ANGELO
Show:
Original textModern textKey line
Heere is neither cheere sir, nor welcome, we would faine haue either. Here is neither cheer, sir, nor welcome. We would fain have either.CE III.i.66
Ile meet you at that place some houre hence. I'll meet you at that place some hour hence.CE III.i.122
Mr Antipholus. Master Antipholus.CE III.ii.173.1
I know it well sir, loe here's the chaine, I know it well, sir. Lo, here's the chain.CE III.ii.174
I thought to haue tane you at the Porpentine, I thought to have ta'en you at the Porpentine.CE III.ii.175
The chaine vnfinish'd made me stay thus long. The chain unfinished made me stay thus long.CE III.ii.176
What please your selfe sir: I haue made it for you. What please yourself, sir. I have made it for you.CE III.ii.178
Not once, nor twice, but twentie times you haue: Not once, nor twice, but twenty times you have.CE III.ii.180
Go home with it, and please your Wife withall, Go home with it, and please your wife withal,CE III.ii.181
And soone at supper time Ile visit you, And soon at supper-time I'll visit you,CE III.ii.182
And then receiue my money for the chaine. And then receive my money for the chain.CE III.ii.183
You are a merry man sir, fare you well.You are a merry man, sir. Fare you well.CE III.ii.186
Euen iust the sum that I do owe to you, Even just the sum that I do owe to youCE IV.i.7
Is growing to me by Antipholus, Is growing to me by Antipholus,CE IV.i.8
And in the instant that I met with you, And in the instant that I met with youCE IV.i.9
He had of me a Chaine, at fiue a clocke He had of me a chain. At five o'clockCE IV.i.10
I shall receiue the money for the same: I shall receive the money for the same.CE IV.i.11
Pleaseth you walke with me downe to his house, Pleaseth you walk with me down to his house,CE IV.i.12
I will discharge my bond, and thanke you too. I will discharge my bond, and thank you, too.CE IV.i.13
Sauing your merrie humor: here's the note Saving your merry humour, here's the noteCE IV.i.27
How much your Chaine weighs to the vtmost charect, How much your chain weighs to the utmost carat,CE IV.i.28
The finenesse of the Gold, and chargefull fashion, The fineness of the gold, and chargeful fashion,CE IV.i.29
Which doth amount to three odde Duckets more Which doth amount to three odd ducats moreCE IV.i.30
Then I stand debted to this Gentleman, Than I stand debted to this gentleman.CE IV.i.31
I pray you see him presently discharg'd, I pray you see him presently discharged,CE IV.i.32
For he is bound to Sea, and stayes but for it. For he is bound to sea, and stays but for it.CE IV.i.33
Then you will bring the Chaine to her your selfe. Then you will bring the chain to her yourself.CE IV.i.40
Well sir, I will? Haue you the Chaine about you? Well, sir, I will. Have you the chain about you?CE IV.i.42
Nay come I pray you sir, giue me the Chaine: Nay, come, I pray you, sir, give me the chain.CE IV.i.45
Both winde and tide stayes for this Gentleman, Both wind and tide stays for this gentleman,CE IV.i.46
And I too blame haue held him heere too long. And I, too blame, have held him here too long.CE IV.i.47
You heare how he importunes me, the Chaine. You hear how he importunes me. The chain!CE IV.i.53
Come, come, you know I gaue it you euen now. Come, come. You know I gave it you even now.CE IV.i.55
Either send the Chaine, or send me by some token. Either send the chain, or send me by some token.CE IV.i.56
The monie that you owe me for the Chaine. The money that you owe me for the chain.CE IV.i.63
You know I gaue it you halfe an houre since. You know I gave it you half an hour since.CE IV.i.65
You wrong me more sir in denying it. You wrong me more, sir, in denying it.CE IV.i.67
Consider how it stands vpon my credit. Consider how it stands upon my credit.CE IV.i.68
This touches me in reputation. This touches me in reputation.CE IV.i.72
Either consent to pay this sum for me, Either consent to pay this sum for me,CE IV.i.73
Or I attach you by this Officer. Or I attach you by this officer.CE IV.i.74
Heere is thy fee, arrest him Officer. Here is thy fee – arrest him, officer.CE IV.i.77
I would not spare my brother in this case, I would not spare my brother in this caseCE IV.i.78
If he should scorne me so apparantly. If he should scorn me so apparently.CE IV.i.79
Sir, sir, I shall haue Law in Ephesus, Sir, sir, I shall have law in Ephesus,CE IV.i.84
To your notorious shame, I doubt it not. To your notorious shame, I doubt it not.CE IV.i.85
I am sorry Sir that I haue hindred you, I am sorry, sir, that I have hindered you;CE V.i.1
But I protest he had the Chaine of me, But I protest he had the chain of me,CE V.i.2
Though most dishonestly he doth denie it. Though most dishonestly he doth deny it.CE V.i.3
Of very reuerent reputation sir, Of very reverend reputation, sir,CE V.i.5
Of credit infinite, highly belou'd, Of credit infinite, highly beloved,CE V.i.6
Second to none that liues heere in the Citie: Second to none that lives here in the city.CE V.i.7
His word might beare my wealth at any time. His word might bear my wealth at any time.CE V.i.8
'Tis so: and that selfe chaine about his necke, 'Tis so; and that self chain about his neckCE V.i.10
Which he forswore most monstrously to haue. Which he forswore most monstrously to have.CE V.i.11
Good sir draw neere to me, Ile speake to him: Good sir, draw near to me. I'll speak to him.CE V.i.12
Signior Antipholus, I wonder much Signor Antipholus, I wonder muchCE V.i.13
That you would put me to this shame and trouble, That you would put me to this shame and trouble,CE V.i.14
And not without some scandall to your selfe, And not without some scandal to yourself,CE V.i.15
With circumstance and oaths, so to denie With circumstance and oaths so to denyCE V.i.16
This Chaine, which now you weare so openly. This chain, which now you wear so openly.CE V.i.17
Beside the charge, the shame, imprisonment, Beside the charge, the shame, imprisonment,CE V.i.18
You haue done wrong to this my honest friend, You have done wrong to this my honest friend,CE V.i.19
Who but for staying on our Controuersie, Who, but for staying on our controversy,CE V.i.20
Had hoisted saile, and put to sea to day: Had hoisted sail and put to sea today.CE V.i.21
This Chaine you had of me, can you deny it? This chain you had of me. Can you deny it?CE V.i.22
I knew he was not in his perfect wits. I knew he was not in his perfect wits.CE V.i.42
Vpon what cause? Upon what cause?CE V.i.123
See where they come, we wil behold his death See where they come. We will behold his death.CE V.i.128
O periur'd woman! They are both forsworne, O perjured woman! They are both forsworn.CE V.i.212
In this the Madman iustly chargeth them. In this the madman justly chargeth them.CE V.i.213
My Lord, in truth, thus far I witnes with him: My lord, in truth, thus far I witness with him:CE V.i.255
That he din'd not at home, but was lock'd out. That he dined not at home, but was locked out.CE V.i.256
He had my Lord, and when he ran in heere, He had, my lord, and when he ran in hereCE V.i.258
These people saw the Chaine about his necke. These people saw the chain about his neck.CE V.i.259
That is the Chaine sir, which you had of mee. That is the chain, sir, which you had of me.CE V.i.378
I thinke I did sir, I deny it not. I think I did, sir. I deny it not.CE V.i.381
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL