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Now, daughter Siluia, you are hard beset. Now, daughter Silvia, you are hard beset.TG II.iv.47
Sir Valentine, your father is in good health, Sir Valentine, your father is in good health.TG II.iv.48
What say you to a Letter from your friends What say you to a letter from your friendsTG II.iv.49
Of much good newes? Of much good news?TG II.iv.50.1
Know ye Don Antonio, your Countriman? Know ye Don Antonio, your countryman?TG II.iv.52
Hath he not a Sonne? Hath he not a son?TG II.iv.56
You know him well? You know him well?TG II.iv.59
Beshrew me sir, but if he make this good Beshrew me, sir, but if he make this good,TG II.iv.73
He is as worthy for an Empresse loue, He is as worthy for an empress' loveTG II.iv.74
As meet to be an Emperors Councellor: As meet to be an emperor's counsellor.TG II.iv.75
Well, Sir: this Gentleman is come to me Well, sir, this gentleman is come to meTG II.iv.76
With Commendation from great Potentates, With commendation from great potentates,TG II.iv.77
And heere he meanes to spend his time a while, And here he means to spend his time awhile.TG II.iv.78
I thinke 'tis no vn-welcome newes to you. I think 'tis no unwelcome news to you.TG II.iv.79
Welcome him then according to his worth: Welcome him then according to his worth.TG II.iv.81
Siluia, I speake to you, and you Sir Thurio, Silvia, I speak to you, and you, Sir Thurio;TG II.iv.82
For Valentine, I need not cite him to it, For Valentine, I need not cite him to it.TG II.iv.83
I will send him hither to you presently. I will send him hither to you presently.TG II.iv.84
Sir Thurio, giue vs leaue (I pray) a while, Sir Thurio, give us leave, I pray, awhile;TG III.i.1
We haue some secrets to confer about. We have some secrets to confer about.TG III.i.2
Now tell me Protheus, what's your will with me? Now, tell me, Proteus, what's your will with me?TG III.i.3
Protheus, I thank thee for thine honest care, Proteus, I thank thee for thine honest care,TG III.i.22
Which to requite, command me while I liue. Which to requite, command me while I live.TG III.i.23
This loue of theirs, my selfe haue often seene, This love of theirs myself have often seen,TG III.i.24
Haply when they haue iudg'd me fast asleepe, Haply when they have judged me fast asleep,TG III.i.25
And oftentimes haue purpos'd to forbid And oftentimes have purposed to forbidTG III.i.26
Sir Valentine her companie, and my Court. Sir Valentine her company and my court;TG III.i.27
But fearing lest my iealous ayme might erre, But, fearing lest my jealous aim might err,TG III.i.28
And so (vnworthily) disgrace the man And so, unworthily, disgrace the man – TG III.i.29
(A rashnesse that I euer yet haue shun'd) A rashness that I ever yet have shunned – TG III.i.30
I gaue him gentle lookes, thereby to finde I gave him gentle looks, thereby to findTG III.i.31
That which thy selfe hast now disclos'd to me. That which thyself hast now disclosed to me.TG III.i.32
And that thou maist perceiue my feare of this, And, that thou mayst perceive my fear of this,TG III.i.33
Knowing that tender youth is soone suggested, Knowing that tender youth is soon suggested,TG III.i.34
I nightly lodge her in an vpper Towre, I nightly lodge her in an upper tower,TG III.i.35
The key whereof, my selfe haue euer kept: The key whereof myself have ever kept;TG III.i.36
And thence she cannot be conuay'd away. And thence she cannot be conveyed away.TG III.i.37
Vpon mine Honor, he shall neuer know Upon mine honour, he shall never knowTG III.i.48
That I had any light from thee of this. That I had any light from thee of this.TG III.i.49
Sir Valentine, whether away so fast? Sir Valentine, whither away so fast?TG III.i.51
Be they of much import? Be they of much import?TG III.i.55
Nay then no matter: stay with me a while, Nay then, no matter; stay with me awhile;TG III.i.58
I am to breake with thee of some affaires I am to break with thee of some affairsTG III.i.59
That touch me neere: wherein thou must be secret. That touch me near, wherein thou must be secret.TG III.i.60
'Tis not vnknown to thee, that I haue sought 'Tis not unknown to thee that I have soughtTG III.i.61
To match my friend Sir Thurio, to my daughter. To match my friend Sir Thurio to my daughter.TG III.i.62
No, trust me, She is peeuish, sullen, froward, No, trust me; she is peevish, sullen, froward,TG III.i.68
Prowd, disobedient, stubborne, lacking duty, Proud, disobedient, stubborn, lacking duty;TG III.i.69
Neither regarding that she is my childe, Neither regarding that she is my child,TG III.i.70
Nor fearing me, as if I were her father: Nor fearing me as if I were her father;TG III.i.71
And may I say to thee, this pride of hers And, may I say to thee, this pride of hers,TG III.i.72
(Vpon aduice) hath drawne my loue from her, Upon advice, hath drawn my love from her;TG III.i.73
And where I thought the remnant of mine age And where I thought the remnant of mine ageTG III.i.74
Should haue beene cherish'd by her child-like dutie, Should have been cherished by her child-like duty,TG III.i.75
I now am full resolu'd to take a wife, I now am full resolved to take a wifeTG III.i.76
And turne her out, to who will take her in: And turn her out to who will take her in.TG III.i.77
Then let her beauty be her wedding dowre: Then let her beauty be her wedding-dower;TG III.i.78
For me, and my possessions she esteemes not. For me and my possessions she esteems not.TG III.i.79
There is a Lady in Verona heere There is a lady of Verona hereTG III.i.81
Whom I affect: but she is nice, and coy, Whom I affect; but she is nice, and coy,TG III.i.82
And naught esteemes my aged eloquence. And naught esteems my aged eloquence.TG III.i.83
Now therefore would I haue thee to my Tutor Now, therefore, would I have thee to my tutor – TG III.i.84
(For long agone I haue forgot to court, For long agone I have forgot to court;TG III.i.85
Besides the fashion of the time is chang'd) Besides, the fashion of the time is changed – TG III.i.86
How, and which way I may bestow my selfe How and which way I may bestow myselfTG III.i.87
To be regarded in her sun-bright eye. To be regarded in her sun-bright eye.TG III.i.88
But she did scorne a present that I sent her, But she did scorn a present that I sent her.TG III.i.92
But she I meane, is promis'd by her friends But she I mean is promised by her friendsTG III.i.106
Vnto a youthfull Gentleman of worth, Unto a youthful gentleman of worth;TG III.i.107
And kept seuerely from resort of men, And kept severely from resort of men,TG III.i.108
That no man hath accesse by day to her. That no man hath access by day to her.TG III.i.109
I, but the doores be lockt, and keyes kept safe, Ay, but the doors be locked, and keys kept safe,TG III.i.111
That no man hath recourse to her by night. That no man hath recourse to her by night.TG III.i.112
Her chamber is aloft, far from the ground, Her chamber is aloft, far from the ground,TG III.i.114
And built so sheluing, that one cannot climbe it And built so shelving that one cannot climb itTG III.i.115
Without apparant hazard of his life. Without apparent hazard of his life.TG III.i.116
Now as thou art a Gentleman of blood Now, as thou art a gentleman of blood,TG III.i.121
Aduise me, where I may haue such a Ladder. Advise me where I may have such a ladder.TG III.i.122
This very night; for Loue is like a childe This very night; for Love is like a child,TG III.i.124
That longs for euery thing that he can come by. That longs for every thing that he can come by.TG III.i.125
But harke thee: I will goe to her alone, But, hark thee; I will go to her alone;TG III.i.127
How shall I best conuey the Ladder thither? How shall I best convey the ladder thither?TG III.i.128
A cloake as long as thine will serue the turne? A cloak as long as thine will serve the turn?TG III.i.131
Then let me see thy cloake, Then let me see thy cloak;TG III.i.132.2
Ile get me one of such another length. I'll get me one of such another length.TG III.i.133
How shall I fashion me to weare a cloake? How shall I fashion me to wear a cloak?TG III.i.135
I pray thee let me feele thy cloake vpon me. I pray thee, let me feel thy cloak upon me.TG III.i.136
What Letter is this same? what's here? to Siluia? What letter is this same? What's here? To Silvia!TG III.i.137
And heere an Engine fit for my proceeding, And here an engine fit for my proceeding.TG III.i.138
Ile be so bold to breake the seale for once. I'll be so bold to break the seal for once.TG III.i.139
My thoughts do harbour with my Siluia nightly, My thoughts do harbour with my Silvia nightly,TG III.i.140
And slaues they are to me, that send them flying. And slaves they are to me, that send them flying.TG III.i.141
Oh, could their Master come, and goe as lightly, O, could their master come and go as lightly,TG III.i.142
Himselfe would lodge where (senceles) they are lying. Himself would lodge where, senseless, they are lying!TG III.i.143
My Herald Thoughts, in thy pure bosome rest-them, My herald thoughts in thy pure bosom rest them,TG III.i.144
While I (their King) that thither them importune While I, their king, that thither them importune,TG III.i.145
Doe curse the grace, that with such grace hath blest them, Do curse the grace that with such grace hath blessed them,TG III.i.146
Because my selfe doe want my seruants fortune. Because myself do want my servants' fortune.TG III.i.147
I curse my selfe, for they are sent by me, I curse myself, for they are sent by me,TG III.i.148
That they should harbour where their Lord should be. That they should harbour where their lord should be.TG III.i.149
What's here? What's here?TG III.i.150
Siluia, this night I will enfranchise thee. Silvia, this night I will enfranchise thee.TG III.i.151
'Tis so: and heere's the Ladder for the purpose. 'Tis so; and here's the ladder for the purpose.TG III.i.152
Why Phaeton (for thou art Merops sonne) Why, Phaeton – for thou art Merops' son – TG III.i.153
Wilt thou aspire to guide the heauenly Car? Wilt thou aspire to guide the heavenly car,TG III.i.154
And with thy daring folly burne the world? And with thy daring folly burn the world?TG III.i.155
Wilt thou reach stars, because they shine on thee? Wilt thou reach stars, because they shine on thee?TG III.i.156
Goe base Intruder, ouer-weening Slaue, Go, base intruder, overweening slave,TG III.i.157
Bestow thy fawning smiles on equall mates, Bestow thy fawning smiles on equal mates;TG III.i.158
And thinke my patience, (more then thy desert) And think my patience, more than thy desert,TG III.i.159
Is priuiledge for thy departure hence. Is privilege for thy departure hence.TG III.i.160
Thanke me for this, more then for all the fauors Thank me for this more than for all the favoursTG III.i.161
Which (all too-much) I haue bestowed on thee. Which, all too much, I have bestowed on thee.TG III.i.162
But if thou linger in my Territories But if thou linger in my territoriesTG III.i.163
Longer then swiftest expedition Longer than swiftest expeditionTG III.i.164
Will giue thee time to leaue our royall Court, Will give thee time to leave our royal court,TG III.i.165
By heauen, my wrath shall farre exceed the loue By heaven, my wrath shall far exceed the loveTG III.i.166
I euer bore my daughter, or thy selfe. I ever bore my daughter or thyself.TG III.i.167
Be gone, I will not heare thy vaine excuse, Be gone; I will not hear thy vain excuse,TG III.i.168
But as thou lou'st thy life, make speed from hence. But, as thou lovest thy life, make speed from hence.TG III.i.169
Sir Thurio, feare not, but that she will loue youSir Thurio, fear not but that she will love youTG III.ii.1
Now Valentine is banish'd from her sight.Now Valentine is banished from her sight.TG III.ii.2
This weake impresse of Loue, is as a figureThis weak impress of love is as a figureTG III.ii.6
Trenched in ice, which with an houres heateTrenched in ice, which with an hour's heatTG III.ii.7
Dissolues to water, and doth loose his forme.Dissolves to water, and doth lose his form.TG III.ii.8
A little time will melt her frozen thoughts,A little time will melt her frozen thoughts,TG III.ii.9
And worthlesse Valentine shall be forgot.And worthless Valentine shall be forgot.TG III.ii.10
How now sir Protheus, is your countrimanHow now, Sir Proteus? Is your countryman,TG III.ii.11
(According to our Proclamation) gon?According to our proclamation, gone?TG III.ii.12
My daughter takes his going grieuously?My daughter takes his going grievously.TG III.ii.14
So I beleeue: but Thurio thinkes not so:So I believe; but Thurio thinks not so.TG III.ii.16
Protheus, the good conceit I hold of thee,Proteus, the good conceit I hold of thee – TG III.ii.17
(For thou hast showne some signe of good desert)For thou hast shown some sign of good desert – TG III.ii.18
Makes me the better to confer with thee.Makes me the better to confer with thee.TG III.ii.19
Thou know'st how willingly, I would effectThou knowest how willingly I would effectTG III.ii.22
The match betweene sir Thurio, and my daughter?The match between Sir Thurio and my daughter?TG III.ii.23
And also, I thinke, thou art not ignorantAnd also, I think, thou art not ignorantTG III.ii.25
How she opposes her against my will?How she opposes her against my will?TG III.ii.26
I, and peruersly, she perseuers so:Ay, and perversely she persevers so.TG III.ii.28
What might we doe to make the girle forgetWhat might we do to make the girl forgetTG III.ii.29
The loue of Valentine, and loue sir Thurio?The love of Valentine, and love Sir Thurio?TG III.ii.30
I, but she'll thinke, that it is spoke in hate.Ay, but she'll think that it is spoke in hate.TG III.ii.34
Then you must vndertake to slander him.Then you must undertake to slander him.TG III.ii.38
Where your good word cannot aduantage him,Where your good word cannot advantage him,TG III.ii.42
Your slander neuer can endamage him;Your slander never can endamage him;TG III.ii.43
Therefore the office is indifferent,Therefore the office is indifferent,TG III.ii.44
Being intreated to it by your friend.Being entreated to it by your friend.TG III.ii.45
And Protheus, we dare trust you in this kinde,And, Proteus, we dare trust you in this kind,TG III.ii.56
Because we know (on Valentines report)Because we know, on Valentine's report,TG III.ii.57
You are already loues firme votary,You are already Love's firm votary,TG III.ii.58
And cannot soone reuolt, and change your minde.And cannot soon revolt and change your mind.TG III.ii.59
Vpon this warrant, shall you haue accesse,Upon this warrant shall you have accessTG III.ii.60
Where you, with Siluia, may conferre at large.Where you with Silvia may confer at large – TG III.ii.61
For she is lumpish, heauy, mellancholly,For she is lumpish, heavy, melancholy,TG III.ii.62
And (for your friends sake) will be glad of you;And, for your friend's sake, will be glad of you – TG III.ii.63
Where you may temper her, by your perswasion,Where you may temper her, by your persuasion,TG III.ii.64
To hate yong Valentine, and loue my friend.To hate young Valentine and love my friend.TG III.ii.65
I,Ay,TG III.ii.71
much is the force of heauen-bred Poesie.Much is the force of heaven-bred poesy.TG III.ii.72
This discipline, showes thou hast bin in loue.This discipline shows thou hast been in love.TG III.ii.88
About it Gentlemen.About it, gentlemen!TG III.ii.95
Euen now about it, I will pardon you.Even now about it! I will pardon you.TG III.ii.98
How now sir Protheus; how now Thurio?How now, Sir Proteus! How now, Thurio!TG V.ii.31
Which of you saw Eglamoure of late?Which of you saw Sir Eglamour of late?TG V.ii.32
Saw you my daughter?Saw you my daughter?TG V.ii.33.3
Why thenWhy then,TG V.ii.34
She's fled vnto that pezant, Valentine;She's fled unto that peasant Valentine;TG V.ii.35
And Eglamoure is in her Company:And Eglamour is in her company.TG V.ii.36
'Tis true: for Frier Laurence met them both'Tis true; for Friar Laurence met them bothTG V.ii.37
As he, in pennance wander'd through the Forrest:As he in penance wandered through the forest;TG V.ii.38
Him he knew well: and guesd that it was she,Him he knew well, and guessed that it was she,TG V.ii.39
But being mask'd, he was not sure of it.But, being masked, he was not sure of it;TG V.ii.40
Besides she did intend ConfessionBesides, she did intend confessionTG V.ii.41
At Patricks Cell this euen, and there she was not.At Patrick's cell this even; and there she was not.TG V.ii.42
These likelihoods confirme her flight from hence;These likelihoods confirm her flight from hence;TG V.ii.43
Therefore I pray you stand, not to discourse,Therefore, I pray you, stand not to discourse,TG V.ii.44
But mount you presently, and meete with meBut mount you presently, and meet with meTG V.ii.45
Vpon the rising of the Mountaine footeUpon the rising of the mountain-footTG V.ii.46
That leads toward Mantua, whether they are fled:That leads towards Mantua, whither they are fled.TG V.ii.47
Dispatch (sweet Gentlemen) and follow me.Dispatch, sweet gentlemen, and follow me.TG V.ii.48
Sir Valentine?Sir Valentine?TG V.iv.125.2
The more degenerate and base art thouThe more degenerate and base art thouTG V.iv.137
To make such meanes for her, as thou hast done,To make such means for her as thou hast done,TG V.iv.138
And leaue her on such slight conditions.And leave her on such slight conditions.TG V.iv.139
Now, by the honor of my Ancestry,Now, by the honour of my ancestry,TG V.iv.140
I doe applaud thy spirit, Valentine,I do applaud thy spirit, Valentine,TG V.iv.141
And thinke thee worthy of an Empresse loue:And think thee worthy of an empress' love.TG V.iv.142
Know then, I heere forget all former greefes,Know, then, I here forget all former griefs,TG V.iv.143
Cancell all grudge, repeale thee home againe,Cancel all grudge, repeal thee home again,TG V.iv.144
Plead a new state in thy vn-riual'd merit,Plead a new state in thy unrivalled merit,TG V.iv.145
To which I thus subscribe: Sir Valentine,To which I thus subscribe: Sir Valentine.TG V.iv.146
Thou art a Gentleman, and well deriu'd,Thou art a gentleman, and well derived;TG V.iv.147
Take thou thy Siluia, for thou hast deseru'd her.Take thou thy Silvia, for thou hast deserved her.TG V.iv.148
I grant it (for thine owne) what ere it be.I grant it, for thine own, whate'er it be.TG V.iv.152
Thou hast preuaild, I pardon them and thee:Thou hast prevailed; I pardon them and thee;TG V.iv.159
Dispose of them, as thou knowst their deserts.Dispose of them as thou knowest their deserts.TG V.iv.160
Come, let vs goe, we will include all iarres,Come, let us go; we will include all jarsTG V.iv.161
With Triumphes, Mirth, and rare solemnity.With triumphs, mirth, and rare solemnity.TG V.iv.162
I think the Boy hath grace in him, he blushes.I think the boy hath grace in him; he blushes.TG V.iv.166
What meane you by that saying?What mean you by that saying?TG V.iv.168
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL