PETRUCHIO
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Verona, for a while I take my leaue,Verona, for a while I take my leave,TS I.ii.1
To see my friends in Padua; but of allTo see my friends in Padua, but of allTS I.ii.2
My best beloued and approued friendMy best beloved and approved friend,TS I.ii.3
Hortensio: & I trow this is his house:Hortensio; and I trow this is his house.TS I.ii.4
Heere sirra Grumio, knocke I say.Here, sirrah Grumio, knock, I say.TS I.ii.5
Villaine I say, knocke me heere soundly.Villain, I say, knock me here soundly.TS I.ii.8
Villaine I say, knocke me at this gate,Villain, I say, knock me at this gate,TS I.ii.11
And rap me well, or Ile knocke your knaues pate.And rap me well, or I'll knock your knave's pate.TS I.ii.12
Will it not be?Will it not be?TS I.ii.15
'Faith sirrah, and you'l not knocke, Ile ring it,Faith, sirrah, an you'll not knock, I'll ring it.TS I.ii.16
Ile trie how you can Sol,Fa, and sing it.I'll try how you can sol-fa and sing it.TS I.ii.17
Now knocke when I bid you: sirrah villaine.Now knock when I bid you, sirrah villain.TS I.ii.19
Signior Hortensio, come you to part the fray?Signor Hortensio, come you to part the fray?TS I.ii.23
Contutti le core bene trobatto, may I say.Con tutto il cuore ben trovato, may I say.TS I.ii.24
A sencelesse villaine: good Hortensio,A senseless villain. Good Hortensio,TS I.ii.36
I bad the rascall knocke vpon your gate,I bade the rascal knock upon your gate,TS I.ii.37
And could not get him for my heart to do it.And could not get him for my heart to do it.TS I.ii.38
Sirra be gone, or talke not I aduise you.Sirrah, be gone, or talk not, I advise you.TS I.ii.43
Such wind as scatters yongmen throgh ye world,Such wind as scatters young men through the worldTS I.ii.49
To seeke their fortunes farther then at home,To seek their fortunes farther than at home,TS I.ii.50
Where small experience growes but in a few.Where small experience grows. But in a few,TS I.ii.51
Signior Hortensio, thus it stands with me,Signor Hortensio, thus it stands with me:TS I.ii.52
Antonio my father is deceast,Antonio, my father, is deceased,TS I.ii.53
And I haue thrust my selfe into this maze,And I have thrust myself into this maze,TS I.ii.54
Happily to wiue and thriue, as best I may:Haply to wive and thrive as best I may.TS I.ii.55
Crownes in my purse I haue, and goods at home,Crowns in my purse I have, and goods at home,TS I.ii.56
And so am come abroad to see the world.And so am come abroad to see the world.TS I.ii.57
Signior Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as wee,Signor Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as weTS I.ii.64
Few words suffice: and therefore, if thou knowFew words suffice; and therefore, if thou knowTS I.ii.65
One rich enough to be Petruchio's wife:One rich enough to be Petruchio's wife – TS I.ii.66
(As wealth is burthen of my woing dance)As wealth is burden of my wooing dance – TS I.ii.67
Be she as foule as was Florentius Loue,Be she as foul as was Florentius' love,TS I.ii.68
As old as Sibell, and as curst and shrow'dAs old as Sibyl, and as curst and shrewdTS I.ii.69
As Socrates Zentippe, or a worse:As Socrates' Xanthippe, or a worse,TS I.ii.70
She moues me not, or not remoues at leastShe moves me not, or not removes at leastTS I.ii.71
Affections edge in me. Were she is as roughAffection's edge in me, were she as roughTS I.ii.72
As are the swelling Adriaticke seas.As are the swelling Adriatic seas.TS I.ii.73
I come to wiue it wealthily in Padua:I come to wive it wealthily in Padua;TS I.ii.74
If wealthily, then happily in Padua.If wealthily, then happily in Padua.TS I.ii.75
Hortensio peace: thou knowst not golds effect,Hortensio, peace. Thou know'st not gold's effect.TS I.ii.92
Tell me her fathers name, and 'tis enough:Tell me her father's name and 'tis enough.TS I.ii.93
For I will boord her, though she chide as loudFor I will board her though she chide as loudTS I.ii.94
As thunder, when the clouds in Autumne cracke.As thunder when the clouds in autumn crack.TS I.ii.95
I know her father, though I know not her,I know her father, though I know not her,TS I.ii.100
And he knew my deceased father well:And he knew my deceased father well.TS I.ii.101
I wil not sleepe Hortensio til I see her,I will not sleep, Hortensio, till I see her,TS I.ii.102
And therefore let me be thus bold with you,And therefore let me be thus bold with youTS I.ii.103
To giue you ouer at this first encounter,To give you over at this first encounter,TS I.ii.104
Vnlesse you wil accompanie me thither.Unless you will accompany me thither.TS I.ii.105
Peace sirra.Peace, sirrah.TS I.ii.159
I know she is an irkesome brawling scold:I know she is an irksome brawling scold.TS I.ii.185
If that be all Masters, I heare no harme.If that be all, masters, I hear no harm.TS I.ii.186
Borne in Verona, old Butonios sonne:Born in Verona, old Antonio's son.TS I.ii.188
My father dead, my fortune liues for me,My father dead, my fortune lives for me,TS I.ii.189
And I do hope, good dayes and long, to see.And I do hope good days and long to see.TS I.ii.190
Will I liue?Will I live?TS I.ii.194.2
Why came I hither, but to that intent?Why came I hither but to that intent?TS I.ii.196
Thinke you, a little dinne can daunt mine eares?Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?TS I.ii.197
Haue I not in my time heard Lions rore?Have I not in my time heard lions roar?TS I.ii.198
Haue I not heard the sea, puft vp with windes,Have I not heard the sea, puffed up with winds,TS I.ii.199
Rage like an angry Boare, chafed with sweat?Rage like an angry boar chafed with sweat?TS I.ii.200
Haue I not heard great Ordnance in the field?Have I not heard great ordnance in the field,TS I.ii.201
And heauens Artillerie thunder in the skies?And heaven's artillery thunder in the skies?TS I.ii.202
Haue I not in a pitched battell heardHave I not in a pitched battle heardTS I.ii.203
Loud larums, neighing steeds, & trumpets clangue?Loud 'larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets' clang?TS I.ii.204
And do you tell me of a womans tongue?And do you tell me of a woman's tongue,TS I.ii.205
That giues not halfe so great a blow to heare,That gives not half so great a blow to hearTS I.ii.206
As wil a Chesse-nut in a Farmers fire.As will a chestnut in a farmer's fire?TS I.ii.207
Tush, tush, feare boyes with bugs.Tush, tush, fear boys with bugs!TS I.ii.208.1
Not her that chides sir, at any hand I pray.Not her that chides, sir, at any hand, I pray.TS I.ii.224
Hortensio, to what end are all these words?Hortensio, to what end are all these words?TS I.ii.247
Sir, sir, the first's for me, let her go by.Sir, sir, the first's for me, let her go by.TS I.ii.253
Sir vnderstand you this of me (insooth)Sir, understand you this of me in sooth,TS I.ii.256
The yongest daughter whom you hearken for,The youngest daughter whom you hearken forTS I.ii.257
Her father keepes from all accesse of sutors,Her father keeps from all access of suitors,TS I.ii.258
And will not promise her to any man,And will not promise her to any manTS I.ii.259
Vntill the elder sister first be wed.Until the elder sister first be wed.TS I.ii.260
The yonger then is free, and not before.The younger then is free, and not before.TS I.ii.261
And you good sir: pray haue you not a daughter, And you, good sir. Pray have you not a daughterTS II.i.42
cal'd Katerina, faire and vertuous.Called Katherina, fair and virtuous?TS II.i.43
You wrong me signior Gremio, giue me leaue.You wrong me, Signor Gremio, give me leave.TS II.i.46
I am a Gentleman of Verona sir,I am a gentleman of Verona, sir,TS II.i.47
That hearing of her beautie, and her wit,That hearing of her beauty and her wit,TS II.i.48
Her affability and bashfull modestie:Her affability and bashful modesty,TS II.i.49
Her wondrous qualities, and milde behauiour,Her wondrous qualities and mild behaviour,TS II.i.50
Am bold to shew my selfe a forward guestAm bold to show myself a forward guestTS II.i.51
Within your house, to make mine eye the witnesseWithin your house, to make mine eye the witnessTS II.i.52
Of that report, which I so oft haue heard,Of that report which I so oft have heard.TS II.i.53
And for an entrance to my entertainment,And for an entrance to my entertainmentTS II.i.54
I do present you with a man of mineI do present you with a man of mine,TS II.i.55
Cunning in Musicke, and the Mathematickes,Cunning in music and the mathematics,TS II.i.56
To instruct her fully in those sciences,To instruct her fully in those sciences,TS II.i.57
Whereof I know she is not ignorant,Whereof I know she is not ignorant.TS II.i.58
Accept of him, or else you do me wrong,Accept of him, or else you do me wrong.TS II.i.59
His name is Litio, borne in Mantua.His name is Licio, born in Mantua.TS II.i.60
I see you do not meane to part with her,I see you do not mean to part with her,TS II.i.64
Or else you like not of my companie.Or else you like not of my company.TS II.i.65
Petruchio is my name, Antonio's sonne,Petruchio is my name, Antonio's son,TS II.i.68
A man well knowne throughout all Italy.A man well known throughout all Italy.TS II.i.69
Oh, Pardon me signior Gremio, I would faine be doing.O pardon me, Signor Gremio, I would fain be doing.TS II.i.74
Signior Baptista, my businesse asketh haste,Signor Baptista, my business asketh haste,TS II.i.114
And euerie day I cannot come to woo,And every day I cannot come to woo.TS II.i.115
You knew my father well, and in him me,You knew my father well, and in him me,TS II.i.116
Left solie heire to all his Lands and goods,Left solely heir to all his lands and goods,TS II.i.117
Which I haue bettered rather then decreast,Which I have bettered rather than decreased.TS II.i.118
Then tell me, if I get your daughters loue,Then tell me, if I get your daughter's love,TS II.i.119
What dowrie shall I haue with her to wife.What dowry shall I have with her to wife?TS II.i.120
And for that dowrie, Ile assure her ofAnd, for that dowry I'll assure her ofTS II.i.123
Her widdow-hood, be it that she suruiue meHer widowhood – be it that she survive me – TS II.i.124
In all my Lands and Leases whatsoeuer,In all my lands and leases whatsoever.TS II.i.125
Let specialties be therefore drawne betweene vs,Let specialties be therefore drawn between us,TS II.i.126
That couenants may be kept on either hand.That covenants may be kept on either hand.TS II.i.127
Why that is nothing: for I tell you father,Why, that is nothing. For I tell you, father,TS II.i.130
I am as peremptorie as she proud minded:I am as peremptory as she proud-minded;TS II.i.131
And where two raging fires meete together,And where two raging fires meet together,TS II.i.132
They do consume the thing that feedes their furie.They do consume the thing that feeds their fury.TS II.i.133
Though little fire growes great with little winde,Though little fire grows great with little wind,TS II.i.134
yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all:Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all.TS II.i.135
So I to her, and so she yeelds to me,So I to her, and so she yields to me,TS II.i.136
For I am rough, and woo not like a babe.For I am rough and woo not like a babe.TS II.i.137
I to the proofe, as Mountaines are for windes,Ay, to the proof, as mountains are for winds,TS II.i.140
That shakes not, though they blow perpetually.That shakes not though they blow perpetually.TS II.i.141
Now by the world, it is a lustie Wench,Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench.TS II.i.160
I loue her ten times more then ere I did,I love her ten times more than e'er I did.TS II.i.161
Oh how I long to haue some chat with her.O, how I long to have some chat with her!TS II.i.162
I pray you do. I pray you do.TS II.i.168.1
Ile attend her heere,I'll attend her here,TS II.i.168.2
And woo her with some spirit when she comes,And woo her with some spirit when she comes.TS II.i.169
Say that she raile, why then Ile tell her plaine,Say that she rail, why then I'll tell her plainTS II.i.170
She sings as sweetly as a Nightinghale:She sings as sweetly as a nightingale.TS II.i.171
Say that she frowne, Ile say she lookes as cleereSay that she frown, I'll say she looks as clearTS II.i.172
As morning Roses newly washt with dew:As morning roses newly washed with dew.TS II.i.173
Say she be mute, and will not speake a word,Say she be mute and will not speak a word,TS II.i.174
Then Ile commend her volubility,Then I'll commend her volubility,TS II.i.175
And say she vttereth piercing eloquence:And say she uttereth piercing eloquence.TS II.i.176
If she do bid me packe, Ile giue her thankes,If she do bid me pack, I'll give her thanks,TS II.i.177
As though she bid me stay by her a weeke:As though she bid me stay by her a week.TS II.i.178
If she denie to wed, Ile craue the dayIf she deny to wed, I'll crave the dayTS II.i.179
When I shall aske the banes, and when be married.When I shall ask the banns, and when be married.TS II.i.180
But heere she comes, and now Petruchio speake.But here she comes, and now, Petruchio, speak.TS II.i.181
Good morrow Kate, for thats your name I heare.Good morrow, Kate – for that's your name, I hear.TS II.i.182
You lye infaith, for you are call'd plaine Kate,You lie, in faith, for you are called plain Kate,TS II.i.185
And bony Kate, and sometimes Kate the curst:And bonny Kate, and sometimes Kate the curst.TS II.i.186
But Kate, the prettiest Kate in Christendome,But Kate, the prettiest Kate in Christendom,TS II.i.187
Kate of Kate-hall, my super-daintie Kate,Kate of Kate Hall, my super-dainty Kate,TS II.i.188
For dainties are all Kates, and therefore KateFor dainties are all Kates, and therefore, Kate,TS II.i.189
Take this of me, Kate of my consolation,Take this of me, Kate of my consolation – TS II.i.190
Hearing thy mildnesse prais'd in euery Towne,Hearing thy mildness praised in every town,TS II.i.191
Thy vertues spoke of, and thy beautie sounded,Thy virtues spoke of, and thy beauty sounded,TS II.i.192
Yet not so deepely as to thee belongs,Yet not so deeply as to thee belongs,TS II.i.193
My selfe am moou'd to woo thee for my wife.Myself am moved to woo thee for my wife.TS II.i.194
Why, what's a mouable?Why, what's a movable?TS II.i.197.2
Thou hast hit it: come sit on me.Thou hast hit it. Come, sit on me.TS II.i.198.2
Women are made to beare, and so are you.Women are made to bear, and so are you.TS II.i.200
Alas good Kate, I will not burthen thee,Alas, good Kate, I will not burden thee!TS II.i.202
For knowing thee to be but yong and light.For knowing thee to be but young and light – TS II.i.203
Shold be, should: buzze.Should be? Should – buzz!TS II.i.206.1
Oh slow-wing'd Turtle, shal a buzard take thee?O slow-winged turtle, shall a buzzard take thee?TS II.i.207
Come, come you Waspe, y'faith you are too angrie.Come, come, you wasp, i'faith, you are too angry.TS II.i.209
My remedy is then to plucke it out.My remedy is then to pluck it out.TS II.i.211
Who knowes not where a Waspe does weare his sting? Who knows not where a wasp does wear his sting?TS II.i.213
In his taile.In his tail.TS II.i.214.1
Whose tongue.Whose tongue?TS II.i.214.3
What with my tongue in your taile. / Nay, come againe, What, with my tongue in your tail? Nay, come again.TS II.i.216
good Kate, I am a Gentleman,Good Kate, I am a gentleman – TS II.i.217.1
I sweare Ile cuffe you, if you strike againe.I swear I'll cuff you, if you strike again.TS II.i.218
A Herald Kate? Oh put me in thy bookes.A herald, Kate? O, put me in thy books!TS II.i.222
A comblesse Cocke, so Kate will be my Hen.A combless cock, so Kate will be my hen.TS II.i.224
Nay come Kate, come: you must not looke so sowre.Nay, come, Kate, come, you must not look so sour.TS II.i.226
Why heere's no crab, and therefore looke not sowre.Why, here's no crab, and therefore look not sour.TS II.i.228
Then shew it me.Then show it me.TS II.i.230.1
What, you meane my face.What, you mean my face?TS II.i.231.1
Now by S. George I am too yong for you.Now, by Saint George, I am too young for you.TS II.i.232
'Tis with cares.'Tis with cares.TS II.i.233.2
Nay heare you Kate. Nay, hear you, Kate – TS II.i.234.1
Insooth you scape not so.In sooth, you scape not so.TS II.i.234.2
No, not a whit, I finde you passing gentle:No, not a whit. I find you passing gentle.TS II.i.236
'Twas told me you were rough, and coy, and sullen,'Twas told me you were rough, and coy, and sullen,TS II.i.237
And now I finde report a very liar:And now I find report a very liar.TS II.i.238
For thou art pleasant, gamesome, passing courteous,For thou are pleasant, gamesome, passing courteous,TS II.i.239
But slow in speech: yet sweet as spring-time flowers.But slow in speech, yet sweet as spring-time flowers.TS II.i.240
Thou canst not frowne, thou canst not looke a sconce,Thou canst not frown, thou canst not look askance,TS II.i.241
Nor bite the lip, as angry wenches will,Nor bite the lip, as angry wenches will,TS II.i.242
Nor hast thou pleasure to be crosse in talke:Nor hast thou pleasure to be cross in talk.TS II.i.243
But thou with mildnesse entertain'st thy wooers,But thou with mildness entertain'st thy wooers,TS II.i.244
With gentle conference, soft, and affable.With gentle conference, soft and affable.TS II.i.245
Why does the world report that Kate doth limpe?Why does the world report that Kate doth limp?TS II.i.246
Oh sland'rous world: Kate like the hazle twigO slanderous world! Kate like the hazel-twigTS II.i.247
Is straight, and slender, and as browne in hueIs straight and slender, and as brown in hueTS II.i.248
As hazle nuts, and sweeter then the kernels:As hazel-nuts and sweeter than the kernels.TS II.i.249
Oh let me see thee walke: thou dost not halt.O, let me see thee walk. Thou dost not halt.TS II.i.250
Did euer Dian so become a GroueDid ever Dian so become a groveTS II.i.252
As Kate this chamber with her princely gate:As Kate this chamber with her princely gait?TS II.i.253
O be thou Dian, and let her be Kate,O, be thou Dian, and let her be Kate,TS II.i.254
And then let Kate be chaste, and Dian sportfull.And then let Kate be chaste and Dian sportful.TS II.i.255
It is extempore, from my mother wit.It is extempore, from my mother-wit.TS II.i.257
Am I not wise?Am I not wise?TS II.i.259.1
Marry so I meane sweet Katherine in thy bed:Marry, so I mean, sweet Katherine, in thy bed.TS II.i.260
And therefore setting all this chat aside,And therefore, setting all this chat aside,TS II.i.261
Thus in plaine termes: your father hath consentedThus in plain terms – your father hath consentedTS II.i.262
That you shall be my wife; your dowry greed on,That you shall be my wife; your dowry 'greed on;TS II.i.263
And will you, nill you, I will marry you.And will you, nill you, I will marry you.TS II.i.264
Now Kate, I am a husband for your turne,Now, Kate, I am a husband for your turn,TS II.i.265
For by this light, whereby I see thy beauty,For by this light whereby I see thy beauty,TS II.i.266
Thy beauty that doth make me like thee well,Thy beauty that doth make me like thee well,TS II.i.267
Thou must be married to no man but me,Thou must be married to no man but me.TS II.i.268
For I am he am borne to tame you Kate,For I am he am born to tame you, Kate,TS II.i.269
And bring you from a wilde Kate to a KateAnd bring you from a wild Kate to a KateTS II.i.270
Conformable as other houshold Kates:Conformable as other household Kates.TS II.i.271
Heere comes your father, neuer make deniall,Here comes your father. Never make denial;TS II.i.272
Imust, and will haue Katherine to my wife.I must and will have Katherine to my wife.TS II.i.273
How but well sir? how but well?How but well, sir? How but well?TS II.i.275
It were impossible I should speed amisse.It were impossible I should speed amiss.TS II.i.276
Father, 'tis thus, your selfe and all the worldFather, 'tis thus – yourself and all the worldTS II.i.283
That talk'd of her, haue talk'd amisse of her:That talked of her have talked amiss of her.TS II.i.284
If she be curst, it is for pollicie,If she be curst, it is for policy,TS II.i.285
For shee's not froward, but modest as the Doue,For she's not froward, but modest as the dove.TS II.i.286
Shee is not hot, but temperate as the morne,She is not hot, but temperate as the morn.TS II.i.287
For patience shee will proue a second Grissell,For patience she will prove a second Grissel,TS II.i.288
And Romane Lucrece for her chastitie:And Roman Lucrece for her chastity.TS II.i.289
And to conclude, we haue greed so well together,And to conclude, we have 'greed so well togetherTS II.i.290
That vpon sonday is the wedding day.That upon Sunday is the wedding-day.TS II.i.291
