PEDANT
Show:
Original textModern textKey line
God saue you sir.God save you, sir.TS IV.ii.72.1
Sir at the farthest for a weeke or two,Sir, at the farthest for a week or two,TS IV.ii.74
But then vp farther, and as farre as Rome,But then up farther, and as far as Rome,TS IV.ii.75
And so to Tripolie, if God lend me life.And so to Tripoli, if God lend me life.TS IV.ii.76
Of Mantua.Of Mantua.TS IV.ii.77.2
My life sir? how I pray? for that goes hard.My life, sir? How, I pray? For that goes hard.TS IV.ii.80
Alas sir, it is worse for me then so,Alas, sir, it is worse for me than so!TS IV.ii.88
For I haue bils for monie by exchangeFor I have bills for money by exchangeTS IV.ii.89
From Florence, and must heere deliuer them.From Florence, and must here deliver them.TS IV.ii.90
I sir, in Pisa haue I often bin,Ay, sir, in Pisa have I often been,TS IV.ii.94
Pisa renowned for graue Citizens.Pisa renowned for grave citizens.TS IV.ii.95
I know him not, but I haue heard of him:I know him not, but I have heard of him,TS IV.ii.97
A Merchant of incomparable wealth.A merchant of incomparable wealth.TS IV.ii.98
Oh sir I do, and wil repute you euerO, sir, I do, and will repute you everTS IV.ii.113
The patron of my life and libertie.The patron of my life and liberty.TS IV.ii.114
I what else, and but I be deceiued,Ay, what else? And but I be deceivedTS IV.iv.2
Signior Baptista may remember meSignor Baptista may remember meTS IV.iv.3
Neere twentie yeares a goe in Genoa.Near twenty years ago in Genoa,TS IV.iv.4
Where we were lodgers, at the Pegasus,Where we were lodgers at the Pegasus.TS IV.iv.5
I warrant you: but sir here comes your boy,I warrant you. But sir, here comes your boy.TS IV.iv.8
'Twere good he were school'd.'Twere good he were schooled.TS IV.iv.9
Soft son:Soft, son!TS IV.iv.23
sir by your leaue, hauing com to PaduaSir, by your leave, having come to PaduaTS IV.iv.24
To gather in some debts, my son LucentioTo gather in some debts, my son LucentioTS IV.iv.25
Made me acquainted with a waighty causeMade me acquainted with a weighty causeTS IV.iv.26
Of loue betweene your daughter and himselfe:Of love between your daughter and himself.TS IV.iv.27
And for the good report I heare of you,And – for the good report I hear of you,TS IV.iv.28
And for the loue he beareth to your daughter,And for the love he beareth to your daughter,TS IV.iv.29
And she to him: to stay him not too long,And she to him – to stay him not too long,TS IV.iv.30
I am content in a good fathers careI am content, in a good father's care,TS IV.iv.31
To haue him matcht, and if you please to likeTo have him matched; and, if you please to likeTS IV.iv.32
No worse then I, vpon some agreementNo worse than I, upon some agreementTS IV.iv.33
Me shall you finde readie and willingMe shall you find ready and willingTS IV.iv.34
With one consent to haue her so bestowed:With one consent to have her so bestowed.TS IV.iv.35
For curious I cannot be with youFor curious I cannot be with you,TS IV.iv.36
Signior Baptista, of whom I heare so well.Signor Baptista, of whom I hear so well.TS IV.iv.37
What's he that knockes as he would beat downe the What's he that knocks as he would beat down theTS V.i.14
gate?gate?TS V.i.15
He's within sir, but not to be spoken withall.He's within, sir, but not to be spoken withal.TS V.i.17
Keepe your hundred pounds to your selfe, hee shall Keep your hundred pounds to yourself. He shallTS V.i.20
neede none so long as I liue.need none so long as I live.TS V.i.21
Thou liest his Father is come from Padua, andThou liest. His father is come from Mantua, andTS V.i.27
here looking out at the window.here looking out at the window.TS V.i.28
I sir, so his mother saies, if I may beleeue her.Ay sir, so his mother says, if I may believe her.TS V.i.30
Lay hands on the villaine, I beleeue a meanes to Lay hands on the villain. I believe a' means toTS V.i.34
cosen some bodie in this Citie vnder my countenance.cozen somebody in this city under my countenance.TS V.i.35
Helpe, sonne, helpe signior Baptista.Help, son! Help, Signor Baptista!TS V.i.53
Awaie, awaie mad asse, his name is Lucentio, andAway, away, mad ass! His name is Lucentio, andTS V.i.75
he is mine onelie sonne and heire to the Lands of me signior he is mine only son, and heir to the lands of me, SignorTS V.i.76
Vincentio.Vincentio.TS V.i.77
Sweare if thou dar'st.Swear if thou dar'st.TS V.i.92
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL