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Search phrase: weeds

Plays

 43 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.110Have power to utter. O, then we bring forth weedsHaue power to vtter. Oh then we bring forth weeds,
CoriolanusCor II.ii.103Turn terror into sport. As weeds beforeTurne terror into sport: as Weeds before
CoriolanusCor II.iii.153His humble weeds. Will you dismiss the people?his humble Weeds: / Will you dismisse the People?
CymbelineCym IV.ii.390With wild wood-leaves and weeds I ha' strewed his graveWith wild wood-leaues & weeds, I ha' strew'd his graue
CymbelineCym V.i.23Of these Italian weeds, and suit myselfOf these Italian weedes, and suite my selfe
HamletHam III.ii.266Thou mixture rank, of midnight weeds collected,Thou mixture ranke, of Midnight Weeds collected,
HamletHam III.iv.152And do not spread the compost on the weedsAnd do not spred the Compost or the Weedes,
HamletHam IV.vii.79Than settled age his sables and his weeds,
HamletHam IV.vii.172There on the pendent boughs her crownet weedsThere on the pendant boughes, her Coronet weeds
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iv.54Most subject is the fattest soil to weeds,Most subiect is the fattest Soyle to Weedes:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.31Now 'tis the spring, and weeds are shallow-rooted;Now 'tis the Spring, and Weeds are shallow-rooted,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.vi.21For what doth cherish weeds but gentle air?For what doth cherrish Weeds, but gentle ayre?
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.229Tell him my mourning weeds are laid aside,Tell him, my mourning weeds are layde aside,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.104‘ Tell him,’ quoth she, ‘ my mourning weeds are done,Tell him (quoth she) / My mourning Weedes are done,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.452Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds;Lillies that fester, smel far worse then weeds,
King LearKL IV.iv.3Crowned with rank fumiter and furrow-weeds,Crown'd with ranke Fenitar, and furrow weeds,
King LearKL IV.iv.5Darnel, and all the idle weeds that growDarnell, and all the idle weedes that grow
King LearKL IV.vii.7These weeds are memories of those worser hours.These weedes are memories of those worser houres:
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.96He weeds the corn, and still lets grow the weeding.Hee weedes the corne, and still lets grow the weeding.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.796If frosts and fasts, hard lodging and thin weeds,If frosts, and fasts, hard lodging, and thin weeds
MacbethMac V.ii.30To dew the sovereign flower and drown the weeds.To dew the Soueraigne Flower, and drowne the Weeds:
Measure for MeasureMM I.iii.20The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,(The needfull bits and curbes to headstrong weedes,)
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.77Weeds of Athens he doth wear.Weedes of Athens he doth weare:
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iii.30Come, let us hence, and put on other weeds;Come let vs hence, and put on other weedes,
Richard IIR2 III.iv.38The noisome weeds which without profit suckThe noysome Weedes, that without profit sucke
Richard IIR2 III.iv.44Is full of weeds, her fairest flowers choked up,Is full of Weedes, her fairest Flowers choakt vp,
Richard IIR2 III.iv.50The weeds which his broad-spreading leaves did shelter,The Weeds that his broad-spreading Leaues did shelter,
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.13‘ Small herbs have grace; great weeds do grow apace.’Small Herbes haue grace, great Weeds do grow apace.
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.15Because sweet flowers are slow and weeds make haste.Because sweet Flowres are slow, and Weeds make hast.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.103You said that idle weeds are fast in growth.You said, that idle Weeds are fast in growth:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.4With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.With balefull weedes, and precious Iuiced flowers,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.39In tattered weeds, with overwhelming brows,In tattred weeds, with ouerwhelming browes,
The TempestTem IV.i.21The union of your bed with weeds so loathlyThe vnion of your bed, with weedes so loathly
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.73Hail, Rome, victorious in thy mourning weeds!Haile Rome: / Victorious in thy Mourning Weedes:
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.18Away with slavish weeds and servile thoughts!Away with slauish weedes, and idle thoughts,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.43And were they but attired in grave weeds,And were they but attired in graue weedes,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.195No funeral rite, nor man in mourning weed,No Funerall Rite, nor man in mournfull Weeds:
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.239To see great Hector in his weeds of peace,To see great Hector in his weedes of peace;
Twelfth NightTN V.i.252Where lie my maiden weeds; by whose gentle helpWhere lye my maiden weeds: by whose gentle helpe,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.270And let me see thee in thy woman's weeds.And let me see thee in thy womans weedes.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.42Gentle Lucetta, fit me with such weedsGentle Lucetta, fit me with such weedes
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.15Walking in Thebes? Scars and bare weedsWalking in Thebs? Skars, and bare weedes
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.1These your unusual weeds to each part of youThese your vnvsuall weeds, to each part of you

Poems

 5 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
The Rape of LucreceLuc.281 As corn o'ergrown by weeds, so heedful fear As corne ore-growne by weedes: so heedfull feare
The Rape of LucreceLuc.870 Unwholesome weeds take root with precious flowers; Vnholsome weeds take roote with precious flowrs,
SonnetsSonn.69.12 To thy fair flower add the rank smell of weeds. To thy faire flower ad the rancke smell of weeds,
SonnetsSonn.94.14 Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Lillies that fester, smell far worse then weeds.
SonnetsSonn.124.4 Weeds among weeds, or flowers with flowers gathered. Weeds among weeds, or flowers with flowers gatherd.

Glossary

 2 result(s).
darnelweeds, cockle, tares
weedymade of weeds

Thesaurus

 1 result(s).
weeds, made ofweedy

Themes and Topics

 1 result(s).
Plants... type of weed associated with the ‘idle weeds that grow / in our sustaining corn’ ...
...heard here associated with the ‘idle weeds that grow / in our sustaining corn’ ...
... type of weed associated with the ‘idle weeds that grow / in our sustaining corn’ ...
...sibly burdock associated with the ‘idle weeds that grow / in our sustaining corn’ ...
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