ADRIANA
Show:
Original textModern textKey line
Neither my husband nor the slaue return'd, Neither my husband nor the slave returned,CE II.i.1
That in such haste I sent to seeke his Master? That in such haste I sent to seek his master?CE II.i.2
Sure Luciana it is two a clocke. Sure, Luciana, it is two o'clock.CE II.i.3
Why should their libertie then ours be more? Why should their liberty than ours be more?CE II.i.10
Looke when I serue him so, he takes it thus. Look when I serve him so he takes it ill.CE II.i.12
There's none but asses will be bridled so. There's none but asses will be bridled so.CE II.i.14
This seruitude makes you to keepe vnwed. This servitude makes you to keep unwed.CE II.i.26
But were you wedded, you wold bear some sway But were you wedded, you would bear some sway.CE II.i.28
How if your husband start some other where? How if your husband start some otherwhere?CE II.i.30
Patience vnmou'd, no maruel though she pause, Patience unmoved! No marvel though she pause.CE II.i.32
They can be meeke, that haue no other cause: They can be meek that have no other cause.CE II.i.33
A wretched soule bruis'd with aduersitie, A wretched soul, bruised with adversity,CE II.i.34
We bid be quiet when we heare it crie. We bid be quiet when we hear it cry.CE II.i.35
But were we burdned with like waight of paine, But were we burdened with like weight of pain,CE II.i.36
As much, or more, we should our selues complaine: As much or more we should ourselves complain.CE II.i.37
So thou that hast no vnkinde mate to greeue thee, So thou, that hast no unkind mate to grieve thee,CE II.i.38
With vrging helpelesse patience would releeue me; With urging helpless patience would relieve me.CE II.i.39
But if thou liue to see like right bereft, But if thou live to see like right bereft,CE II.i.40
This foole-beg'd patience in thee will be left. This fool-begged patience in thee will be left.CE II.i.41
Say, is your tardie master now at hand? Say, is your tardy master now at hand?CE II.i.44
Say, didst thou speake with him? knowst thou his minde? Say, didst thou speak with him? Knowest thou his mind?CE II.i.47
But say, I prethee, is he comming home? But say, I prithee, is he coming home?CE II.i.55
It seemes he hath great care to please his wife.  It seems he hath great care to please his wife.CE II.i.56
Horne mad, thou villaine? Horn-mad, thou villain?CE II.i.58.1
Go back againe, thou slaue, & fetch him home. Go back again, thou slave, and fetch him home.CE II.i.75
Backe slaue, or I will breake thy pate a-crosse. Back, slave, or I will break thy pate across.CE II.i.78
Hence prating pesant, fetch thy Master home. Hence, prating peasant, fetch thy master home.CE II.i.81
His company must do his minions grace, His company must do his minions graceCE II.i.87
Whil'st I at home starue for a merrie looke: Whilst I at home starve for a merry look.CE II.i.88
Hath homelie age th' alluring beauty tooke Hath homely age the alluring beauty tookCE II.i.89
From my poore cheeke? then he hath wasted it. From my poor cheek? Then he hath wasted it.CE II.i.90
Are my discourses dull? Barren my wit, Are my discourses dull? barren my wit?CE II.i.91
If voluble and sharpe discourse be mar'd, If voluble and sharp discourse be marred,CE II.i.92
Vnkindnesse blunts it more then marble hard. Unkindness blunts it more than marble hard.CE II.i.93
Doe their gay vestments his affections baite? Do their gay vestments his affections bait?CE II.i.94
That's not my fault, hee's master of my state. That's not my fault; he's master of my state.CE II.i.95
What ruines are in me that can be found, What ruins are in me that can be foundCE II.i.96
By him not ruin'd? Then is he the ground By him not ruined? Then is he the groundCE II.i.97
Of my defeatures. My decayed faire, Of my defeatures. My decayed fairCE II.i.98
A sunnie looke of his, would soone repaire. A sunny look of his would soon repair.CE II.i.99
But, too vnruly Deere, he breakes the pale, But, too unruly deer, he breaks the paleCE II.i.100
And feedes from home; poore I am but his stale. And feeds from home. Poor I am but his stale.CE II.i.101
Vnfeeling fools can with such wrongs dispence: Unfeeling fools can with such wrongs dispense.CE II.i.103
I know his eye doth homage other-where, I know his eye doth homage otherwhere,CE II.i.104
Or else, what lets it but he would be here? Or else what lets it but he would be here?CE II.i.105
Sister, you know he promis'd me a chaine, Sister, you know he promised me a chain.CE II.i.106
Would that alone, a loue he would detaine, Would that alone a love he would detainCE II.i.107
So he would keepe faire quarter with his bed: So he would keep fair quarter with his bed.CE II.i.108
I see the Iewell best enamaled I see the jewel best enamelledCE II.i.109
Will loose his beautie: yet the gold bides still Will lose his beauty. Yet the gold bides stillCE II.i.110
That others touch, and often touching will, That others touch; and often touching willCE II.i.111
Where gold and no man that hath a name, Wear gold, and no man that hath a nameCE II.i.112
By falshood and corruption doth it shame: But falsehood and corruption doth it shame.CE II.i.113
Since that my beautie cannot please his eie, Since that my beauty cannot please his eye,CE II.i.114
Ile weepe (what's left away) and weeping die. I'll weep what's left away, and weeping die.CE II.i.115
I, I, Antipholus, looke strange and frowne, Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown.CE II.ii.119
Some other Mistresse hath thy sweet aspects: Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects.CE II.ii.120
I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. I am not Adriana, nor thy wife.CE II.ii.121
The time was once, when thou vn-vrg'd wouldst vow, The time was once when thou unurged wouldst vowCE II.ii.122
That neuer words were musicke to thine eare, That never words were music to thine ear,CE II.ii.123
That neuer obiect pleasing in thine eye, That never object pleasing in thine eye,CE II.ii.124
That neuer touch well welcome to thy hand, That never touch well welcome to thy hand,CE II.ii.125
That neuer meat sweet-sauour'd in thy taste, That never meat sweet-savoured in thy taste,CE II.ii.126
Vnlesse I spake, or look'd, or touch'd, or caru'd to thee. Unless I spake, or looked, or touched, or carved to thee.CE II.ii.127
How comes it now, my Husband, oh how comes it, How comes it now, my husband, O how comes it,CE II.ii.128
That thou art then estranged from thy selfe? That thou art then estranged from thyself?CE II.ii.129
Thy selfe I call it, being strange to me: Thyself I call it, being strange to meCE II.ii.130
That vndiuidable Incorporate That, undividable, incorporate,CE II.ii.131
Am better then thy deere selfes better part. Am better than thy dear self's better part.CE II.ii.132
Ah doe not teare away thy selfe from me; Ah, do not tear away thyself from me;CE II.ii.133
For know my loue: as easie maist thou fall For know, my love, as easy mayst thou fallCE II.ii.134
A drop of water in the breaking gulfe, A drop of water in the breaking gulf,CE II.ii.135
And take vnmingled thence that drop againe And take unmingled thence that drop againCE II.ii.136
Without addition or diminishing, Without addition or diminishing,CE II.ii.137
As take from me thy selfe, and not me too. As take from me thyself, and not me too.CE II.ii.138
How deerely would it touch thee to the quicke, How dearly would it touch me to the quickCE II.ii.139
Shouldst thou but heare I were licencious? Shouldst thou but hear I were licentious,CE II.ii.140
And that this body consecrate to thee, And that this body consecrate to theeCE II.ii.141
By Ruffian Lust should be contaminate? By ruffian lust should be contaminate?CE II.ii.142
Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurne at me, Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurn at me,CE II.ii.143
And hurle the name of husband in my face, And hurl the name of husband in my face,CE II.ii.144
And teare the stain'd skin of my Harlot brow, And tear the stained skin off my harlot brow,CE II.ii.145
And from my false hand cut the wedding ring, And from my false hand cut the wedding ring,CE II.ii.146
And breake it with a deepe-diuorcing vow? And break it with a deep-divorcing vow?CE II.ii.147
I know thou canst, and therefore see thou doe it. I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it!CE II.ii.148
I am possest with an adulterate blot, I am possessed with an adulterate blot.CE II.ii.149
My bloud is mingled with the crime of lust: My blood is mingled with the crime of lust;CE II.ii.150
For if we two be one, and thou play false, For if we two be one, and thou play false,CE II.ii.151
I doe digest the poison of thy flesh, I do digest the poison of thy flesh,CE II.ii.152
Being strumpeted by thy contagion: Being strumpeted by thy contagion.CE II.ii.153
Keepe then faire league and truce with thy true bed, Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed,CE II.ii.154
I liue distain'd, thou vndishonoured. I live unstained, thou undishonoured.CE II.ii.155
By thee, and this thou didst returne from him. By thee; and this thou didst return from him:CE II.ii.166
That he did buffet thee, and in his blowes, That he did buffet thee, and in his blowsCE II.ii.167
Denied my house for his, me for his wife. Denied my house for his, me for his wife.CE II.ii.168
How ill agrees it with your grauitie, How ill agrees it with your gravityCE II.ii.177
To counterfeit thus grosely with your slaue, To counterfeit thus grossly with your slave,CE II.ii.178
Abetting him to thwart me in my moode; Abetting him to thwart me in my mood.CE II.ii.179
Be it my wrong, you are from me exempt, Be it my wrong you are from me exempt;CE II.ii.180
But wrong not that wrong with a more contempt. But wrong not that wrong with a more contempt.CE II.ii.181
Come I will fasten on this sleeue of thine: Come, I will fasten on this sleeve of thine.CE II.ii.182
Thou art an Elme my husband, I a Vine: Thou art an elm, my husband; I a vine,CE II.ii.183
Whose weaknesse married to thy stranger state, Whose weakness, married to thy stronger state,CE II.ii.184
Makes me with thy strength to communicate: Makes me with thy strength to communicate.CE II.ii.185
If ought possesse thee from me, it is drosse, If aught possess thee from me, it is dross,CE II.ii.186
Vsurping Iuie, Brier, or idle Mosse, Usurping ivy, brier, or idle moss,CE II.ii.187
Who all for want of pruning, with intrusion, Who, all for want of pruning, with intrusionCE II.ii.188
Infect thy sap, and liue on thy confusion. Infect thy sap, and live on thy confusion.CE II.ii.189
Come, come, no longer will I be a foole, Come, come, no longer will I be a fool,CE II.ii.213
To put the finger in the eie and weepe; To put the finger in the eye and weepCE II.ii.214
Whil'st man and Master laughes my woes to scorne: Whilst man and master laughs my woes to scorn.CE II.ii.215
Come sir to dinner, Dromio keepe the gate: Come, sir, to dinner. – Dromio, keep the gate. – CE II.ii.216
Husband Ile dine aboue with you to day, Husband, I'll dine above with you today,CE II.ii.217
And shriue you of a thousand idle prankes: And shrive you of a thousand idle pranks. – CE II.ii.218
Sirra, if any aske you for your Master, Sirrah, if any ask you for your master,CE II.ii.219
Say he dines forth, and let no creature enter: Say he dines forth, and let no creature enter. – CE II.ii.220
Come sister, Dromio play the Porter well. Come, sister. – Dromio, play the porter well.CE II.ii.221
I, and let none enter, least I breake your pate. Ay, and let none enter, lest I break your pate.CE II.ii.228
Who is that at the doore yt keeps all this noise? Who is that at the door that keeps all this noise?CE III.i.61
Your wife sir knaue? go get you from the dore. Your wife, sir knave? Go get you from the door.CE III.i.64
Ah Luciana, did he tempt thee so? Ah, Luciana, did he tempt thee so?CE IV.ii.1
Might'st thou perceiue austeerely in his eie, Mightst thou perceive austerely in his eyeCE IV.ii.2
That he did plead in earnest, yea or no: That he did plead in earnest, yea or no?CE IV.ii.3
Look'd he or red or pale, or sad or merrily? Looked he or red or pale, or sad or merrily?CE IV.ii.4
What obseruation mad'st thou in this case? What observation madest thou in this caseCE IV.ii.5
Oh, his hearts Meteors tilting in his face. Of his heart's meteors tilting in his face?CE IV.ii.6
He meant he did me none: the more my spight He meant he did me none, the more my spite.CE IV.ii.8
And true he swore, though yet forsworne hee were. And true he swore, though yet forsworn he were.CE IV.ii.10
And what said he? And what said he?CE IV.ii.11.2
With what perswasion did he tempt thy loue? With what persuasion did he tempt thy love?CE IV.ii.13
Did'st speake him faire? Didst speak him fair?CE IV.ii.16.1
I cannot, nor I will not hold me still. I cannot nor I will not hold me still.CE IV.ii.17
My tongue, though not my heart, shall haue his will. My tongue, though not my heart, shall have his will.CE IV.ii.18
He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere, He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere;CE IV.ii.19
Ill-fac'd, worse bodied, shapelesse euery where: Ill-faced, worse-bodied, shapeless everywhere;CE IV.ii.20
Vicious, vngentle, foolish, blunt, vnkinde, Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,CE IV.ii.21
Stigmaticall in making worse in minde. Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.CE IV.ii.22
Ah but I thinke him better then I say: Ah, but I think him better than I say,CE IV.ii.25
And yet would herein others eies were worse: And yet would herein others' eyes were worse.CE IV.ii.26
Farre from her nest the Lapwing cries away; Far from her nest the lapwing cries away.CE IV.ii.27
My heart praies for him, though my tongue doe curse. My heart prays for him, though my tongue do curse.CE IV.ii.28
Where is thy Master Dromio? Is he well? Where is thy master, Dromio? Is he well?CE IV.ii.31
Why man, what is the matter? Why, man, what is the matter?CE IV.ii.41
What is he arrested? tell me at whose suite? What, is he arrested? Tell me at whose suit.CE IV.ii.43
Go fetch it Sister: Go fetch it, sister.CE IV.ii.47.1
this I wonder at.This I wonder at,CE IV.ii.47.2
Thus he vnknowne to me should be in debt: That he unknown to me should be in debt.CE IV.ii.48
Tell me, was he arested on a band? Tell me, was he arrested on a band?CE IV.ii.49
What, the chaine? What, the chain?CE IV.ii.52.1
The houres come backe, that did I neuer here. The hours come back – that did I never hear.CE IV.ii.54
As if time were in debt: how fondly do'st thou reason? As if time were in debt. How fondly dost thou reason!CE IV.ii.56
Go Dromio, there's the monie, beare it straight, Go, Dromio, there's the money. Bear it straight,CE IV.ii.62
And bring thy Master home imediately. And bring thy master home immediately.CE IV.ii.63
Come sister, I am prest downe with conceit: Come, sister, I am pressed down with conceit – CE IV.ii.64
Conceit, my comfort and my iniurie.Conceit, my comfort and my injury.CE IV.ii.65
His inciuility confirmes no lesse: His incivility confirms no less.CE IV.iv.44
Good Doctor Pinch, you are a Coniurer, Good Doctor Pinch, you are a conjuror.CE IV.iv.45
Establish him in his true sence againe, Establish him in his true sense again,CE IV.iv.46
And I will please you what you will demand. And I will please you what you will demand.CE IV.iv.47
Oh that thou wer't not, poore distressed soule. O that thou wert not, poor distressed soul!CE IV.iv.57
O husband, God doth know you din'd at home O, husband, God doth know you dined at home,CE IV.iv.63
Where would you had remain'd vntill this time, Where would you had remained until this time,CE IV.iv.64
Free from these slanders, and this open shame. Free from these slanders and this open shame.CE IV.iv.65
Is't good to sooth him in these contraries? Is't good to soothe him in these contraries?CE IV.iv.77
Alas, I sent you Monie to redeeme you, Alas, I sent you money to redeem you,CE IV.iv.81
By Dromio heere, who came in hast for it. By Dromio here, who came in haste for it.CE IV.iv.82
He came to me, and I deliuer'd it. He came to me, and I delivered it.CE IV.iv.86
I did not gentle husband locke thee forth. I did not, gentle husband, lock thee forth.CE IV.iv.95
Dissembling Villain, thou speak'st false in both Dissembling villain, thou speakest false in both.CE IV.iv.98
Oh binde him, binde him, let him not come neere me. O, bind him, bind him, let him not come near me!CE IV.iv.104
What wilt thou do, thou peeuish Officer? What wilt thou do, thou peevish officer?CE IV.iv.112
Hast thou delight to see a wretched man Hast thou delight to see a wretched manCE IV.iv.113
Do outrage and displeasure to himselfe? Do outrage and displeasure to himself?CE IV.iv.114
I will discharge thee ere I go from thee, I will discharge thee ere I go from thee.CE IV.iv.117
Beare me forthwith vnto his Creditor, Bear me forthwith unto his creditor,CE IV.iv.118
And knowing how the debt growes I will pay it. And, knowing how the debt grows, I will pay it.CE IV.iv.119
Good Master Doctor see him safe conuey'd Good Master Doctor, see him safe conveyedCE IV.iv.120
Home to my house, oh most vnhappy day. Home to my house. O most unhappy day!CE IV.iv.121
Go beare him hence, sister go you with me: Go bear him hence. Sister, go you with me.CE IV.iv.128
Say now, whose suite is he arrested at? Say now, whose suit is he arrested at?CE IV.iv.129
I know the man: what is the summe he owes? I know the man. What is the sum he owes?CE IV.iv.131
Say, how growes it due. Say, how grows it due?CE IV.iv.132.2
He did bespeake a Chain for me, but had it not. He did bespeak a chain for me, but had it not.CE IV.iv.134
It may be so, but I did neuer see it. It may be so, but I did never see it.CE IV.iv.139
Come Iailor, bring me where the Goldsmith is, Come, gaoler, bring me where the goldsmith is.CE IV.iv.140
I long to know the truth heereof at large. I long to know the truth hereof at large.CE IV.iv.141
And come with naked swords, Let's call more helpe And come with naked swords. Let's call more helpCE IV.iv.143
to haue them bound againe. Runne all out.To have them bound again.CE IV.iv.144.1
Hold, hurt him not for God sake, he is mad, Hold, hurt him not, for God's sake; he is mad.CE V.i.33
Some get within him, take his sword away: Some get within him, take his sword away.CE V.i.34
Binde Dromio too, and beare them to my house. Bind Dromio too, and bear them to my house.CE V.i.35
To fetch my poore distracted husband hence, To fetch my poor distracted husband hence.CE V.i.39
Let vs come in, that we may binde him fast, Let us come in, that we may bind him fastCE V.i.40
And beare him home for his recouerie. And bear him home for his recovery.CE V.i.41
This weeke he hath beene heauie, sower sad, This week he hath been heavy, sour, sad,CE V.i.45
And much different from the man he was: And much, much different from the man he was.CE V.i.46
But till this afternoone his passion But till this afternoon his passionCE V.i.47
Ne're brake into extremity of rage. Ne'er brake into extremity of rage.CE V.i.48
To none of these, except it be the last, To none of these except it be the last,CE V.i.55
Namely, some loue that drew him oft from home. Namely some love that drew him oft from home.CE V.i.56
Why so I did. Why, so I did.CE V.i.58.1
As roughly as my modestie would let me. As roughly as my modesty would let me.CE V.i.59
And in assemblies too. And in assemblies, too.CE V.i.60.2
It was the copie of our Conference. It was the copy of our conference.CE V.i.62
In bed he slept not for my vrging it, In bed he slept not for my urging it.CE V.i.63
At boord he fed not for my vrging it: At board he fed not for my urging it.CE V.i.64
Alone, it was the subiect of my Theame: Alone, it was the subject of my theme;CE V.i.65
In company I often glanced it: In company I often glanced at it.CE V.i.66
Still did I tell him, it was vilde and bad. Still did I tell him it was vile and bad.CE V.i.67
She did betray me to my owne reproofe, She did betray me to my own reproof.CE V.i.90
Good people enter, and lay hold on him. Good people, enter, and lay hold on him.CE V.i.91
Then let your seruants bring my husband forth Then let your servants bring my husband forth.CE V.i.93
I will attend my husband, be his nurse, I will attend my husband, be his nurse,CE V.i.98
Diet his sicknesse, for it is my Office, Diet his sickness, for it is my office,CE V.i.99
And will haue no atturney but my selfe, And will have no attorney but myself.CE V.i.100
And therefore let me haue him home with me. And therefore let me have him home with me.CE V.i.101
I will not hence, and leaue my husband heere: I will not hence and leave my husband here.CE V.i.109
And ill it doth beseeme your holinesse And ill it doth beseem your holinessCE V.i.110
To separate the husband and the wife. To separate the husband and the wife.CE V.i.111
Come go, I will fall prostrate at his feete, Come, go. I will fall prostrate at his feet,CE V.i.114
And neuer rise vntill my teares and prayers And never rise until my tears and prayersCE V.i.115
Haue won his grace to come in person hither, Have won his grace to come in person hitherCE V.i.116
And take perforce my husband from the Abbesse. And take perforce my husband from the Abbess.CE V.i.117
Iustice most sacred Duke against the Abbesse. Justice, most sacred Duke, against the Abbess!CE V.i.133
May it please your Grace, Antipholus my husbãd, May it please your grace, Antipholus my husband,CE V.i.136
Who I made Lord of me, and all I had, Who I made lord of me and all I hadCE V.i.137
At your important Letters this ill day, At your important letters, this ill dayCE V.i.138
A most outragious fit of madnesse tooke him: A most outrageous fit of madness took him,CE V.i.139
That desp'rately he hurried through the streete, That desperately he hurried through the street,CE V.i.140
With him his bondman, all as mad as he, With him his bondman all as mad as he,CE V.i.141
Doing displeasure to the Citizens, Doing displeasure to the citizensCE V.i.142
By rushing in their houses: bearing thence By rushing in their houses, bearing thenceCE V.i.143
Rings, Iewels, any thing his rage did like. Rings, jewels, anything his rage did like.CE V.i.144
Once did I get him bound, and sent him home, Once did I get him bound, and sent him homeCE V.i.145
Whil'st to take order for the wrongs I went, Whilst to take order for the wrongs I went,CE V.i.146
That heere and there his furie had committed, That here and there his fury had committed.CE V.i.147
Anon I wot not, by what strong escape Anon, I wot not by what strong escape,CE V.i.148
He broke from those that had the guard of him, He broke from those that had the guard of him,CE V.i.149
And with his mad attendant and himselfe, And with his mad attendant and himself,CE V.i.150
Each one with irefull passion, with drawne swords Each one with ireful passion, with drawn swordsCE V.i.151
Met vs againe, and madly bent on vs Met us again, and, madly bent on us,CE V.i.152
Chac'd vs away: till raising of more aide Chased us away; till, raising of more aid,CE V.i.153
We came againe to binde them: then they fled We came again to bind them. Then they fledCE V.i.154
Into this Abbey, whether we pursu'd them, Into this abbey, whither we pursued them,CE V.i.155
And heere the Abbesse shuts the gates on vs, And here the Abbess shuts the gates on us,CE V.i.156
And will not suffer vs to fetch him out, And will not suffer us to fetch him out,CE V.i.157
Nor send him forth, that we may beare him hence. Nor send him forth that we may bear him hence.CE V.i.158
Therefore most gracious Duke with thy command, Therefore, most gracious Duke, with thy commandCE V.i.159
Let him be brought forth, and borne hence for helpe. Let him be brought forth, and borne hence for help.CE V.i.160
Peace foole, thy Master and his man are here, Peace, fool; thy master and his man are here,CE V.i.178
And that is false thou dost report to vs. And that is false thou dost report to us.CE V.i.179
Ay me, it is my husband: witnesse you, Ay me, it is my husband. Witness youCE V.i.186
That he is borne about inuisible, That he is borne about invisible.CE V.i.187
Euen now we hous'd him in the Abbey heere. Even now we housed him in the abbey here,CE V.i.188
And now he's there, past thought of humane reason. And now he's there, past thought of human reason.CE V.i.189
No my good Lord. My selfe, he, and my sister, No, my good lord. Myself, he, and my sisterCE V.i.207
To day did dine together: so befall my soule, Today did dine together. So befall my soulCE V.i.208
As this is false he burthens me withall. As this is false he burdens me withal.CE V.i.209
I see two husbands, or mine eyes deceiue me. I see two husbands, or mine eyes deceive me.CE V.i.332
Which of you two did dine with me to day? Which of you two did dine with me today?CE V.i.370
And are not you my husband? And are not you my husband?CE V.i.371.2
I sent you monie sir to be your baile I sent you money, sir, to be your bailCE V.i.382
By Dromio, but I thinke he brought it not. By Dromio, but I think he brought it not.CE V.i.383
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL