GRUMIO
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Knocke sir? whom should I knocke? Is there any Knock, sir? Whom should I knock? Is there anyTS I.ii.6
man ha's rebus'd your worship?man has rebused your worship?TS I.ii.7
Knocke you heere sir? Why sir, what am I sir,Knock you here, sir? Why, sir, what am I, sir,TS I.ii.9
that I should knocke you heere sir.that I should knock you here, sir?TS I.ii.10
My Mr is growne quarrelsome: / I should knocke you first,My master is grown quarrelsome. I should knock you first,TS I.ii.13
And then I know after who comes by the worst.And then I know after who comes by the worst.TS I.ii.14
Helpe mistris helpe, my master is mad.Help, masters, help! My master is mad.TS I.ii.18
Nay 'tis no matter sir, what he leges in Latine. If Nay, 'tis no matter, sir, what he 'leges in Latin. IfTS I.ii.28
this be not a lawfull cause for me to leaue his seruice,this be not a lawful cause for me to leave his service,TS I.ii.29
looke you sir: He bid me knocke him, & rap him look you, sir. He bid me knock him and rap himTS I.ii.30
soundly sir. Well, was it fit for a seruant to vse his soundly, sir. Well, was it fit for a servant to use hisTS I.ii.31
master so, being perhaps (for ought I see) two and thirty, master so, being perhaps, for aught I see, two and thirty,TS I.ii.32
a peepe out? a pip out?TS I.ii.33
Whom would to God I had well knockt at first,Whom would to God I had well knocked at first,TS I.ii.34
then had not Grumio come by the worst.Then had not Grumio come by the worst.TS I.ii.35
Knocke at the gate? O heauens: spake you notKnock at the gate? O heavens! Spake you notTS I.ii.39
these words plaine? Sirra, Knocke me heere: rappe me heere: these words plain, ‘ Sirrah, knock me here, rap me here,TS I.ii.40
knocke me well, and knocke me soundly? And come you knock me well, and knock me soundly ’? And come youTS I.ii.41
now with knocking at the gate?now with ‘ knocking at the gate ’?TS I.ii.42
Nay looke you sir, hee tels you flatly what hisNay, look you, sir, he tells you flatly what hisTS I.ii.76
minde is: why giue him Gold enough, and marrie him to mind is. Why, give him gold enough and marry him toTS I.ii.77
a Puppet or an Aglet babie, or an old trot with ne're aa puppet or an aglet-baby, or an old trot with ne'er aTS I.ii.78
tooth in her head, though she haue as manie diseases tooth in her head, though she have as many diseasesTS I.ii.79
as two and fiftie horses. Why nothing comes amisse, soas two and fifty horses. Why, nothing comes amiss, soTS I.ii.80
monie comes withall.money comes withal.TS I.ii.81
I pray you Sir let him go while the humor lasts.I pray you, sir, let him go while the humour lasts.TS I.ii.106
A my word, and she knew him as wel as I do, she wouldO' my word, an she knew him as well as I do, she wouldTS I.ii.107
thinke scolding would doe little good vpon him. Shee may think scolding would do little good upon him. She mayTS I.ii.108
perhaps call him halfe a score Knaues, or so: Why that's perhaps call him half a score knaves or so. Why, that'sTS I.ii.109
nothing; and he begin once, hee'l raile in his rope trickes. nothing; an he begin once, he'll rail in his rope-tricks.TS I.ii.110
Ile tell you what sir, and she stand him but a litle, he I'll tell you what, sir, an she stand him but a little, heTS I.ii.111
wil throw a figure in her face, and so disfigure hir with will throw a figure in her face, and so disfigure her withTS I.ii.112
it, that shee shal haue no more eies to see withall then a it that she shall have no more eyes to see withal than aTS I.ii.113
Cat: you know him not sir.cat. You know him not, sir.TS I.ii.114
Katherine the curst,Katherine the curst,TS I.ii.127
A title for a maide, of all titles the worst.A title for a maid of all titles the worst.TS I.ii.128
Heere's no knauerie. See, to beguile the olde-folkes, Here's no knavery! See, to beguile the old folks,TS I.ii.136
how the young folkes lay their heads together.how the young folks lay their heads together.TS I.ii.137
Master, master, looke about you: Who goes there? ha.Master, master, look about you. Who goes there, ha?TS I.ii.138
A proper stripling, and an amorous.A proper stripling and an amorous!TS I.ii.141
Oh this Woodcocke, what an Asse it is.O this woodcock, what an ass it is!TS I.ii.158
And that his bags shal proue.And that his bags shall prove.TS I.ii.175
Wil he woo her? I: or Ile hang her.Will he woo her? Ay, or I'll hang her.TS I.ii.195
For he feares none.For he fears none.TS I.ii.208.2
I would I were as sure of a good dinner.I would I were as sure of a good dinner.TS I.ii.215
Gru.Bion.GRUMIO and BIONDELLO
Oh excellent motion: fellowes let's be gon.O excellent motion! Fellows, let's be gone.TS I.ii.277
I sir, they be ready, the Oates haue eaten theAy, sir, they be ready – the oats have eaten theTS III.ii.204
horses.horses.TS III.ii.205
Fie, fie on all tired Iades, on all mad Masters, &Fie, fie on all tired jades, on all mad masters, andTS IV.i.1
all foule waies: was euer man so beaten? was euer man so all foul ways! Was ever man so beaten? Was ever man soTS IV.i.2
raide? was euer man so weary? I am sent before to make rayed? Was ever man so weary? I am sent before to makeTS IV.i.3
a fire, and they are comming after to warme them: now a fire, and they are coming after to warm them. NowTS IV.i.4
were not I a little pot, & soone hot; my very lippes might were not I a little pot and soon hot, my very lips mightTS IV.i.5
freeze to my teeth, my tongue to the roofe of my mouth, myfreeze to my teeth, my tongue to the roof of my mouth, myTS IV.i.6
heart in my belly, ere l should come by a fire to thaw me, heart in my belly, ere I should come by a fire to thaw me.TS IV.i.7
but I with blowing the fire shall warme my selfe: for considering But I with blowing the fire shall warm myself, for, consideringTS IV.i.8
the weather, a taller man then I will take cold: the weather, a taller man than I will take cold.TS IV.i.9
Holla, hoa Curtis.Holla, ho! Curtis.TS IV.i.10
A piece of Ice: if thou doubt it, thou maist slide A piece of ice. If thou doubt it, thou mayst slideTS IV.i.12
from my shoulder to my heele, with no greater a run but from my shoulder to my heel with no greater a run butTS IV.i.13
my head and my necke. A fire good Curtis.my head and my neck. A fire, good Curtis.TS IV.i.14
Oh I Curtis I, and therefore fire, fire, cast on O ay, Curtis, ay – and therefore fire, fire, cast onTS IV.i.16
no water.no water.TS IV.i.17
She was good Curtis before this frost: but thouShe was, good Curtis, before this frost. But thouTS IV.i.19
know'st winter tames man, woman, and beast: for itknow'st winter tames man, woman, and beast; for itTS IV.i.20
hath tam'd my old master, and my new mistris, and hath tamed my old master, and my new mistress, andTS IV.i.21
my selfe fellow Curtis.myself, fellow Curtis.TS IV.i.22
Am I but three inches? Why thy horne is a footAm I but three inches? Why, thy horn is a foot,TS IV.i.24
and so long am I at the least. But wilt thou make a fire,and so long am I at the least. But wilt thou make a fire,TS IV.i.25
or shall I complaine on thee to our mistris, whose handor shall I complain on thee to our mistress, whose handTS IV.i.26
(she being now at hand) thou shalt soone feele, to thy – she being now at hand – thou shalt soon feel, to thyTS IV.i.27
cold comfort, for being slow in thy hot office.cold comfort, for being slow in thy hot office?TS IV.i.28
A cold world Curtis in euery office but thine, A cold world, Curtis, in every office but thine – TS IV.i.31
& therefore fire: do thy duty, and haue thy dutie, for and therefore fire. Do thy duty, and have thy duty, forTS IV.i.32
my Master and mistris are almost frozen to death.my master and mistress are almost frozen to death.TS IV.i.33
Why Iacke boy, ho boy, and as much newes asWhy, ‘ Jack, boy, ho boy!’ and as much news asTS IV.i.36
wilt thou.wilt thou.TS IV.i.37
Why therefore fire, for I haue caught extremeWhy therefore fire, for I have caught extremeTS IV.i.39
cold. Where's the Cooke, is supper ready, the housecold. Where's the cook? Is supper ready, the houseTS IV.i.40
trim'd, rushes strew'd, cobwebs swept, the seruingmentrimmed, rushes strewed, cobwebs swept, the serving-menTS IV.i.41
in their new fustian, the white stockings, and in their new fustian, their white stockings, andTS IV.i.42
euery officer his wedding garment on? Be the Iackes every officer his wedding-garment on? Be the JacksTS IV.i.43
faire within, the Gils faire without, the Carpets laide, and fair within, the Jills fair without, the carpets laid, andTS IV.i.44
euerie thing in order?everything in order?TS IV.i.45
First know my horse is tired, my master & First know my horse is tired, my master andTS IV.i.47
mistris falne out. mistress fallen out.TS IV.i.48
Out of their saddles into the durt, and therebyOut of their saddles into the dirt, and therebyTS IV.i.50
hangs a tale.hangs a tale.TS IV.i.51
Lend thine eare.Lend thine ear.TS IV.i.53
There.There.TS IV.i.55
And therefore 'tis cal'd a sensible tale: and thisAnd therefore 'tis called a sensible tale; and thisTS IV.i.57
Cuffe was but to knocke at your eare, and beseech listning: cuff was but to knock at your ear and beseech listening.TS IV.i.58
now I begin, Inprimis wee came downe a fowle hill, my Now I begin. Imprimis, we came down a foul hill, myTS IV.i.59
Master riding behinde my Mistris.master riding behind my mistress – TS IV.i.60
What's that to thee?What's that to thee?TS IV.i.62
Tell thou the tale: but hadst thou not crost Tell thou the tale. But hadst thou not crossedTS IV.i.64
me, thou shouldst haue heard how her horse fel, and me, thou shouldst have heard how her horse fell, andTS IV.i.65
she vnder her horse: thou shouldst haue heard in how she under her horse; thou shouldst have heard in howTS IV.i.66
miery a place, how she was bemoil'd, how hee left her miry a place, how she was bemoiled, how he left herTS IV.i.67
with the horse vpon her, how he beat me because her with the horse upon her, how he beat me because herTS IV.i.68
horse stumbled, how she waded through the durt to horse stumbled, how she waded through the dirt toTS IV.i.69
plucke him off me: how he swore, how she prai'd, that pluck him off me, how he swore, how she prayed thatTS IV.i.70
neuer prai'd before: how I cried, how the horses ranne never prayed before, how I cried, how the horses ranTS IV.i.71
away, how her bridle was burst: how I lost my crupper, away, how her bridle was burst, how I lost my crupperTS IV.i.72
with manie things of worthy memorie, which now shall – with many things of worthy memory, which now shallTS IV.i.73
die in obliuion, and thou returne vnexperienc'd to thy die in oblivion, and thou return unexperienced to thyTS IV.i.74
graue.grave.TS IV.i.75
I, and that thou and the proudest of you all Ay, and that thou and the proudest of you allTS IV.i.77
shall finde when he comes home. But what talke I of this?shall find when he comes home. But what talk I of this?TS IV.i.78
Call forth Nathaniel, Ioseph, Nicholas, Phillip, Walter,Call forth Nathaniel, Joseph, Nicholas, Philip, Walter,TS IV.i.79
Sugersop and the rest: let their heads bee slickely Sugarsop, and the rest. Let their heads be slicklyTS IV.i.80
comb'd, their blew coats brush'd, and their garters combed, their blue coats brushed, and their gartersTS IV.i.81
of an indifferent knit, let them curtsie with their left of an indifferent knit. Let them curtsy with their leftTS IV.i.82
legges, and not presume to touch a haire of my Masters legs, and not presume to touch a hair of my master'sTS IV.i.83
horse-taile, till they kisse their hands. Are they all readie?horse-tail till they kiss their hands. Are they all ready?TS IV.i.84
Call them forth.Call them forth.TS IV.i.86
Why she hath a face of her owne.Why, she hath a face of her own.TS IV.i.89
Thou it seemes, that cals for company to countenance Thou, it seems, that calls for company to countenanceTS IV.i.91
her.her.TS IV.i.92
Why she comes to borrow nothing of them.Why, she comes to borrow nothing of them.TS IV.i.94
Welcome you: how now you: what you: Welcome, you. How now, you. What, you.TS IV.i.100
fellow you: and thus much for greeting. Now my spruceFellow, you. And thus much for greeting. Now, my spruceTS IV.i.101
companions, is all readie, and all things neate?companions, is all ready, and all things neat?TS IV.i.102
E'ne at hand, alighted by this: and therefore beE'en at hand, alighted by this. And therefore beTS IV.i.104
not--- Cockes passion, silence, I heare my master.not – Cock's passion, silence! I hear my master.TS IV.i.105
Heere sir, as foolish as I was before.Here, sir, as foolish as I was before.TS IV.i.114
Nathaniels coate sir was not fully made,Nathaniel's coat, sir, was not fully made,TS IV.i.118
And Gabrels pumpes were all vnpinkt i'th heele:And Gabriel's pumps were all unpinked i'th' heel.TS IV.i.119
There was no Linke to colour Peters hat,There was no link to colour Peter's hat,TS IV.i.120
And Walters dagger was not come from sheathing:And Walter's dagger was not come from sheathing.TS IV.i.121
There were none fine, but Adam, Rafe, and Gregory,There were none fine but Adam, Rafe, and Gregory – TS IV.i.122
The rest were ragged, old, and beggerly,The rest were ragged, old, and beggarly.TS IV.i.123
Yet as they are, heere are they come to meete you.Yet, as they are, here are they come to meet you.TS IV.i.124
Where is he?Where is he?TS IV.i.167
No, no forsooth I dare not for my life.No, no, forsooth, I dare not for my life.TS IV.iii.1
What say you to a Neats foote?What say you to a neat's foot?TS IV.iii.17
I feare it is too chollericke a meate.I fear it is too choleric a meat.TS IV.iii.19
How say you to a fat Tripe finely broyl'd?How say you to a fat tripe finely broiled?TS IV.iii.20
I cannot tell, I feare 'tis chollericke.I cannot tell, I fear 'tis choleric.TS IV.iii.22
What say you to a peece of Beefe and Mustard?What say you to a piece of beef and mustard?TS IV.iii.23
I, but the Mustard is too hot a little.Ay, but the mustard is too hot a little.TS IV.iii.25
Nay then I wil not, you shal haue the MustardNay then, I will not. You shall have the mustard,TS IV.iii.27
Or else you get no beefe of Grumio.Or else you get no beef of Grumio.TS IV.iii.28
Why then the Mustard without the beefe.Why then, the mustard without the beef.TS IV.iii.30
I gaue him no order, I gaue him the stuffe.I gave him no order, I gave him the stuff.TS IV.iii.117
Marrie sir with needle and thred.Marry, sir, with needle and thread.TS IV.iii.119
Thou hast fac'd many things.Thou hast faced many things.TS IV.iii.121
Face not mee: thou hast brau'd manie men, braue Face not me. Thou hast braved many men; braveTS IV.iii.123
not me; I will neither bee fac'd nor brau'd. I say vnto not me. I will neither be faced nor braved. I say untoTS IV.iii.124
thee, I bid thy Master cut out the gowne, but I did not thee, I bid thy master cut out the gown, but I did notTS IV.iii.125
bid him cut it to peeces. Ergo thou liest.bid him cut it to pieces. Ergo, thou liest.TS IV.iii.126
The note lies in's throate if he say I said so.The note lies in's throat, if he say I said so.TS IV.iii.129
Master, if euer I said loose-bodied gowne, sow me Master, if ever I said loose-bodied gown, sew meTS IV.iii.131
in the skirts of it, and beate me to death with a bottome of in the skirts of it and beat me to death with a bottom ofTS IV.iii.132
browne thred: I said a gowne.brown thread. I said a gown.TS IV.iii.133
I confesse the cape.I confess the cape.TS IV.iii.136
I confesse two sleeues.I confess two sleeves.TS IV.iii.138
Error i'th bill sir, error i'th bill? I commandedError i'th' bill, sir, error i'th' bill! I commandedTS IV.iii.141
the sleeues should be cut out, and sow'd vp againe, andthe sleeves should be cut out, and sewed up again; andTS IV.iii.142
that Ile proue vpon thee, though thy little finger be that I'll prove upon thee, though thy little finger beTS IV.iii.143
armed in a thimble.armed in a thimble.TS IV.iii.144
I am for thee straight: take thou the bill, giueI am for thee straight. Take thou the bill, giveTS IV.iii.147
me thy meat-yard, and spare not me.me thy mete-yard, and spare not me.TS IV.iii.148
You are i'th right sir, 'tis for my mistris.You are i'th' right, sir, 'tis for my mistress.TS IV.iii.152
Villaine, not for thy life: Take vp my MistresseVillain, not for thy life! Take up my mistress'TS IV.iii.154
gowne for thy masters vse.gown for thy master's use!TS IV.iii.155
Oh sir, the conceit is deeper then you think for:O sir, the conceit is deeper than you think for.TS IV.iii.157
Take vp my Mistris gowne to his masters vse.Take up my mistress' gown to his master's use!TS IV.iii.158
Oh fie, fie, fie.O fie, fie, fie!TS IV.iii.159
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