Be patient gentlemen, I choose her for my selfe,Be patient, gentlemen, I choose her for myself.TS II.i.295
If she and I be pleas'd, what's that to you?If she and I be pleased, what's that to you?TS II.i.296
'Tis bargain'd twixt vs twaine being alone,'Tis bargained 'twixt us twain, being alone,TS II.i.297
That she shall still be curst in company.That she shall still be curst in company.TS II.i.298
I tell you 'tis incredible to beleeueI tell you 'tis incredible to believeTS II.i.299
How much she loues me: oh the kindest Kate,How much she loves me – O, the kindest Kate!TS II.i.300
Shee hung about my necke, and kisse on kisseShe hung about my neck, and kiss on kissTS II.i.301
Shee vi'd so fast, protesting oath on oath,She vied so fast, protesting oath on oath,TS II.i.302
That in a twinke she won me to her loue.That in a twink she won me to her love.TS II.i.303
Oh you are nouices, 'tis a world to seeO, you are novices! 'Tis a world to seeTS II.i.304
How tame when men and women are alone,How tame, when men and women are alone,TS II.i.305
A meacocke wretch can make the curstest shrew:A meacock wretch can make the curstest shrew.TS II.i.306
Giue me thy hand Kate, I will vnto VeniceGive me thy hand, Kate, I will unto Venice,TS II.i.307
To buy apparell 'gainst the wedding day;To buy apparel 'gainst the wedding-day.TS II.i.308
Prouide the feast father, and bid the guests,Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests.TS II.i.309
I will be sure my Katherine shall be fine.I will be sure my Katherine shall be fine.TS II.i.310
Father, and wife, and gentlemen adieu,Father, and wife, and gentlemen, adieu,TS II.i.314
I will to Venice, sonday comes apace,I will to Venice – Sunday comes apace.TS II.i.315
We will haue rings, and things, and fine array,We will have rings, and things, and fine array,TS II.i.316
And kisse me Kate, we will be married a sonday.And kiss me, Kate, we will be married o' Sunday.TS II.i.317
Come, where be these gallants? who's at Come, where be these gallants? Who's atTS III.ii.84
home?home?TS III.ii.85
And yet I come not well.And yet I come not well?TS III.ii.87
Were it better I should rush in thus:Were it not better I should rush in thus?TS III.ii.90
But where is Kate? where is my louely Bride?But where is Kate? Where is my lovely bride?TS III.ii.91
How does my father? gentles methinkes you frowne,How does my father? Gentles, methinks you frown.TS III.ii.92
And wherefore gaze this goodly company,And wherefore gaze this goodly companyTS III.ii.93
As if they saw some wondrous monument,As if they saw some wondrous monument,TS III.ii.94
Some Commet, or vnusuall prodigie?Some comet, or unusual prodigy?TS III.ii.95
Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to heare,Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to hear – TS III.ii.104
Sufficeth I am come to keepe my word,Sufficeth I am come to keep my word,TS III.ii.105
Though in some part inforced to digresse,Though in some part enforced to digress,TS III.ii.106
Which at more leysure I will so excuse,Which at more leisure I will so excuseTS III.ii.107
As you shall well be satisfied with all.As you shall well be satisfied withal.TS III.ii.108
But where is Kate? I stay too long from her,But where is Kate? I stay too long from her.TS III.ii.109
The morning weares, 'tis time we were at Church.The morning wears, 'tis time we were at church.TS III.ii.110
Not I, beleeue me, thus Ile visit her.Not I, believe me. Thus I'll visit her.TS III.ii.113
Good sooth euen thus: therefore ha done with words,Good sooth, even thus. Therefore ha' done with words;TS III.ii.115
To me she's married, not vnto my cloathes:To me she's married, not unto my clothes.TS III.ii.116
Could I repaire what she will weare in me,Could I repair what she will wear in meTS III.ii.117
As I can change these poore accoutrements,As I can change these poor accoutrements,TS III.ii.118
'Twere well for Kate, and better for my selfe.'Twere well for Kate and better for myself.TS III.ii.119
But what a foole am I to chat with you,But what a fool am I to chat with you,TS III.ii.120
When I should bid good morrow to my Bride?When I should bid good morrow to my bride,TS III.ii.121
And seale the title with a louely kisse. And seal the title with a lovely kiss.TS III.ii.122
Gentlemen & friends, I thank you for your pains,Gentlemen and friends, I thank you for your pains.TS III.ii.183
I know you thinke to dine with me to day,I know you think to dine with me today,TS III.ii.184
And haue prepar'd great store of wedding cheere,And have prepared great store of wedding cheer,TS III.ii.185
But so it is, my haste doth call me hence,But so it is, my haste doth call me hence,TS III.ii.186
And therefore heere I meane to take my leaue.And therefore here I mean to take my leave.TS III.ii.187
I must away to day before night come,I must away today, before night come.TS III.ii.189
Make it no wonder: if you knew my businesse,Make it no wonder. If you knew my business,TS III.ii.190
You would intreat me rather goe then stay:You would entreat me rather go than stay.TS III.ii.191
And honest company, I thanke you all,And, honest company, I thank you allTS III.ii.192
That haue beheld me giue away my selfeThat have beheld me give away myselfTS III.ii.193
To this most patient, sweet, and vertuous wife,To this most patient, sweet, and virtuous wife.TS III.ii.194
Dine with my father, drinke a health to me,Dine with my father, drink a health to me,TS III.ii.195
For I must hence, and farewell to you all.For I must hence, and farewell to you all.TS III.ii.196
It may not be.It may not be.TS III.ii.198.1
It cannot be.It cannot be.TS III.ii.199.1
I am content.I am content.TS III.ii.200.1
I am content you shall entreat me stay,I am content you shall entreat me stay – TS III.ii.201
But yet not stay, entreat me how you can.But yet not stay, entreat me how you can.TS III.ii.202
Grumio, my horse.Grumio, my horse.TS III.ii.203.2
O Kate content thee, prethee be not angry.O Kate, content thee, prithee be not angry.TS III.ii.214
They shall goe forward Kate at thy command,They shall go forward, Kate, at thy command.TS III.ii.221
Obey the Bride you that attend on her.Obey the bride, you that attend on her.TS III.ii.222
Goe to the feast, reuell and domineere,Go to the feast, revel and domineer,TS III.ii.223
Carowse full measure to her maiden-head,Carouse full measure to her maidenhead,TS III.ii.224
Be madde and merry, or goe hang your selues:Be mad and merry, or go hang yourselves.TS III.ii.225
But for my bonny Kate, she must with me:But for my bonny Kate, she must with me.TS III.ii.226
Nay, looke not big, nor stampe, nor stare, nor fret,Nay, look not big, nor stamp, nor stare, nor fret,TS III.ii.227
I will be master of what is mine owne,I will be master of what is mine own.TS III.ii.228
Shee is my goods, my chattels, she is my house,She is my goods, my chattels, she is my house,TS III.ii.229
My houshold-stuffe, my field, my barne,My household stuff, my field, my barn,TS III.ii.230
My horse, my oxe, my asse, my any thing,My horse, my ox, my ass, my any thing,TS III.ii.231
And heere she stands, touch her who euer dare,And here she stands. Touch her whoever dare!TS III.ii.232
Ile bring mine action on the proudest heI'll bring mine action on the proudest heTS III.ii.233
That stops my way in Padua: GrumioThat stops my way in Padua. Grumio,TS III.ii.234
Draw forth thy weapon, we are beset with theeues,Draw forth thy weapon, we are beset with thieves,TS III.ii.235
Rescue thy Mistresse if thou be a man:Rescue thy mistress if thou be a man.TS III.ii.236
Feare not sweet wench, they shall not touch thee Kate,Fear not, sweet wench, they shall not touch thee, Kate.TS III.ii.237
Ile buckler thee against a Million. I'll buckler thee against a million.TS III.ii.238
Where be these knaues? What no man at dooreWhere be these knaves? What, no man at doorTS IV.i.106
To hold my stirrop, nor to take my horse?To hold my stirrup nor to take my horse?TS IV.i.107
Where is Nathaniel, Gregory, Phillip.Where is Nathaniel, Gregory, Philip?TS IV.i.108
Heere sir, heere sir, heere sir, heere sir.Here sir, here sir, here sir, here sir!TS IV.i.110
You logger-headed and vnpollisht groomes:You logger-headed and unpolished grooms!TS IV.i.111
What? no attendance? no regard? no dutie?What, no attendance? No regard? No duty?TS IV.i.112
Where is the foolish knaue I sent before?Where is the foolish knave I sent before?TS IV.i.113
You pezant, swain, you horson malt-horse drudgYou peasant swain, you whoreson malt-horse drudge!TS IV.i.115
Did I not bid thee meete me in the Parke,Did I not bid thee meet me in the parkTS IV.i.116
And bring along these rascal knaues with thee?And bring along these rascal knaves with thee?TS IV.i.117
Go rascals, go, and fetch my supper in. Go, rascals, go and fetch my supper in.TS IV.i.125
Where is the life that late I led?Where is the life that late I led?TS IV.i.126
Where are those? Where are those – TS IV.i.127
Sit downe Kate, / And welcome. Soud, soud, soud, soud.Sit down, Kate, and welcome. Food, food, food, food!TS IV.i.128
Why when I say? Nay good sweete Kate be merrie.Why, when, I say? Nay, good sweet Kate, be merry.TS IV.i.129
Off with my boots, you rogues: you villaines, when?Off with my boots, you rogues! You villains, when?TS IV.i.130
It was the Friar of Orders gray,It was the friar of orders grey,TS IV.i.131
As he forth walked on his way.As he forth walked on his way – TS IV.i.132
Out you rogue, you plucke my foote awrie,Out, you rogue! You pluck my foot awry.TS IV.i.133
Take that, and mend the plucking of the other.Take that, and mend the plucking off the other.TS IV.i.134
Be merrie Kate: Some water heere: what hoa.Be merry, Kate. Some water here. What ho!TS IV.i.135
Where's my Spaniel Troilus? Sirra, get you hence,Where's my spaniel Troilus? Sirrah, get you hence,TS IV.i.136
And bid my cozen Ferdinand come hither:And bid my cousin Ferdinand come hither.TS IV.i.137
One Kate that you must kisse, and be acquainted with.One, Kate, that you must kiss and be acquainted with.TS IV.i.138
Where are my Slippers? Shall I haue some water?Where are my slippers? Shall I have some water?TS IV.i.139
Come Kate and wash, & welcome heartily:Come, Kate, and wash, and welcome heartily.TS IV.i.140
you horson villaine, will you let it fall?You whoreson villain, will you let it fall?TS IV.i.141
A horson beetle-headed flap-ear'd knaue:A whoreson, beetle-headed, flap-eared knave!TS IV.i.143
Come Kate sit downe, I know you haue a stomacke,Come, Kate, sit down, I know you have a stomach.TS IV.i.144
Will you giue thankes, sweete Kate, or else shall I?Will you give thanks, sweet Kate, or else shall I?TS IV.i.145
What's this, Mutton?What's this? Mutton?TS IV.i.146.1
Who brought it?Who brought it?TS IV.i.146.3
'Tis burnt, and so is all the meate:'Tis burnt, and so is all the meat.TS IV.i.147
What dogges are these? Where is the rascall Cooke?What dogs are these! Where is the rascal cook?TS IV.i.148
How durst you villaines bring it from the dresserHow durst you, villains, bring it from the dresserTS IV.i.149
And serue it thus to me that loue it not?And serve it thus to me that love it not?TS IV.i.150
There, take it to you, trenchers, cups, and all:There, take it to you, trenchers, cups, and all.TS IV.i.151
You heedlesse iolt-heads, and vnmanner'd slaues.You heedless joltheads and unmannered slaves!TS IV.i.152
What, do you grumble? Ile be with you straight.What, do you grumble? I'll be with you straight.TS IV.i.153
I tell thee Kate, 'twas burnt and dried away,I tell thee, Kate, 'twas burnt and dried away,TS IV.i.156
And I expressely am forbid to touch it:And I expressly am forbid to touch it,TS IV.i.157
For it engenders choller, planteth anger,For it engenders choler, planteth anger;TS IV.i.158
And better 'twere that both of vs did fast,And better 'twere that both of us did fast,TS IV.i.159
Since of our selues, our selues are chollericke,Since, of ourselves, ourselves are choleric,TS IV.i.160
Then feede it with such ouer-rosted flesh:Than feed it with such over-roasted flesh.TS IV.i.161
Be patient, to morrow't shalbe mended,Be patient, tomorrow't shall be mended,TS IV.i.162
And for this night we'l fast for companie.And for this night we'll fast for company.TS IV.i.163
Come I wil bring thee to thy Bridall chamber. Come, I will bring thee to thy bridal chamber.TS IV.i.164
Thus haue I politickely begun my reigne,Thus have I politicly begun my reign,TS IV.i.174
And 'tis my hope to end successefully:And 'tis my hope to end successfully.TS IV.i.175
My Faulcon now is sharpe, and passing emptie,My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,TS IV.i.176
And til she stoope, she must not be full gorg'd,And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,TS IV.i.177
For then she neuer lookes vpon her lure.For then she never looks upon her lure.TS IV.i.178
Another way I haue to man my Haggard,Another way I have to man my haggard,TS IV.i.179
To make her come, and know her Keepers call:To make her come and know her keeper's call,TS IV.i.180
That is, to watch her, as we watch these Kites,That is, to watch her, as we watch these kitesTS IV.i.181
That baite, and beate, and will not be obedient:That bate and beat and will not be obedient.TS IV.i.182
She eate no meate to day, nor none shall eate.She eat no meat today, nor none shall eat.TS IV.i.183
Last night she slept not, nor to night she shall not:Last night she slept not, nor tonight she shall not.TS IV.i.184
As with the meate, some vndeserued faultAs with the meat, some undeserved faultTS IV.i.185
Ile finde about the making of the bed,I'll find about the making of the bed,TS IV.i.186
And heere Ile fling the pillow, there the boulster,And here I'll fling the pillow, there the bolster,TS IV.i.187
This way the Couerlet, another way the sheets:This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.TS IV.i.188
I, and amid this hurlie I intend,Ay, and amid this hurly I intendTS IV.i.189
That all is done in reuerend care of her,That all is done in reverend care of her.TS IV.i.190
And in conclusion, she shal watch all night,And, in conclusion, she shall watch all night,TS IV.i.191
And if she chance to nod, Ile raile and brawle,And if she chance to nod I'll rail and brawl,TS IV.i.192
And with the clamor keepe her stil awake:And with the clamour keep her still awake.TS IV.i.193
This is a way to kil a Wife with kindnesse,This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,TS IV.i.194
And thus Ile curbe her mad and headstrong humor:And thus I'll curb her mad and headstrong humour.TS IV.i.195
He that knowes better how to tame a shrew,He that knows better how to tame a shrew,TS IV.i.196
Now let him speake, 'tis charity to shew. Now let him speak – 'tis charity to show.TS IV.i.197
How fares my Kate, what sweeting all a-mort?How fares my Kate? What, sweeting, all amort?TS IV.iii.36
Plucke vp thy spirits, looke cheerfully vpon me.Pluck up thy spirits, look cheerfully upon me.TS IV.iii.38
Heere Loue, thou seest how diligent I am,Here love, thou seest how diligent I am,TS IV.iii.39
To dresse thy meate my selfe, and bring it thee.To dress thy meat myself, and bring it thee.TS IV.iii.40
I am sure sweet Kate, this kindnesse merites thankes.I am sure, sweet Kate, this kindness merits thanks.TS IV.iii.41
What, not a word? Nay then, thou lou'st it not:What, not a word? Nay, then, thou lov'st it not,TS IV.iii.42
And all my paines is sorted to no proofe.And all my pains is sorted to no proof.TS IV.iii.43
Heere take away this dish.Here, take away this dish.TS IV.iii.44.1
The poorest seruice is repaide with thankes,The poorest service is repaid with thanks,TS IV.iii.45
And so shall mine before you touch the meate.And so shall mine before you touch the meat.TS IV.iii.46
Eate it vp all Hortensio, if thou louest mee:Eat it up all, Hortensio, if thou lovest me.TS IV.iii.50
Much good do it vnto thy gentle heart:(to Katherina) Much good do it unto thy gentle heart!TS IV.iii.51
Kate eate apace; and now my honie Loue,Kate, eat apace. And now, my honey love,TS IV.iii.52
Will we returne vnto thy Fathers house,Will we return unto thy father's houseTS IV.iii.53
And reuell it as brauely as the best,And revel it as bravely as the best,TS IV.iii.54
With silken coats and caps, and golden Rings,With silken coats and caps, and golden rings,TS IV.iii.55
With Ruffes and Cuffes, and Fardingales, and things:With ruffs and cuffs and farthingales and things,TS IV.iii.56
With Scarfes, and Fannes, & double change of brau'ry,With scarfs and fans and double change of bravery,TS IV.iii.57
With Amber Bracelets, Beades, and all this knau'ry.With amber bracelets, beads, and all this knavery.TS IV.iii.58
What hast thou din'd? The Tailor staies thy leasure,What, hast thou dined? The tailor stays thy leisure,TS IV.iii.59
To decke thy bodie with his ruffling treasure.To deck thy body with his ruffling treasure.TS IV.iii.60
Come Tailor, let vs see these ornaments.Come, tailor, let us see these ornaments.TS IV.iii.61
Lay forth the gowne. Lay forth the gown.TS IV.iii.62.1
What newes with you sir?What news with you, sir?TS IV.iii.62.2
Why this was moulded on a porrenger,Why, this was moulded on a porringer – TS IV.iii.64
A Veluet dish: Fie, fie, 'tis lewd and filthy,A velvet dish. Fie, fie, 'tis lewd and filthy!TS IV.iii.65
Why 'tis a cockle or a walnut-shell,Why, 'tis a cockle or a walnut-shell,TS IV.iii.66
A knacke, a toy, a tricke, a babies cap:A knack, a toy, a trick, a baby's cap.TS IV.iii.67
Away with it, come let me haue a bigger.Away with it! Come, let me have a bigger.TS IV.iii.68
When you are gentle, you shall haue one too,When you are gentle, you shall have one too,TS IV.iii.71
And not till then.And not till then.TS IV.iii.72.1
Why thou saist true, it is paltrie cap,Why, thou say'st true – it is a paltry cap,TS IV.iii.81
A custard coffen, a bauble, a silken pie,A custard-coffin, a bauble, a silken pie.TS IV.iii.82
I loue thee well in that thou lik'st it not.I love thee well in that thou lik'st it not.TS IV.iii.83
Thy gowne, why I: come Tailor let vs see't.Thy gown? Why, ay. Come, tailor, let us see't.TS IV.iii.86
Oh mercie God, what masking stuffe is heere?O mercy, God! What masquing stuff is here?TS IV.iii.87
Whats this? a sleeue? 'tis like demi cannon,What's this? A sleeve? 'Tis like a demi-cannon.TS IV.iii.88
What, vp and downe caru'd like an apple Tart?What, up and down carved like an apple-tart?TS IV.iii.89
Heers snip, and nip, and cut, and slish and slash,Here's snip and nip and cut and slish and slash,TS IV.iii.90
Like to a Censor in a barbers shoppe:Like to a censer in a barber's shop.TS IV.iii.91
Why what a deuils name Tailor cal'st thou this?Why, what a devil's name, tailor, call'st thou this?TS IV.iii.92
Marrie and did: but if you be remembred,Marry, and did. But if you be remembered,TS IV.iii.96
I did not bid you marre it to the time.I did not bid you mar it to the time.TS IV.iii.97
Go hop me ouer euery kennell home,Go, hop me over every kennel home,TS IV.iii.98
For you shall hop without my custome sir:For you shall hop without my custom, sir.TS IV.iii.99
Ile none of it; hence, make your best of it.I'll none of it. Hence, make your best of it.TS IV.iii.100
Why true, he meanes to make a puppet of thee.Why, true, he means to make a puppet of thee.TS IV.iii.104
Oh monstrous arrogance: / Thou lyest, thou thred, thou thimble,O monstrous arrogance! Thou liest, thou thread, thou thimble,TS IV.iii.106
Thou yard three quarters, halfe yard, quarter, naile,Thou yard, three-quarters, half-yard, quarter, nail,TS IV.iii.107
Thou Flea, thou Nit, thou winter cricket thou:Thou flea, thou nit, thou winter-cricket thou!TS IV.iii.108
Brau'd in mine owne house with a skeine of thred:Braved in mine own house with a skein of thread?TS IV.iii.109
Away thou Ragge, thou quantitie, thou remnant,Away, thou rag, thou quantity, thou remnant,TS IV.iii.110
Or I shall so be-mete thee with thy yard,Or I shall so bemete thee with thy yardTS IV.iii.111
As thou shalt thinke on prating whil'st thou liu'st:As thou shalt think on prating whilst thou liv'st.TS IV.iii.112
I tell thee I, that thou hast marr'd her gowne.I tell thee, I, that thou hast marred her gown.TS IV.iii.113
Reade it.Read it.TS IV.iii.128
Proceede.Proceed.TS IV.iii.134
I there's the villanie.Ay, there's the villainy.TS IV.iii.140
Well sir in breefe the gowne is not for me.Well sir, in brief, the gown is not for me.TS IV.iii.151
Go take it vp vnto thy masters vse.Go, take it up unto thy master's use.TS IV.iii.153
Why sir, what's your conceit in that?Why sir, what's your conceit in that?TS IV.iii.156
Hortensio, say thou wilt see the Tailor paide:Hortensio, say thou wilt see the tailor paid.TS IV.iii.160
Go take it hence, be gone, and say no more.(to the Tailor) Go take it hence, be gone, and say no more.TS IV.iii.161
Well, come my Kate, we will vnto your fathers,Well, come my Kate, we will unto your father'sTS IV.iii.165
Euen in these honest meane habiliments:Even in these honest mean habiliments.TS IV.iii.166
Our purses shall be proud, our garments poore:Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,TS IV.iii.167
For 'tis the minde that makes the bodie rich.For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich,TS IV.iii.168
And as the Sunne breakes through the darkest clouds,And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds,TS IV.iii.169
So honor peereth in the meanest habit.So honour peereth in the meanest habit.TS IV.iii.170
What is the Iay more precious then the Larke?What, is the jay more precious than the larkTS IV.iii.171
Because his feathers are more beautifull.Because his fathers are more beautiful?TS IV.iii.172
Or is the Adder better then the Eele,Or is the adder better than the eelTS IV.iii.173
Because his painted skin contents the eye.Because his painted skin contents the eye?TS IV.iii.174
Oh no good Kate: neither art thou the worseO no, good Kate, neither art thou the worseTS IV.iii.175
For this poore furniture, and meane array.For this poor furniture and mean array.TS IV.iii.176
If thou accountedst it shame, lay it on me,If thou account'st it shame, lay it on me.TS IV.iii.177
And therefore frolicke, we will hence forthwith,And therefore frolic. We will hence forthwithTS IV.iii.178
To feast and sport vs at thy fathers house,To feast and sport us at thy father's house.TS IV.iii.179
Go call my men, and let vs straight to him, (to Grumio) Go call my men, and let us straight to him,TS IV.iii.180
And bring our horses vnto Long-lane end,And bring our horses unto Long-lane end,TS IV.iii.181
There wil we mount, and thither walke on foote,There will we mount, and thither walk on foot.TS IV.iii.182
Let's see, I thinke 'tis now some seuen a clocke,Let's see, I think 'tis now some seven o'clock,TS IV.iii.183
And well we may come there by dinner time.And well we may come there by dinner-time.TS IV.iii.184
It shall be seuen ere I go to horse:It shall be seven ere I go to horse.TS IV.iii.187
Looke what I speake, or do, or thinke to doe,Look what I speak, or do, or think to do,TS IV.iii.188
You are still crossing it, sirs let't alone,You are still crossing it. Sirs, let 't alone,TS IV.iii.189
I will not goe to day, and ere I doe,I will not go today, and ere I do,TS IV.iii.190
It shall be what a clock I say it is.It shall be what o'clock I say it is.TS IV.iii.191
Come on a Gods name, once more toward our fathers:Come on, a God's name, once more toward our father's.TS IV.v.1
Good Lord how bright and goodly shines the Moone.Good Lord, how bright and goodly shines the moon!TS IV.v.2
I say it is the Moone that shines so bright.I say it is the moon that shines so bright.TS IV.v.4
Now by my mothers sonne, and that's my selfe,Now by my mother's son, and that's myself,TS IV.v.6
It shall be moone, or starre, or what I list,It shall be moon, or star, or what I list,TS IV.v.7
Or ere I iourney to your Fathers house:Or e'er I journey to your father's house.TS IV.v.8
Goe on, and fetch our horses backe againe, (to the Servants) Go on and fetch our horses back again.TS IV.v.9
Euermore crost and crost, nothing but crost.Evermore crossed and crossed, nothing but crossed!TS IV.v.10
I say it is the Moone.I say it is the moon.TS IV.v.16.1
Nay then you lye: it is the blessed Sunne.Nay, then you lie. It is the blessed sun.TS IV.v.17
Well, forward, forward, thus the bowle should run,Well, forward, forward! Thus the bowl should run,TS IV.v.24
And not vnluckily against the Bias:And not unluckily against the bias.TS IV.v.25
But soft, Company is comming here.But, soft, company is coming here.TS IV.v.26
Good morrow gentle Mistris, where away:(to Vincentio) Good morrow, gentle mistress, where away?TS IV.v.27
Tell me sweete Kate, and tell me truely too,Tell me, sweet Kate, and tell me truly too,TS IV.v.28
Hast thou beheld a fresher Gentlewoman:Hast thou beheld a fresher gentlewoman?TS IV.v.29
Such warre of white and red within her cheekes:Such war of white and red within her cheeks!TS IV.v.30
What stars do spangle heauen with such beautie,What stars do spangle heaven with such beautyTS IV.v.31
As those two eyes become that heauenly face?As those two eyes become that heavenly face?TS IV.v.32
Faire louely Maide, once more good day to thee:Fair lovely maid, once more good day to thee.TS IV.v.33
Sweete Kate embrace her for her beauties sake.Sweet Kate, embrace her for her beauty's sake.TS IV.v.34
Why how now Kate, I hope thou art not mad,Why, how now, Kate, I hope thou art not mad!TS IV.v.42
This is a man old, wrinckled, faded, withered,This is a man, old, wrinkled, faded, withered,TS IV.v.43
And not a Maiden, as thou saist he is.And not a maiden, as thou say'st he is.TS IV.v.44
Do good old grandsire, & withall make knownDo, good old grandsire, and withal make knownTS IV.v.50
Which way thou trauellest, if along with vs,Which way thou travellest – if along with us,TS IV.v.51
We shall be ioyfull of thy companie.We shall be joyful of thy company.TS IV.v.52
What is his name?What is his name?TS IV.v.58.1
Happily met, the happier for thy sonne:Happily met – the happier for thy son.TS IV.v.59
And now by Law, as well as reuerent age,And now by law, as well as reverend age,TS IV.v.60
I may intitle thee my louing Father,I may entitle thee my loving father.TS IV.v.61
The sister to my wife, this Gentlewoman,The sister to my wife, this gentlewoman,TS IV.v.62
Thy Sonne by this hath married: wonder not,Thy son by this hath married. Wonder not,TS IV.v.63
Nor be not grieued, she is of good esteeme,Nor be not grieved – she is of good esteem,TS IV.v.64
Her dowrie wealthie, and of worthie birth;Her dowry wealthy, and of worthy birth,TS IV.v.65
Beside, so qualified, as may beseemeBeside, so qualified as may beseemTS IV.v.66
The Spouse of any noble Gentleman:The spouse of any noble gentleman.TS IV.v.67
Let me imbrace with old Vincentio,Let me embrace with old Vincentio,TS IV.v.68
And wander we to see thy honest sonne,And wander we to see thy honest son,TS IV.v.69
Who will of thy arriuall be full ioyous.Who will of thy arrival be full joyous.TS IV.v.70
Come goe along and see the truth hereof,Come, go along and see the truth hereof,TS IV.v.75
For our first merriment hath made thee iealous. For our first merriment hath made thee jealous.TS IV.v.76
Sir heres the doore, this is Lucentios house,Sir, here's the door, this is Lucentio's house.TS V.i.7
My Fathers beares more toward the Market-place,My father's bears more toward the market-place.TS V.i.8
Thither must I, and here I leaue you sir.Thither must I, and here I leave you, sir.TS V.i.9
Nay, I told you your sonne was well beloued Nay, I told you your son was well belovedTS V.i.22
in Padua: doe you heare sir, to leaue friuolous circumstances, in Padua. Do you hear, sir? To leave frivolous circumstances,TS V.i.23
I pray you tell signior Lucentio that his Father isI pray you tell Signor Lucentio that his father isTS V.i.24
come from Pisa, and is here at the doore to speake withcome from Pisa, and is here at the door to speak withTS V.i.25
him.him.TS V.i.26
Why how now gentleman: Why how now, gentleman!TS V.i.31
why this is flat knauerie to take vpon you another mans Why, this is flat knavery, to take upon you another man'sTS V.i.32
name.name.TS V.i.33
Pree the Kate let's stand aside and see the Prithee, Kate, let's stand aside and see theTS V.i.54
end of this controuersie.end of this controversy.TS V.i.55
First kisse me Kate, and we will.First kiss me, Kate, and we will.TS V.i.132
What art thou asham'd of me?What, art thou ashamed of me?TS V.i.134
Why then let's home againe: Why, then, let's home again.TS V.i.136
Come Sirra let's awaie.(to Grumio) Come, sirrah, let's away.TS V.i.137
Is not this well? come my sweete Kate.Is not this well? Come, my sweet Kate.TS V.i.140
Better once then neuer, for neuer to late. Better once than never, for never too late.TS V.i.141
Nothing but sit and sit, and eate and eate.Nothing but sit and sit, and eat and eat!TS V.ii.12
Padua affords nothing but what is kinde.Padua affords nothing but what is kind.TS V.ii.14
Now for my life Hortentio feares his Widow.Now, for my life, Hortensio fears his widow.TS V.ii.16
You are verie sencible, and yet you misse my sence:You are very sensible, and yet you miss my sense:TS V.ii.18
I meane Hortentio is afeard of you.I mean Hortensio is afeard of you.TS V.ii.19
Roundlie replied.Roundly replied.TS V.ii.21.1
Conceiues by me, how likes Hortentio that?Conceives by me! How likes Hortensio that?TS V.ii.23
Verie well mended: kisse him for that good Widdow.Very well mended. Kiss him for that, good widow.TS V.ii.25
To her Kate.To her, Kate!TS V.ii.33
A hundred marks, my Kate does put her down.A hundred marks, my Kate does put her down.TS V.ii.35
Spoke like an Officer: ha to the lad.Spoke like an officer – ha' to thee, lad.TS V.ii.37
Nay that you shall not since you haue begun:Nay, that you shall not. Since you have begun,TS V.ii.44
Haue at you for a better iest or too.Have at you for a bitter jest or two.TS V.ii.45
She hath preuented me, here signior Tranio,She hath prevented me. Here, Signor Tranio,TS V.ii.49
This bird you aim'd at, though you hit her not,This bird you aimed at, though you hit her not – TS V.ii.50
Therefore a health to all that shot and mist.Therefore a health to all that shot and missed.TS V.ii.51
A good swift simile, but something currish.A good swift simile, but something currish.TS V.ii.54
A has a little gald me I confesse:'A has a little galled me, I confess;TS V.ii.60
And as the Iest did glaunce awaie from me,And as the jest did glance away from me,TS V.ii.61
'Tis ten to one it maim'd you too out right.'Tis ten to one it maimed you two outright.TS V.ii.62
Well, I say no: and therefore sir assurance,Well, I say no. And therefore for assuranceTS V.ii.65
Let's each one send vnto his wife,Let's each one send unto his wife,TS V.ii.66
And he whose wife is most obedient,And he whose wife is most obedient,TS V.ii.67
To come at first when he doth send for her,To come at first when he doth send for her,TS V.ii.68
Shall win the wager which we will propose.Shall win the wager which we will propose.TS V.ii.69
Twentie crownes,Twenty crowns?TS V.ii.71
Ile venture so much of my Hawke or Hound,I'll venture so much of my hawk or hound,TS V.ii.72
But twentie times so much vpon my Wife.But twenty times so much upon my wife.TS V.ii.73
A match, 'tis done.A match! 'Tis done.TS V.ii.74.3
How? she's busie, and she cannot come: How? She's busy, and she cannot come!TS V.ii.81
is that an answere?Is that an answer?TS V.ii.82.1
I hope better.I hope better.TS V.ii.84
Oh ho, intreate her, O ho, entreat her!TS V.ii.86.2
nay then shee must needes come.Nay, then she must needs come.TS V.ii.87.1
Worse and worse, she will not come: / Oh vilde, Worse and worse, she will not come! O vile,TS V.ii.92
intollerable, not to be indur'd:Intolerable, not to be endured!TS V.ii.93
Sirra Grumio, goe to your Mistris,Sirrah Grumio, go to your mistress,TS V.ii.94
Say I command her come to me. Say I command her come to me.TS V.ii.95
What?What?TS V.ii.96.2
The fouler fortune mine, and there an end.The fouler fortune mine, and there an end.TS V.ii.97
Where is your sister, and Hortensios wife?Where is your sister, and Hortensio's wife?TS V.ii.100
Goe fetch them hither, if they denie to come,Go fetch them hither. If they deny to come,TS V.ii.102
Swinge me them soundly forth vnto their husbands:Swinge me them soundly forth unto their husbands.TS V.ii.103
Away I say, and bring them hither straight.Away, I say, and bring them hither straight.TS V.ii.104
Marrie peace it boads, and loue, and quiet life,Marry, peace it bodes, and love, and quiet life,TS V.ii.107
An awfull rule, and right supremicie:And awful rule, and right supremacy,TS V.ii.108
And to be short, what not, that's sweete and happie.And, to be short, what not that's sweet and happy.TS V.ii.109
Nay, I will win my wager better yet,Nay, I will win my wager better yet,TS V.ii.115
And show more signe of her obedience,And show more sign of her obedience,TS V.ii.116
Her new built vertue and obedience.Her new-built virtue and obedience.TS V.ii.117
See where she comes, and brings your froward WiuesSee where she comes, and brings your froward wivesTS V.ii.118
As prisoners to her womanlie perswasion:As prisoners to her womanly persuasion.TS V.ii.119
Katerine, that Cap of yours becomes you not,Katherine, that cap of yours becomes you not.TS V.ii.120
Off with that bable, throw it vnderfoote.Off with that bauble, throw it under foot.TS V.ii.121
Katherine I charge thee tell these head-strong women, Katherine, I charge thee, tell these headstrong womenTS V.ii.129
what dutie they doe owe their Lords and husbands.What duty they do owe their lords and husbands.TS V.ii.130
Come on I say, and first begin with her.Come on, I say, and first begin with her.TS V.ii.132
I say she shall, and first begin with her.I say she shall. And first begin with her.TS V.ii.134
Why there's a wench: Come on, and kisse mee Kate.Why, there's a wench! Come on, and kiss me, Kate.TS V.ii.179
Come Kate, weee'le to bed,Come, Kate, we'll to bed.TS V.ii.183
We three are married, but you two are sped.We three are married, but you two are sped.TS V.ii.184
'Twas I wonne the wager, though you hit the white,(to Lucentio) 'Twas I won the wager, though you hit the white,TS V.ii.185
And being a winner, God giue you good night.And being a winner, God give you good night!TS V.ii.186
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL