DROMIO OF EPHESUS
Show:
Original textModern textKey line
Return'd so soone, rather approacht too late: Returned so soon? Rather approached too late.CE I.ii.43
The Capon burnes, the Pig fals from the spit; The capon burns, the pig falls from the spit.CE I.ii.44
The clocke hath strucken twelue vpon the bell: The clock hath strucken twelve upon the bell;CE I.ii.45
My Mistris made it one vpon my cheeke: My mistress made it one upon my cheek.CE I.ii.46
She is so hot because the meate is colde: She is so hot because the meat is cold.CE I.ii.47
The meate is colde, because you come not home: The meat is cold because you come not home.CE I.ii.48
You come not home, because you haue no stomacke: You come not home because you have no stomach.CE I.ii.49
You haue no stomacke, hauing broke your fast: You have no stomach, having broke your fast.CE I.ii.50
But we that know what 'tis to fast and pray, But we that know what 'tis to fast and prayCE I.ii.51
Are penitent for your default to day. Are penitent for your default today.CE I.ii.52
Oh sixe pence that I had a wensday last, O, sixpence, that I had o' Wednesday lastCE I.ii.55
To pay the Sadler for my Mistris crupper: To pay the saddler for my mistress' crupper.CE I.ii.56
The Sadler had it Sir, I kept it not. The saddler had it, sir. I kept it not.CE I.ii.57
I pray you iest sir as you sit at dinner: I pray you, jest, sir, as you sit at dinner.CE I.ii.62
I from my Mistris come to you in post: I from my mistress come to you in post.CE I.ii.63
If I returne I shall be post indeede. If I return I shall be post indeed,CE I.ii.64
For she will scoure your fault vpon my pate: For she will score your fault upon my pate.CE I.ii.65
Me thinkes your maw, like mine, should be your cooke, Methinks your maw, like mine, should be your clockCE I.ii.66
And strike you home without a messenger. And strike you home without a messenger.CE I.ii.67
To me sir? why you gaue no gold to me? To me, sir? Why, you gave no gold to me!CE I.ii.71
My charge was but to fetch you frõ the Mart My charge was but to fetch you from the martCE I.ii.74
Home to your house, the Phoenix sir, to dinner; Home to your house, the Phoenix, sir, to dinner.CE I.ii.75
My Mistris and her sister staies for you. My mistress and her sister stays for you.CE I.ii.76
I haue some markes of yours vpon my pate: I have some marks of yours upon my pate,CE I.ii.82
Some of my Mistris markes vpon my shoulders: Some of my mistress' marks upon my shoulders,CE I.ii.83
But not a thousand markes betweene you both. But not a thousand marks between you both.CE I.ii.84
If I should pay your worship those againe, If I should pay your worship those again,CE I.ii.85
Perchance you will not beare them patiently. Perchance you will not bear them patiently.CE I.ii.86
Your worships wife, my Mistris at the Phoenix; Your worship's wife, my mistress at the Phoenix;CE I.ii.88
She that doth fast till you come home to dinner: She that doth fast till you come home to dinner,CE I.ii.89
And praies that you will hie you home to dinner. And prays that you will hie you home to dinner.CE I.ii.90
What meane you sir, for God sake hold your hands: What mean you, sir? For God's sake hold your hands.CE I.ii.93
Nay, and you will not sir, Ile take my heeles. Nay, an you will not, sir, I'll take my heels.CE I.ii.94
Nay, hee's at too hands with mee, Nay, he's at two hands with me,CE II.i.45
and that my two eares can witnesse. and that my two ears can witness.CE II.i.46
I, I, he told his minde vpon mine eare, I? Ay. He told his mind upon mine ear.CE II.i.48
Beshrew his hand, I scarce could vnderstand it. Beshrew his hand, I scarce could understand it.CE II.i.49
Nay, hee strooke so plainly, I could Nay, he struck so plainly I couldCE II.i.52
too well feele his blowes; and withall so doubtfully, that I too well feel his blows, and withal so doubtfully that ICE II.i.53
could scarce vnderstand them. could scarce understand them.CE II.i.54
Why Mistresse, sure my Master is horne mad. Why, mistress, sure my master is horn-mad.CE II.i.57
I meane not Cuckold mad, I mean not cuckold-mad,CE II.i.58.2
But sure he is starke mad: But sure he is stark mad.CE II.i.59
When I desir'd him to come home to dinner, When I desired him to come home to dinnerCE II.i.60
He ask'd me for a hundred markes in gold: He asked me for a thousand marks in gold.CE II.i.61
'Tis dinner time, quoth I: my gold, quoth he: ‘ 'Tis dinner-time,’ quoth I. ‘ My gold,’ quoth he.CE II.i.62
Your meat doth burne, quoth I: my gold quoth he: ‘ Your meat doth burn,’ quoth I; ‘ My gold,’ quoth he.CE II.i.63
Will you come, quoth I: my gold, quoth he; ‘ Will you come home?’ quoth I. ‘ My gold,’ quoth he.CE II.i.64
Where is the thousand markes I gaue thee villaine? ‘ Where is the thousand marks I gave thee, villain?’CE II.i.65
The Pigge quoth I, is burn'd: my gold, quoth he: ‘ The pig,’ quoth I, ‘ is burned.’ ‘ My gold,’ quoth he.CE II.i.66
My mistresse, sir, quoth I: hang vp thy Mistresse: ‘ My mistress, sir – ’ quoth I – ‘ Hang up thy mistress!CE II.i.67
I know not thy mistresse, out on thy mistresse. I know not thy mistress. Out on thy mistress!’CE II.i.68
Quoth my Master, Quoth my master.CE II.i.70
I know quoth he, no house, no wife, no mistresse: ‘ I know,’ quoth he, ‘ no house, no wife, no mistress.’CE II.i.71
so that my arrant due vnto my tongue, So that my errand, due unto my tongue,CE II.i.72
I thanke him, I bare home vpon my shoulders: I thank him, I bare home upon my shoulders;CE II.i.73
for in conclusion, he did beat me there. For, in conclusion, he did beat me there.CE II.i.74
Goe backe againe, and be new beaten home? Go back again, and be new-beaten home?CE II.i.76
For Gods sake send some other messenger. For God's sake send some other messenger.CE II.i.77
And he will blesse yt crosse with other beating: And he will bless that cross with other beating,CE II.i.79
Betweene you, I shall haue a holy head. Between you I shall have a holy head.CE II.i.80
Am I so round with you, as you with me, Am I so round with you as you with meCE II.i.82
That like a foot-ball you doe spurne me thus: That like a football you do spurn me thus?CE II.i.83
You spurne me hence, and he will spurne me hither, You spurn me hence, and he will spurn me hither.CE II.i.84
If I last in this seruice, you must case me in leather. If I last in this service you must case me in leather.CE II.i.85
Say what you wil sir, but I know what I know, Say what you will, sir, but I know what I know:CE III.i.11
That you beat me at the Mart I haue your hand to show; That you beat me at the mart I have your hand to show.CE III.i.12
If yr skin were parchment, & ye blows you gaue were ink, If the skin were parchment and the blows you gave were ink,CE III.i.13
Your owne hand-writing would tell you what I thinke. Your own handwriting would tell you what I think.CE III.i.14
Marry so it doth appeare Marry, so it doth appearCE III.i.15.2
By the wrongs I suffer, and the blowes I beare, By the wrongs I suffer, and the blows I bear.CE III.i.16
I should kicke being kickt, and being at that passe, I should kick, being kicked, and, being at that pass,CE III.i.17
You would keepe from my heeles, and beware of an asse. You would keep from my heels, and beware of an ass.CE III.i.18
Maud, Briget, Marian, Cisley, Gillian, Ginn. Maud, Bridget, Marian, Cicely, Gillian, Ginn!CE III.i.31
What patch is made our Porter? my Master stayes in the street. What patch is made our porter? – My master stays in the street.CE III.i.36
O villaine, thou hast stolne both mine office and my name, O, villain, thou hast stolen both mine office and my name.CE III.i.44
The one nere got me credit, the other mickle blame: The one ne'er got me credit, the other mickle blame.CE III.i.45
If thou hadst beene Dromio to day in my place, If thou hadst been Dromio today in my place,CE III.i.46
Thou wouldst haue chang'd thy face for a name, or thy name for an asse. Thou wouldst have changed thy face for a name, or thy name for an ass.CE III.i.47
Let my Master in Luce. Let my master in, Luce.CE III.i.49.1
O Lord I must laugh, O Lord, I must laugh.CE III.i.50.2
haue at you with a Prouerbe, / Shall I set in my staffe. Have at you with a proverb: shall I set in my staff?CE III.i.51
So come helpe, well strooke, there was blow for blow. So, come – help. Well struck! There was blow for blow.CE III.i.56
Master, knocke the doore hard. Master, knock the door hard.CE III.i.58.1
If you went in paine Master, this knaue wold goe sore. If you went in pain, master, this knave would go sore.CE III.i.65
They stand at the doore, Master, bid them welcome hither. They stand at the door, master. Bid them welcome hither.CE III.i.68
You would say so Master, if your garments were thin. You would say so, master, if your garments were thin.CE III.i.70
Your cake here is warme within: you stand here in the cold. Your cake here is warm within. You stand here in the cold.CE III.i.71
It would make a man mad as a Bucke to be so bought and sold. It would make a man mad as a buck to be so bought and sold.CE III.i.72
A man may breake a word with your sir, and words are but winde: A man may break a word with you, sir, and words are but wind;CE III.i.75
I and breake it in your face, so he break it not behinde. Ay, and break it in your face, so he break it not behind.CE III.i.76
Here's too much out vpon thee, I pray thee let me in. Here's too much ‘ Out upon thee.’ I pray thee, let me in.CE III.i.78
A crow without feather, Master meane you so; A crow without feather, master – mean you so?CE III.i.81
For a fish without a finne, ther's a fowle without a fether, For a fish without a fin, there's a fowl without a feather. – CE III.i.82
If a crow help vs in sirra, wee'll plucke a crow together. If a crow help us in, sirrah, we'll pluck a crow together.CE III.i.83
I buy a thousand pound a yeare, I buy a rope. I buy a thousand pound a year, I buy a rope.CE IV.i.21
Here's that I warrant you will pay them all. Here's that, I warrant you, will pay them all.CE IV.iv.10
Why sir, I gaue the Monie for the Rope. Why, sir, I gave the money for the rope.CE IV.iv.12
Ile serue you sir fiue hundred at the rate. I'll serve you, sir, five hundred at the rate.CE IV.iv.14
To a ropes end sir, and to that end am I return'd. To a rope's end, sir, and to that end am I returned.CE IV.iv.16
Nay 'tis for me to be patient, I am in aduersitie. Nay, 'tis for me to be patient. I am in adversity.CE IV.iv.19
Nay, rather perswade him to hold his hands. Nay, rather persuade him to hold his hands.CE IV.iv.21
I would I were senselesse sir, that I would I were senseless, sir, thatCE IV.iv.24
I might not feele your blowes. I might not feel your blows.CE IV.iv.25
I am an Asse indeede, you may I am an ass, indeed. You mayCE IV.iv.27
prooue it by my long eares. I haue serued him from the prove it by my long ears. I have served him from theCE IV.iv.28
houre of my Natiuitie to this instant, and haue nothing at hour of my nativity to this instant, and have nothing atCE IV.iv.29
his hands for my seruice but blowes. When I am cold, he his hands for my service but blows. When I am cold, heCE IV.iv.30
heates me with beating: when I am warme, he cooles me heats me with beating. When I am warm, he cools meCE IV.iv.31
with beating: I am wak'd with it when I sleepe, rais'd with beating. I am waked with it when I sleep, raisedCE IV.iv.32
with it when I sit, driuen out of doores with it when I with it when I sit, driven out of doors with it when ICE IV.iv.33
goe from home, welcom'd home with it when I returne, go from home, welcomed home with it when I return;CE IV.iv.34
nay I beare it on my shoulders, as a begger woont her nay, I bear it on my shoulders, as a beggar wont herCE IV.iv.35
brat: and I thinke when he hath lam'd me, I shall begge brat, and I think when he hath lamed me, I shall begCE IV.iv.36
with it from doore to doore. with it from door to door.CE IV.iv.37
Mistris respice finem, respect Mistress, respice finem – ‘ respectCE IV.iv.39
your end, or rather the prophesie like the Parrat, beware your end,’ or rather, to prophesy like the parrot, ‘ bewareCE IV.iv.40
the ropes end. the rope's end.’CE IV.iv.41
Sir sooth to say, you did not dine at home. Sir, sooth to say, you did not dine at home.CE IV.iv.67
Perdie, your doores were lockt, and you shut out. Perdie, your doors were locked, and you shut out.CE IV.iv.69
Sans Fable, she her selfe reuil'd you there. Sans fable, she herself reviled you there.CE IV.iv.71
Certis she did, the kitchin vestall scorn'd you. Certes she did. The kitchen vestal scorned you.CE IV.iv.73
In veritie you did, my bones beares witnesse, In verity you did. My bones bear witness,CE IV.iv.75
That since haue felt the vigor of his rage. That since have felt the vigour of his rage.CE IV.iv.76
Monie by me? Heart and good will you might, Money by me? Heart and good will you might,CE IV.iv.83
But surely Master not a ragge of Monie. But surely, master, not a rag of money.CE IV.iv.84
God and the Rope-maker beare me witnesse, God and the ropemaker bear me witnessCE IV.iv.88
That I was sent for nothing but a rope. That I was sent for nothing but a rope.CE IV.iv.89
And gentle Mr I receiu'd no gold: And, gentle master, I received no gold.CE IV.iv.96
But I confesse sir, that we were lock'd out. But I confess, sir, that we were locked out.CE IV.iv.97
Master, I am heere entred in bond for you. Master, I am here entered in bond for you.CE IV.iv.123
Will you be bound for nothing, be mad good Master, Will you be bound for nothing? Be mad, good master – CE IV.iv.125
cry the diuell. Cry ‘ the devil!’.CE IV.iv.126
Sir he din'de with her there, at the Porpen-tine. Sir, he dined with her there at the Porpentine.CE V.i.276
Within this houre I was his bondman sir, Within this hour I was his bondman, sir,CE V.i.289
But he I thanke him gnaw'd in two my cords, But he, I thank him, gnawed in two my cords.CE V.i.290
Now am I Dromio, and his man, vnbound. Now am I Dromio, and his man, unbound.CE V.i.291
Our selues we do remember sir by you: Ourselves we do remember, sir, by you,CE V.i.293
For lately we were bound as you are now. For lately we were bound as you are now.CE V.i.294
You are not Pinches patient, are you sir? You are not Pinch's patient, are you, sir?CE V.i.295
No trust me sir, nor I. No, trust me, sir, nor I.CE V.i.304.1
I sir, but I am sure I do not, Ay, sir, but I am sure I do not,CE V.i.305
and whatsoeuer a man denies, you are now bound to and whatsoever a man denies you are now bound toCE V.i.306
beleeue him. believe him.CE V.i.307
I Sir am Dromio, pray let me stay. I, sir, am Dromio. Pray let me stay.CE V.i.337
And I with him. And I with him.CE V.i.367
No, none by me. No, none by me.CE V.i.384
Me thinks you are my glasse, & not my brother: Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother.CE V.i.418
I see by you, I am a sweet-fac'd youth, I see by you I am a sweet-faced youth.CE V.i.419
Will you walke in to see their gossipping? Will you walk in to see their gossiping?CE V.i.420
That's a question, how shall we trie it. That's a question. How shall we try it?CE V.i.422
Nay then thus: Nay then, thus:CE V.i.424
We came into the world like brother and brother: We came into the world like brother and brother,CE V.i.425
And now let's go hand in hand, not one before another. And now let's go hand in hand, not one before another.CE V.i.426
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL