ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS
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Good signior Angelo you must excuse vs all, Good Signior Angelo, you must excuse us all.CE III.i.1
My wife is shrewish when I keepe not howres; My wife is shrewish when I keep not hours.CE III.i.2
Say that I lingerd with you at your shop Say that I lingered with you at your shopCE III.i.3
To see the making of her Carkanet, To see the making of her carcanet,CE III.i.4
And that to morrow you will bring it home. And that tomorrow you will bring it home.CE III.i.5
But here's a villaine that would face me downe But here's a villain that would face me downCE III.i.6
He met me on the Mart, and that I beat him, He met me on the mart, and that I beat him,CE III.i.7
And charg'd him with a thousand markes in gold, And charged him with a thousand marks in gold,CE III.i.8
And that I did denie my wife and house; And that I did deny my wife and house.CE III.i.9
Thou drunkard thou, what didst thou meane by this? Thou drunkard, thou – what didst thou mean by this?CE III.i.10
I thinke thou art an asse. I think thou art an ass.CE III.i.15.1
Y'are sad signior Balthazar, pray God our cheer You're sad, Signor Balthasar. Pray God our cheerCE III.i.19
May answer my good will, and your good welcom here. May answer my good will, and your good welcome here.CE III.i.20
Oh signior Balthazar, either at flesh or fish, O, Signor Balthasar, either at flesh or fishCE III.i.22
A table full of welcome, makes scarce one dainty dish. A table full of welcome makes scarce one dainty dish.CE III.i.23
And welcome more common, for thats nothing but words. And welcome more common, for that's nothing but words.CE III.i.25
I, to a niggardly Host, and more sparing guest: Ay, to a niggardly host and more sparing guest.CE III.i.27
But though my cates be meane, take them in good part, But though my cates be mean, take them in good part.CE III.i.28
Better cheere may you haue, but not with better hart. Better cheer may you have, but not with better heart.CE III.i.29
But soft, my doore is lockt; goe bid them let vs in. But soft, my door is locked. Go bid them let us in.CE III.i.30
Who talks within there? hoa, open the dore. Who talks within, there? Hoa, open the door.CE III.i.38
Wherefore? for my dinner: I haue not din'd to day. Wherefore? For my dinner. I have not dined today.CE III.i.40
What art thou that keep'st mee out from the howse I owe? What art thou that keepest me out from the house I owe?CE III.i.42
Doe you heare you minion, you'll let vs in I hope? Do you hear, you minion? You'll let us in, I trowCE III.i.54
Thou baggage let me in. Thou baggage, let me in.CE III.i.57.1
You'll crie for this minion, if I beat the doore downe. You'll cry for this, minion, if I beat the door down.CE III.i.59
Are you there Wife? you might haue come before. Are you there, wife? You might have come before.CE III.i.63
There is something in the winde, that we cannot get in. There is something in the wind, that we cannot get in.CE III.i.69
Go fetch me something, Ile break ope the gate. Go fetch me something. I'll break ope the gate.CE III.i.73
Well, Ile breake in: go borrow me a crow. Well, I'll break in. Go borrow me a crow.CE III.i.80
Go, get thee gon, fetch me an iron Crow. Go, get thee gone. Fetch me an iron crow.CE III.i.84
You haue preuail'd, I will depart in quiet, You have prevailed. I will depart in quiet,CE III.i.107
And in despight of mirth meane to be merrie: And in despite of mirth mean to be merry.CE III.i.108
I know a wench of excellent discourse, I know a wench of excellent discourse,CE III.i.109
Prettie and wittie; wilde, and yet too gentle; Pretty and witty; wild, and yet, too, gentle.CE III.i.110
There will we dine: this woman that I meane There will we dine. This woman that I mean,CE III.i.111
My wife (but I protest without desert) My wife – but, I protest, without desert – CE III.i.112
Hath oftentimes vpbraided me withall: Hath oftentimes upbraided me withal.CE III.i.113
To her will we to dinner, get you home To her will we to dinner. (To Angelo) Get you homeCE III.i.114
And fetch the chaine, by this I know 'tis made, And fetch the chain. By this, I know, 'tis made.CE III.i.115
Bring it I pray you to the Porpentine, Bring it, I pray you, to the Porpentine,CE III.i.116
For there's the house: That chaine will I bestow For there's the house. That chain will I bestow – CE III.i.117
(Be it for nothing but to spight my wife) Be it for nothing but to spite my wife – CE III.i.118
Vpon mine hostesse there, good sir make haste: Upon mine hostess there. Good sir, make haste.CE III.i.119
Since mine owne doores refuse to entertaine me, Since mine own doors refuse to entertain me,CE III.i.120
Ile knocke else-where, to see if they'll disdaine me. I'll knock elsewhere to see if they'll disdain me.CE III.i.121
Do so, this iest shall cost me some expence. Do so. – This jest shall cost me some expense.CE III.i.123
While I go to the Goldsmiths house, go thou While I go to the goldsmith's house, go thouCE IV.i.15
And buy a ropes end, that will I bestow And buy a rope's end; that will I bestowCE IV.i.16
Among my wife, and their confederates, Among my wife and her confederatesCE IV.i.17
For locking me out of my doores by day: For locking me out of my doors by day.CE IV.i.18
But soft I see the Goldsmith; get thee gone, But soft, I see the goldsmith. Get thee gone;CE IV.i.19
Buy thou a rope, and bring it home to me. Buy thou a rope, and bring it home to me.CE IV.i.20
A man is well holpe vp that trusts to you, A man is well holp up that trusts to you.CE IV.i.22
I promised your presence, and the Chaine, I promised your presence and the chain,CE IV.i.23
But neither Chaine nor Goldsmith came to me: But neither chain nor goldsmith came to me.CE IV.i.24
Belike you thought our loue would last too long Belike you thought our love would last too longCE IV.i.25
If it were chain'd together: and therefore came not. If it were chained together, and therefore came not.CE IV.i.26
I am not furnish'd with the present monie: I am not furnished with the present money;CE IV.i.34
Besides I haue some businesse in the towne, Besides, I have some business in the town.CE IV.i.35
Good Signior take the stranger to my house, Good signor, take the stranger to my house,CE IV.i.36
And with you take the Chaine, and bid my wife And with you take the chain, and bid my wifeCE IV.i.37
Disburse the summe, on the receit thereof, Disburse the sum on the receipt thereof.CE IV.i.38
Perchance I will be there as soone as you. Perchance I will be there as soon as you.CE IV.i.39
No beare it with you, least I come not time enough. No, bear it with you lest I come not time enough.CE IV.i.41
And if I haue not sir, I hope you haue: An if I have not, sir, I hope you have;CE IV.i.43
Or else you may returne without your money. Or else you may return without your money.CE IV.i.44
Good Lord, you vse this dalliance to excuse Good Lord! You use this dalliance to excuseCE IV.i.48
Your breach of promise to the Porpentine, Your breach of promise to the Porpentine.CE IV.i.49
I should haue chid you for not bringing it, I should have chid you for not bringing it,CE IV.i.50
But like a shrew you first begin to brawle. But like a shrew you first begin to brawl.CE IV.i.51
Why giue it to my wife, and fetch your mony. Why, give it to my wife, and fetch your money.CE IV.i.54
Fie, now you run this humor out of breath, Fie, now you run this humour out of breath.CE IV.i.57
Come where's the Chaine, I pray you let me see it. Come, where's the chain? I pray you let me see it.CE IV.i.58
I answer you? What should I answer you. I answer you? What should I answer you?CE IV.i.62
I owe you none, till I receiue the Chaine. I owe you none till I receive the chain.CE IV.i.64
You gaue me none, you wrong mee much to say so. You gave me none. You wrong me much to say so.CE IV.i.66
Consent to pay thee that I neuer had: Consent to pay thee that I never had?CE IV.i.75
Arrest me foolish fellow if thou dar'st. Arrest me, foolish fellow, if thou darest.CE IV.i.76
I do obey thee, till I giue thee baile. I do obey thee till I give thee bail.CE IV.i.81
But sirrah, you shall buy this sport as deere, But, sirrah, you shall buy this sport as dearCE IV.i.82
As all the mettall in your shop will answer. As all the metal in your shop will answer.CE IV.i.83
How now? a Madman? Why thou peeuish sheep How now? A madman? Why, thou peevish sheep,CE IV.i.94
What ship of Epidamium staies for me. What ship of Epidamnum stays for me?CE IV.i.95
Thou drunken slaue, I sent thee for a rope, Thou drunken slave, I sent thee for a rope,CE IV.i.97
And told thee to what purpose, and what end. And told thee to what purpose, and what end.CE IV.i.98
I will debate this matter at more leisure I will debate this matter at more leisure,CE IV.i.101
And teach your eares to list me with more heede: And teach your ears to list me with more heed.CE IV.i.102
To Adriana Villaine hie thee straight: To Adriana, villain, hie thee straight.CE IV.i.103
Giue her this key, and tell her in the Deske Give her this key, and tell her in the deskCE IV.i.104
That's couer'd o're with Turkish Tapistrie, That's covered o'er with Turkish tapestryCE IV.i.105
There is a purse of Duckets, let her send it: There is a purse of ducats. Let her send it.CE IV.i.106
Tell her, I am arrested in the streete, Tell her I am arrested in the street,CE IV.i.107
And that shall baile me: hie thee slaue, be gone, And that shall bail me. Hie thee, slave. Be gone.CE IV.i.108
On Officer to prison, till it come.On, officer; to prison, till it come.CE IV.i.109
Feare me not man, I will not breake away, Fear me not, man. I will not break away.CE IV.iv.1
Ile giue thee ere I leaue thee so much money I'll give thee ere I leave thee so much moneyCE IV.iv.2
To warrant thee as I am rested for. To warrant thee as I am 'rested for.CE IV.iv.3
My wife is in a wayward moode to day, My wife is in a wayward mood today,CE IV.iv.4
And will not lightly trust the Messenger, And will not lightly trust the messengerCE IV.iv.5
That I should be attach'd in Ephesus, That I should be attached in Ephesus.CE IV.iv.6
I tell you 'twill sound harshly in her eares. I tell you, 'twill sound harshly in her ears.CE IV.iv.7
Heere comes my Man, I thinke he brings the monie. Here comes my man. I think he brings the money.CE IV.iv.8
How now sir? Haue you that I sent you for? How now, sir. Have you that I sent you for?CE IV.iv.9
But where's the Money? But where's the money?CE IV.iv.11
Fiue hundred Duckets villaine for a rope? Five hundred ducats, villain, for a rope?CE IV.iv.13
To what end did I bid thee hie thee home? To what end did I bid thee hie thee home?CE IV.iv.15
And to that end sir, I will welcome you. And to that end, sir, I will welcome you.CE IV.iv.17
Thou whoreson senselesseThou whoreson, senselessCE IV.iv.22
Villaine. villain.CE IV.iv.23
Thou art sensible in nothing but blowes, and so is an Asse. Thou art sensible in nothing but blows; and so is an ass.CE IV.iv.26
Come goe along, my wife is comming yonder. Come, go along – my wife is coming yonder.CE IV.iv.38
Wilt thou still talke?Wilt thou still talk?CE IV.iv.42
There is my hand, and let it feele your eare. There is my hand, and let it feel your ear.CE IV.iv.51
Peace doting wizard, peace; I am not mad. Peace, doting wizard, peace. I am not mad.CE IV.iv.56
You Minion you, are these your Customers? You minion, you, are these your customers?CE IV.iv.58
Did this Companion with the saffron face Did this companion with the saffron faceCE IV.iv.59
Reuell and feast it at my house to day, Revel and feast it at my house today,CE IV.iv.60
Whil'st vpon me the guiltie doores were shut, Whilst upon me the guilty doors were shut,CE IV.iv.61
And I denied to enter in my house. And I denied to enter in my house?CE IV.iv.62
Din'd at home? Thou Villaine, what sayest thou? Dined at home? (To Dromio) Thou villain, what sayst thou?CE IV.iv.66
Were not my doores lockt vp, and I shut out? Were not my doors locked up, and I shut out?CE IV.iv.68
And did not she her selfe reuile me there? And did not she herself revile me there?CE IV.iv.70
Did not her Kitchen maide raile, taunt, and scorne me? Did not her kitchen-maid rail, taunt, and scorn me?CE IV.iv.72
And did not I in rage depart from thence? And did not I in rage depart from thence?CE IV.iv.74
Thou hast subborn'd the Goldsmith to arrest mee. Thou hast suborned the goldsmith to arrest me.CE IV.iv.80
Wentst not thou to her for a purse of Duckets. Went'st not thou to her for a purse of ducats?CE IV.iv.85
Say wherefore didst thou locke me forth to day, Say, wherefore didst thou lock me forth today,CE IV.iv.93
And why dost thou denie the bagge of gold? And why dost thou deny the bag of gold?CE IV.iv.94
Dissembling harlot, thou art false in all, Dissembling harlot, thou art false in all,CE IV.iv.99
And art confederate with a damned packe, And art confederate with a damned packCE IV.iv.100
To make a loathsome abiect scorne of me: To make a loathsome abject scorn of me.CE IV.iv.101
But with these nailes, Ile plucke out these false eyes, But with these nails I'll pluck out these false eyesCE IV.iv.102
That would behold in me this shamefull sport. That would behold in me this shameful sport.CE IV.iv.103
What will you murther me, thou Iailor thou? What, will you murder me? Thou, gaoler, thou,CE IV.iv.107
I am thy prisoner, wilt thou suffer them I am thy prisoner – wilt thou suffer themCE IV.iv.108
to make a rescue? To make a rescue?CE IV.iv.109.1
Oh most vnhappie strumpet. O most unhappy strumpet!CE IV.iv.122
Out on thee Villaine, wherefore dost thou mad mee? Out on thee, villain! Wherefore dost thou mad me?CE IV.iv.124
Iustice most gracious Duke, oh grant me iustice, Justice, most gracious Duke, O grant me justice,CE V.i.190
Euen for the seruice that long since I did thee, Even for the service that long since I did theeCE V.i.191
When I bestrid thee in the warres, and tooke When I bestrid thee in the wars, and tookCE V.i.192
Deepe scarres to saue thy life; euen for the blood Deep scars to save thy life. Even for the bloodCE V.i.193
That then I lost for thee, now grant me iustice. That then I lost for thee, now grant me justice!CE V.i.194
Iustice (sweet Prince) against yt Woman there: Justice, sweet prince, against that woman there,CE V.i.197
She whom thou gau'st to me to be my wife; She whom thou gavest to me to be my wife;CE V.i.198
That hath abused and dishonored me, That hath abused and dishonoured meCE V.i.199
Euen in the strength and height of iniurie: Even in the strength and height of injury.CE V.i.200
Beyond imagination is the wrong Beyond imagination is the wrongCE V.i.201
That she this day hath shamelesse throwne on me. That she this day hath shameless thrown on me.CE V.i.202
This day (great Duke) she shut the doores vpon me, This day, great Duke, she shut the doors upon meCE V.i.204
While she with Harlots feasted in my house. While she with harlots feasted in my house.CE V.i.205
My Liege, I am aduised what I say, My liege, I am advised what I say,CE V.i.214
Neither disturbed with the effect of Wine, Neither disturbed with the effect of wineCE V.i.215
Nor headie-rash prouoak'd with raging ire, Nor heady-rash provoked with raging ire,CE V.i.216
Albeit my wrongs might make one wiser mad. Albeit my wrongs might make one wiser mad.CE V.i.217
This woman lock'd me out this day from dinner; This woman locked me out this day from dinner.CE V.i.218
That Goldsmith there, were he not pack'd with her, That goldsmith there, were he not packed with her,CE V.i.219
Could witnesse it: for he was with me then, Could witness it, for he was with me then,CE V.i.220
Who parted with me to go fetch a Chaine, Who parted with me to go fetch a chain,CE V.i.221
Promising to bring it to the Porpentine, Promising to bring it to the Porpentine,CE V.i.222
Where Balthasar and I did dine together. Where Balthasar and I did dine together.CE V.i.223
Our dinner done, and he not comming thither, Our dinner done, and he not coming thither,CE V.i.224
I went to seeke him. In the street I met him, I went to seek him. In the street I met him,CE V.i.225
And in his companie that Gentleman. And in his company that gentleman.CE V.i.226
There did this periur'd Goldsmith sweare me downe, There did this perjured goldsmith swear me downCE V.i.227
That I this day of him receiu'd the Chaine, That I this day of him received the chain,CE V.i.228
Which God he knowes, I saw not. For the which, Which, God he knows, I saw not. for the whichCE V.i.229
He did arrest me with an Officer. He did arrest me with an officer.CE V.i.230
I did obey, and sent my Pesant home I did obey, and sent my peasant homeCE V.i.231
For certaine Duckets: he with none return'd. For certain ducats. He with none returned.CE V.i.232
Then fairely I bespoke the Officer Then fairly I bespoke the officerCE V.i.233
To go in person with me to my house. To go in person with me to my house.CE V.i.234
By'th' way, we met By the way we metCE V.i.235
my wife, her sister, and a rabble more My wife, her sister, and a rabble moreCE V.i.236
Of vilde Confederates: Along with them Of vile confederates. Along with themCE V.i.237
They brought one Pinch, a hungry leane-fac'd Villaine; They brought one Pinch, a hungry, lean-faced villain,CE V.i.238
A meere Anatomie, a Mountebanke, A mere anatomy, a mountebank,CE V.i.239
A thred-bare Iugler, and a Fortune-teller, A threadbare juggler and a fortune-teller,CE V.i.240
A needy-hollow-ey'd-sharpe-looking-wretch; A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch,CE V.i.241
A liuing dead man. This pernicious slaue, A living dead man. This pernicious slave,CE V.i.242
Forsooth tooke on him as a Coniurer: Forsooth, took on him as a conjuror,CE V.i.243
And gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse, And gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse,CE V.i.244
And with no-face (as 'twere) out-facing me, And with no face, as 'twere, outfacing me,CE V.i.245
Cries out, I was possest. Then altogether Cries out I was possessed. Then all togetherCE V.i.246
They fell vpon me, bound me, bore me thence, They fell upon me, bound me, bore me thence,CE V.i.247
And in a darke and dankish vault at home And in a dark and dankish vault at homeCE V.i.248
There left me and my man, both bound together, There left me and my man, both bound together,CE V.i.249
Till gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, Till, gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder,CE V.i.250
I gain'd my freedome; and immediately I gained my freedom, and immediatelyCE V.i.251
Ran hether to your Grace, whom I beseech Ran hither to your grace, whom I beseechCE V.i.252
To giue me ample satisfaction To give me ample satisfactionCE V.i.253
For these deepe shames, and great indignities. For these deep shames and great indignities.CE V.i.254
I neuer came within these Abbey wals, I never came within these abbey walls,CE V.i.266
Nor euer didst thou draw thy sword on me: Nor ever didst thou draw thy sword on me.CE V.i.267
I neuer saw the Chaine, so helpe me heauen: I never saw the chain, so help me heaven,CE V.i.268
And this is false you burthen me withall. And this is false you burden me withal.CE V.i.269
Tis true (my Liege) this Ring I had of her. 'Tis true, my liege, this ring I had of her.CE V.i.278
I neuer saw you in my life till now. I never saw you in my life till now.CE V.i.297
Neither. Neither.CE V.i.302
I neuer saw my Father in my life. I never saw my father in my life.CE V.i.320
The Duke, and all that know me in the City, The Duke and all that know me in the cityCE V.i.324
Can witnesse with me that it is not so. Can witness with me that it is not so.CE V.i.325
I ne're saw Siracusa in my life. I ne'er saw Syracusa in my life.CE V.i.326
I came from Corinth my most gracious Lord I came from Corinth, my most gracious lord.CE V.i.366
Brought to this Town by that most famous Warriour, Brought to this town by that most famous warriorCE V.i.368
Duke Menaphon your most renowned Vnckle. Duke Menaphon, your most renowned uncle.CE V.i.369
No, I say nay to that. No, I say nay to that.CE V.i.372
And you sir for this Chaine arrested me. And you, sir, for this chain arrested me.CE V.i.380
These Duckets pawne I for my father heere. These ducats pawn I for my father here.CE V.i.390
There take it, and much thanks for my good cheere. There, take it, and much thanks for my good cheer.CE V.i.393
Dromio, what stuffe of mine hast thou imbarkt Dromio, what stuff of mine hast thou embarked?CE V.i.410
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