DUKE
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Merchant of Siracusa, plead no more. Merchant of Syracuse, plead no more.CE I.i.3
I am not partiall to infringe our Lawes; I am not partial to infringe our laws.CE I.i.4
The enmity and discord which of late The enmity and discord which of lateCE I.i.5
Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your Duke, Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your DukeCE I.i.6
To Merchants our well-dealing Countrimen, To merchants, our well-dealing countrymen,CE I.i.7
Who wanting gilders to redeeme their liues, Who, wanting guilders to redeem their lives,CE I.i.8
Haue seal'd his rigorous statutes with their blouds, Have sealed his rigorous statutes with their bloods,CE I.i.9
Excludes all pitty from our threatning lookes: Excludes all pity from our threatening looks.CE I.i.10
For since the mortall and intestine iarres For since the mortal and intestine jarsCE I.i.11
Twixt thy seditious Countrimen and vs, 'Twixt thy seditious countrymen and usCE I.i.12
It hath in solemne Synodes beene decreed, It hath in solemn synods been decreedCE I.i.13
Both by the Siracusians and our selues, Both by the Syracusians and ourselvesCE I.i.14
To admit no trafficke to our aduerse townes: To admit no traffic to our adverse towns.CE I.i.15
Nay more, Nay, more:CE I.i.16
if any borne at Ephesus / Be seene If any born at Ephesus be seenCE I.i.17
at any Siracusian Marts and Fayres: At any Syracusian marts and fairs;CE I.i.18
Againe, if any Siracusian borne Again, if any Syracusian bornCE I.i.19
Come to the Bay of Ephesus, he dies: Come to the bay of Ephesus, he dies,CE I.i.20
His goods confiscate to the Dukes dispose, His goods confiscate to the Duke's dispose,CE I.i.21
Vnlesse a thousand markes be leuied Unless a thousand marks be levied,CE I.i.22
To quit the penalty, and to ransome him: To quit the penalty and to ransom him.CE I.i.23
Thy substance, valued at the highest rate, Thy substance, valued at the highest rate,CE I.i.24
Cannot amount vnto a hundred Markes, Cannot amount unto a hundred marks;CE I.i.25
Therefore by Law thou art condemn'd to die. Therefore by law thou art condemned to die.CE I.i.26
Well Siracusian; say in briefe the cause Well, Syracusian, say in brief the causeCE I.i.29
Why thou departedst from thy natiue home? Why thou departed'st from thy native home,CE I.i.30
And for what cause thou cam'st to Ephesus. And for what cause thou camest to Ephesus.CE I.i.31
Nay forward old man, doe not breake off so, Nay, forward, old man; do not break off so,CE I.i.97
For we may pitty, though not pardon thee. For we may pity, though not pardon thee.CE I.i.98
And for the sake of them thou sorrowest for, And for the sake of them thou sorrowest for,CE I.i.122
Doe me the fauour to dilate at full, Do me the favour to dilate at fullCE I.i.123
What haue befalne of them and they till now. What hath befallen of them and thee till now.CE I.i.124
Haplesse Egeon whom the fates haue markt Hapless Egeon, whom the fates have markedCE I.i.141
To beare the extremitie of dire mishap: To bear the extremity of dire mishap,CE I.i.142
Now trust me, were it not against our Lawes, Now trust me, were it not against our laws,CE I.i.143
Against my Crowne, my oath, my dignity, Against my crown, my oath, my dignity,CE I.i.144
Which Princes would they may not disanull, Which princes, would they, may not disannul,CE I.i.145
My soule should sue as aduocate for thee: My soul should sue as advocate for thee.CE I.i.146
But though thou art adiudged to the death, But, though thou art adjudged to the death,CE I.i.147
And passed sentence may not be recal'd And passed sentence may not be recalledCE I.i.148
But to our honours great disparagement: But to our honour's great disparagement,CE I.i.149
Yet will I fauour thee in what I can; Yet will I favour thee in what I can.CE I.i.150
Therefore Marchant, Ile limit thee this day Therefore, merchant, I'll limit thee this dayCE I.i.151
To seeke thy helpe by beneficiall helpe, To seek thy health by beneficial help.CE I.i.152
Try all the friends thou hast in Ephesus, Try all the friends thou hast in Ephesus;CE I.i.153
Beg thou, or borrow, to make vp the summe, Beg thou or borrow to make up the sum,CE I.i.154
And liue: if no, then thou art doom'd to die: And live. If no, then thou art doomed to die.CE I.i.155
Iaylor, take him to thy custodie. Gaoler, take him to thy custody.CE I.i.156
Yet once againe proclaime it publikely, Yet once again proclaim it publicly,CE V.i.130
If any friend will pay the summe for him, If any friend will pay the sum for him,CE V.i.131
He shall not die, so much we tender him. He shall not die, so much we tender him.CE V.i.132
She is a vertuous and a reuerend Lady, She is a virtuous and a reverend lady.CE V.i.134
It cannot be that she hath done thee wrong. It cannot be that she hath done thee wrong.CE V.i.135
Long since thy husband seru'd me in my wars Long since, thy husband served me in my wars;CE V.i.161
And I to thee ingag'd a Princes word, And I to thee engaged a prince's word,CE V.i.162
When thou didst make him Master of thy bed, When thou didst make him master of thy bed,CE V.i.163
To do him all the grace and good I could. To do him all the grace and good I could.CE V.i.164
Go some of you, knocke at the Abbey gate, Go, some of you, knock at the abbey gate,CE V.i.165
And bid the Lady Abbesse come to me: And bid the Lady Abbess come to me.CE V.i.166
I will determine this before I stirre. I will determine this before I stir.CE V.i.167
Come stand by me, feare nothing: guard with Halberds. Come, stand by me. Fear nothing. Guard with halberds!CE V.i.185
Discouer how, and thou shalt finde me iust. Discover how, and thou shalt find me just.CE V.i.203
A greeuous fault: say woman, didst thou so? A grievous fault. Say, woman, didst thou so?CE V.i.206
But had he such a Chaine of thee, or no? But had he such a chain of thee, or no?CE V.i.257
Why what an intricate impeach is this? Why, what an intricate impeach is this!CE V.i.270
I thinke you all haue drunke of Circes cup: I think you all have drunk of Circe's cup.CE V.i.271
If heere you hous'd him, heere he would haue bin. If here you housed him, here he would have been.CE V.i.272
If he were mad, he would not pleade so coldly: If he were mad, he would not plead so coldly.CE V.i.273
You say he din'd at home, the Goldsmith heere You say he dined at home. The goldsmith hereCE V.i.274
Denies that saying. Sirra, what say you? Denies that saying. (to Dromio of Ephesus) Sirrah, what say you?CE V.i.275
E.Dro.Denies that saying. (to Dromio of Ephesus) Sirrah, what say you?CE V.i.275
Saw'st thou him enter at the Abbey heere? Sawest thou him enter at the abbey here?CE V.i.279
Why this is straunge: Go call the Abbesse hither. Why, this is strange. Go call the Abbesss hither.CE V.i.281
I thinke you are all mated, or starke mad. I think you are all mated, or stark mad.CE V.i.282
Speake freely Siracusian what thou wilt. Speak freely, Syracusian, what thou wilt.CE V.i.286
I tell thee Siracusian, twentie yeares I tell thee, Syracusian, twenty yearsCE V.i.327
Haue I bin Patron to Antipholus, Have I been patron to Antipholus,CE V.i.328
During which time, he ne're saw Siracusa: During which time he ne'er saw Syracusa.CE V.i.329
I see thy age and dangers make thee dote. I see thy age and dangers make thee dote.CE V.i.330
One of these men is genius to the other: One of these men is genius to the other;CE V.i.333
And so of these, which is the naturall man, And so, of these, which is the natural man,CE V.i.334
And which the spirit? Who deciphers them? And which the spirit? Who deciphers them?CE V.i.335
Why heere begins his Morning storie right: Why, here begins his morning story right.CE V.i.347
These two Antipholus, these two so like, These two Antipholuses', these two so like,CE V.i.348
And these two Dromio's, one in semblance: And these two Dromios, one in semblance,CE V.i.349
Besides her vrging of her wracke at sea, Besides her urging of her wrack at sea – CE V.i.350
These are the parents to these children, These are the parents to these children,CE V.i.351
Which accidentally are met together. Which accidentally are met together.CE V.i.352
Antipholus thou cam'st from Corinth first. Antipholus, thou camest from Corinth first.CE V.i.363
Stay, stand apart, I know not which is which. Stay, stand apart. I know not which is which.CE V.i.365
It shall not neede, thy father hath his life. It shall not need. Thy father hath his life.CE V.i.391
With all my heart, Ile Gossip at this feast. With all my heart I'll gossip at this feast.CE V.i.408
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL