THURIO
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Seeme you that you are not? Seem you that you are not?TG II.iv.10
So doe Counterfeyts. So do counterfeits.TG II.iv.12
What seeme I that I am not? What seem I that I am not?TG II.iv.14
What instance of the contrary? What instance of the contrary?TG II.iv.16
And how quoat you my folly? And how quote you my folly?TG II.iv.18
My Ierkin is a doublet. My jerkin is a doublet.TG II.iv.20
How? How?TG II.iv.22
That hath more minde to feed on your bloud, then That hath more mind to feed on your blood thanTG II.iv.26
liue in your ayre. live in your air.TG II.iv.27
I Sir, and done too for this time. Ay, sir, and done too, for this time.TG II.iv.29
Sir, if you spend word for word with me, I shall Sir, if you spend word for word with me, I shallTG II.iv.39
make your wit bankrupt. make your wit bankrupt.TG II.iv.40
They say that Loue hath not an eye at all. They say that Love hath not an eye at all.TG II.iv.94
Since his exile she hath despis'd me most,Since his exile she hath despised me most,TG III.ii.3
Forsworne my company, and rail'd at me,Forsworn my company, and railed at me,TG III.ii.4
That I am desperate of obtaining her.That I am desperate of obtaining her.TG III.ii.5
Therefore, as you vnwinde her loue from him;Therefore, as you unwind her love from him,TG III.ii.51
Least it should rauell, and be good to none,Lest it should ravel, and be good to none,TG III.ii.52
You must prouide to bottome it on me:You must provide to bottom it on me;TG III.ii.53
Which must be done, by praising me as muchWhich must be done by praising me as muchTG III.ii.54
As you, in worth dispraise, sir Valentine.As you in worth dispraise Sir Valentine.TG III.ii.55
And thy aduice, this night, ile put in practise:And thy advice this night I'll put in practice;TG III.ii.89
Therefore, sweet Protheus, my direction-giuer,Therefore, sweet Proteus, my direction-giver,TG III.ii.90
Let vs into the City presentlyLet us into the city presentlyTG III.ii.91
To sort some Gentlemen, well skil'd in Musicke.To sort some gentlemen well skilled in music.TG III.ii.92
I haue a Sonnet, that will serue the turneI have a sonnet that will serve the turnTG III.ii.93
To giue the on-set to thy good aduise.To give the onset to thy good advice.TG III.ii.94
How now, sir Protheus, are you crept before vs?How now, Sir Proteus, are you crept before us?TG IV.ii.18
I, but I hope, Sir, that you loue not here.Ay, but I hope, sir, that you love not here.TG IV.ii.21
Who, Siluia?Who? Silvia?TG IV.ii.23.1
I thanke you for your owne: Now GentlemenI thank you for your own. Now, gentlemen,TG IV.ii.24
Let's tune: and too it lustily a while.Let's tune, and to it lustily awhile.TG IV.ii.25
Where meete we?Where meet we?TG IV.ii.81.1
Farewell.Farewell.TG IV.ii.81.3
Sir Protheus, what saies Siluia to my suit?Sir Proteus, what says Silvia to my suit?TG V.ii.1
What? that my leg is too long?What? That my leg is too long?TG V.ii.4
Ile weare a Boote, to make it somewhat rounder.I'll wear a boot to make it somewhat rounder.TG V.ii.6
What saies she to my face?What says she to my face?TG V.ii.8
Nay then the wanton lyes: my face is blacke.Nay then, the wanton lies; my face is black.TG V.ii.10
How likes she my discourse?How likes she my discourse?TG V.ii.15
But well, when I discourse of loue and peace.But well when I discourse of love and peace?TG V.ii.17
What sayes she to my valour?What says she to my valour?TG V.ii.19
What saies she to my birth?What says she to my birth?TG V.ii.22
Considers she my Possessions?Considers she my possessions?TG V.ii.25
Wherefore?Wherefore?TG V.ii.27
Not I.Not I.TG V.ii.33.1
Why this it is, to be a peeuish Girle,Why, this it is to be a peevish girlTG V.ii.49
That flies her fortune when it followes her:That flies her fortune when it follows her.TG V.ii.50
Ile after; more to be reueng'd on Eglamoure,I'll after, more to be revenged on EglamourTG V.ii.51
Then for the loue of reck-lesse Siluia.Than for the love of reckless Silvia.TG V.ii.52
Yonder is Siluia: and Siluia's mine.Yonder is Silvia; and Silvia's mine.TG V.iv.126
Sir Valentine, I care not for her, I:Sir Valentine, I care not for her, I:TG V.iv.133
I hold him but a foole that will endangerI hold him but a fool that will endangerTG V.iv.134
His Body, for a Girle that loues him not:His body for a girl that loves him not.TG V.iv.135
I claime her not, and therefore she is thine.I claim her not and therefore she is thine.TG V.iv.136
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