledge me in miserie. Thou shamest to acknowledge me in misery.CE V.i.323
If I dreame not, thou art Aemilia, If I dream not, thou art Æmilia.CE V.i.353
If thou art she, tell me, where is that sonne If thou art she, tell me, where is that sonCE V.i.354
That floated with thee on the fatall rafte. That floated with thee on the fatal raft?CE V.i.355
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