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Search phrase: tell

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 1104 result(s). alternate result(s)
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.27Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marry.Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marrie?
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.66Sirrah, tell my gentlewoman I would speakSirra tell my gentlewoman I would speake
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.170To say thou dost not. Therefore tell me true;To say thou doost not: therefore tell me true,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.171But tell me then, 'tis so; for, look, thy cheeksBut tell me then 'tis so, for looke, thy cheekes
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.180.1To tell me truly.To tell me truelie.
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.214.3Wherefore? tell true.Wherefore? tell true.
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.215I will tell truth, by grace itself I swear.I will tell truth, by grace it selfe I sweare:
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.173And tell her she is thine: to whom I promiseAnd tell her she is thine: to whom I promise
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.197I must tell thee, sirrah, I write man, to whichI must tell thee sirrah, I write Man: to which
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.84I would not tell you what I would, my lord.I would not tell you what I would my Lord:
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.42come will tell you more. For my part, I only hear yourcome will tell you more. For my part I onely heare your
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.93To tell him that his sword can never winto tell him that his sword can neuer winne
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.97Lafew. When his disguise and he is parted tell me what aLafew when his disguise and he is parted, tell me what
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.i.88Go tell the Count Rossillion and my brotherGo tell the Count Rossillion and my brother,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.24But take the highest to witness. Then, pray you, tell me:But take the high'st to witnesse: then pray you tell me,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.9bounty to sing happiness to him. I will tell you a thing,bounty to sing happinesse to him. I will tell you a thing,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.159hour, I will tell true. Let me see: Spurio, a hundred andhoure, I will tell true. Let me see, Spurio a hundred &
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.55tell thee so before, because I would not fall out withtell thee so before, because I would not fall out with
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.67tell you, since I heard of the good lady's death and thattell you, since I heard of the good Ladies death, and that
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.234Tell me, sirrah – but tell me true I charge you,Tell me sirrah, but tell me true I charge you,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.282.2I'll never tell you.Ile neuer tell you.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.i.14If it be love indeed, tell me how much.If it be Loue indeed, tell me how much.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.44Nay, come, tell Iras hers.Nay come, tell Iras hers.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.53I cannot scratch mine ear. Prithee, tell herI cannot scratch mine eare. Prythee tel her
Antony and CleopatraAC I.v.57Which seemed to tell them his remembrance layWhich seem'd to tell them, his remembrance lay
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.195I will tell you.I will tell you,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.87An host of tongues, but let ill tidings tellAn host of tongues, but let ill tydings tell
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.29.2Be pleased to tell us – Be pleas'd to tell vs,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.53Go hang, sir, hang! Tell me of that? Away!Go hang sir, hang: tell me of that? Away:
Antony and CleopatraAC III.ii.46.2I'll tell you in your ear.Ile tell you in your eare.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vi.45The neighs of horse to tell of her approachThe neighes of Horse to tell of her approach,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.20To him again! Tell him he wears the roseTo him againe, tell him he weares the Rose
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.75I kiss his conquering hand. Tell him I am promptI kisse his conqu'ring hand: Tell him, I am prompt
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.77Till him from his all-obeying breath I hearTell him, from his all-obeying breath, I heare
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.140Tell him thy entertainment. Look thou sayTell him thy entertainment: looke thou say
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.148My speech and what is done, tell him he hasMy speech, and what is done, tell him he has
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.vi.26I tell you true. Best you safed the bringerI tell you true: Best you saf't the bringer
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.viii.9Tell them your feats, whilst they with joyful tearsTell them your feats, whil'st they with ioyfull teares
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.5Say they know not, they cannot tell, look grimly,Say, they know not, they cannot tell, looke grimly,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiii.7Mardian, go tell him I have slain myself;Mardian, go tell him I haue slaine my selfe:
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xv.76To tell them that this world did equal theirsTo tell them that this World did equall theyrs,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.2Being so frustrate, tell him, he mocksBeing so frustrate, tell him, / He mockes
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.49But I will tell you at some meeter season.But I will tell you at some meeter Season,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.13Did tell me of you, bade me trust you, butDid tell me of you, bad me trust you, but
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.16Would have a queen his beggar, you must tell himWould haue a Queece his begger, you must tell him,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.28.2Pray you, tell himPray you tell him,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.72.1I cannot tell.I cannot tell.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.74You laugh when boys or women tell their dreams;You laugh when Boyes or Women tell their Dreames,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.107I am loath to tell you what I would you knew.I am loath to tell you what, I would you knew.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.200I tell you this: Caesar through SyriaI tell you this: Casar through Syria
As You Like ItAYL I.i.99Can you tell if Rosalind, the Duke's daughter, beCan you tell if Rosalind the Dukes daughter bee
As You Like ItAYL I.i.132but he is resolute. I'll tell thee, Charles, it is the stubbornestbut he is resolute. Ile tell thee Charles, it is the stubbornest
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.104Yet tell us the manner of the wrestling.Yet tell vs the manner of the Wrastling.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.105I will tell you the beginning; and, if it pleaseI wil tell you the beginning: and if it please
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.147You will take little delight in it, I can tell you, thereYou wil take little delight in it, I can tell you there
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.201If I had a thunderbolt in mine eye, I can tell whoIf I had a thunderbolt in mine eie, I can tell who
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.257I thank you, sir; and pray you tell me this,I thanke you Sir; and pray you tell me this,
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.266But I can tell you that of late this DukeBut I can tell you, that of late this Duke
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.55Tell me whereon the likelihood depends.Tell me whereon the likelihoods depends?
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.7Go, seek him, tell him I would speak with him.Go seeke him, tell him I would speake with him.
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.62Fie on thee! I can tell what thou wouldst do.Fie on thee. I can tell what thou wouldst do.
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.201Go to my cave and tell me. – Good old man,Go to my Caue, and tell mee. Good old man,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.184vehemence, tell me who it is.vehemence, tell me who it is.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.191South Sea of discovery. I prithee tell me who is itSouth-sea of discouerie. I pre'thee tell me, who is it
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.300paces with divers persons. I'll tell you who Timepaces, with diuers persons: Ile tel you who Time
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.352I am he that is so love-shaked. I pray you, tellI am he that is so Loue-shak'd, I pray you tel
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.383Love is merely a madness and, I tell you,Loue is meerely a madnesse, and I tel you,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.409Now, by the faith of my love, I will. Tell meNow by the faith of my loue, I will ; Tel me
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.412the way you shall tell me where in the forest you live.the way, you shal tell me, where in the Forrest you liue:
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.77and have a good priest that can tell you what marriageand haue a good Priest that can tel you what marriage
As You Like ItAYL III.v.59For I must tell you friendly in your ear,For I must tell you friendly in your eare,
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.132Now tell me how long you would have herNow tell me how long you would haue her,
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.200deep I am in love. I'll tell thee, Aliena, I cannot be outdeepe I am in loue: ile tell thee Aliena, I cannot be out
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.98.2I pray you, tell it.I pray you tell it.
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.137To tell you what I was, since my conversionTo tell you what I was, since my conuersion
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.154To tell this story, that you might excuseTo tell this story, that you might excuse
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.167think this was well counterfeited. I pray you, tell yourthinke this was well counterfeited, I pray you
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.168brother how well I counterfeited. Heigh-ho!tell your brother how well I counterfeited: heigh-ho.
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.25Did your brother tell you how I counterfeitedDid your brother tell you how I counterfeyted
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.78Good shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love.Good shepheard, tell this youth what 'tis to loue
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.121To tell sad stories of my own mishaps.To tell sad stories of my owne mishaps.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.53Stop in your wind, sir. Tell me this, I pray:Stop in your winde sir, tell me this I pray?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.59Tell me, and dally not: where is the money?Tell me, and dally not, where is the monie?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.73And tell me how thou hast disposed thy charge.And tell me how thou hast dispos'd thy charge.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.21What means this jest, I pray you, master, tell me?What meanes this iest, I pray you Master tell me? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.43Shall I tell you why?Shall I tell you why? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.14Your own handwriting would tell you what I think.Your owne hand-writing would tell you what I thinke. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.39Right, sir, I'll tell you when an you'll tell me wherefore.Right sir, Ile tell you when, and you'll tell me wherefore. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.50.1And so tell your master.and so tell your Master. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.52Have at you with another. That‘s When? Can you tell?'Haue at you with another, that's when? can you tell? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.57.2Can you tell for whose sake?Can you tell for whose sake? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.187What I should think of this I cannot tell.What I should thinke of this, I cannot tell:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.104Give her this key, and tell her in the deskGiue her this key, and tell her in the Deske
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.107Tell her I am arrested in the street,Tell her, I am arrested in the streete,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.ii.43What, is he arrested? Tell me at whose suit. What is he arrested? tell me at whose suite?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.ii.45But he's in a suit of buff which 'rested him, that can I tell. but is in a suite of buffe which rested him, that can I tell,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.ii.49Tell me, was he arrested on a band? Tell me, was he arested on a band?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.93And tell his wife that, being lunatic,And tell his wife, that being Lunaticke, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.7I tell you, 'twill sound harshly in her ears.I tell you 'twill sound harshly in her eares.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.67Still did I tell him it was vile and bad.Still did I tell him, it was vilde and bad. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.180Mistress, upon my life I tell you true.Mistris, vpon my life I tel you true, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.301But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice?But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.319Tell me thou art my son Antipholus.Tell me, thou art my sonne Antipholus. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.327I tell thee, Syracusian, twenty yearsI tell thee Siracusian, twentie yeares 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.354If thou art she, tell me, where is that sonIf thou art she, tell me, where is that sonne 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.361What then became of them I cannot tell.What then became of them, I cannot tell: 
CoriolanusCor I.i.63I tell you, friends, most charitable careI tell you Friends, most charitable care
CoriolanusCor I.i.87Or be accused of folly. I shall tell youOr be accus'd of Folly. I shall tell you
CoriolanusCor I.i.105Sir, I shall tell you. With a kind of smile,Sir, I shall tell you with a kinde of Smile,
CoriolanusCor I.i.122.2I will tell you.I will tell you,
CoriolanusCor I.iii.14returned his brows bound with oak. I tell thee, daughter,return'd, his browes bound with Oake. I tell thee Daughter,
CoriolanusCor I.iii.44At Grecian sword, contemning. Tell ValeriaAt Grecian sword. Contenning, tell Valeria
CoriolanusCor I.iii.90In truth, la, go with me, and I'll tell you excellentIn truth la go with me, and Ile tell you excellent
CoriolanusCor I.vi.46Will the time serve to tell? I do not think.Will the time serue to tell, I do not thinke:
CoriolanusCor I.ix.1If I should tell thee o'er this thy day's work,If I should tell thee o're this thy dayes Worke,
CoriolanusCor II.i.13two are old men; tell me one thing that I shall ask you.two are old men, tell me one thing that I shall aske you.
CoriolanusCor II.i.58deadly that tell you have good faces. If you see this in thedeadly, that tell you haue good faces, if you see this in the
CoriolanusCor II.iii.6us his wounds and tell us his deeds, we are to put ourvs his wounds, and tell vs his deeds, we are to put our
CoriolanusCor II.iii.8tell us his noble deeds, we must also tell him our nobletel vs his Noble deeds, we must also tell him our Noble
CoriolanusCor II.iii.62We do, sir. Tell us what hath brought you to't.We do Sir, tell vs what hath brought you too't.
CoriolanusCor II.iii.212Get you hence instantly, and tell those friendsGet you hence instantly, and tell those friends,
CoriolanusCor III.i.61.2Tell me of corn!Tell me of Corne:
CoriolanusCor III.ii.43I'th' war do grow together. Grant that, and tell meI'th' Warre do grow together: Grant that, and tell me
CoriolanusCor IV.i.25Heart-hardening spectacles. Tell these sad womenHeart-hardning spectacles. Tell these sad women,
CoriolanusCor IV.ii.22And for Rome's good. I'll tell thee what – yet go.And for Romes good, Ile tell thee what: yet goe:
CoriolanusCor IV.iii.22This lies glowing, I can tell you, and is almost matureThis lyes glowing I can tell you, and is almost mature
CoriolanusCor IV.iii.36I shall between this and supper tell you mostI shall betweene this and Supper, tell you most
CoriolanusCor IV.v.36What, you will not? Prithee tellWhat you will not? Prythee tell
CoriolanusCor IV.v.121Bestride my threshold. Why, thou Mars, I tell theeBestride my Threshold. Why, thou Mars I tell thee,
CoriolanusCor IV.v.160methought – I cannot tell how to term it.me thought, I cannot tell how to tearme it.
CoriolanusCor IV.v.173Faith, look you, one cannot tellFaith looke you, one cannot tell
CoriolanusCor IV.v.176O slaves, I can tell you news – Oh Slaues, I can tell you Newes,
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.56.2Tell not me.Tell not me:
CoriolanusCor V.i.64I tell you he does sit in gold, his eyeI tell you, he doe's sit in Gold, his eye
CoriolanusCor V.ii.13.2I tell thee, fellow,I tell thee Fellow,
CoriolanusCor V.ii.33Has he dined, canst thou tell? For I would notHa's he din'd can'st thou tell? For I would not
CoriolanusCor V.iii.83Again with Rome's mechanics. Tell me notAgaine, with Romes Mechanickes. Tell me not
CoriolanusCor V.iii.174This boy, that cannot tell what he would haveThis Boy that cannot tell what he would haue,
CoriolanusCor V.vi.1Go tell the lords o'th' city I am here.Go tell the Lords a'th' City, I am heere:
CoriolanusCor V.vi.15.2Sir, I cannot tell.Sir, I cannot tell,
CoriolanusCor V.vi.85But tell the traitor in the highest degreeBut tell the Traitor in the highest degree
CymbelineCym I.i.55Even out of your report. But pray you tell me,euen out of your report. / But pray you tell me,
CymbelineCym I.iv.26Most pretty things to say: ere I could tell himMost pretty things to say: Ere I could tell him
CymbelineCym I.vi.50I'll tell thee on the instant, thou art thenIle tell thee on the instant, thou art then
CymbelineCym I.vi.66That I mean to thee. Tell thy mistress howThat I meane to thee. Tell thy Mistris how
CymbelineCym II.iii.146I hope it be not gone to tell my lordI hope it be not gone, to tell my Lord
CymbelineCym III.ii.50He is at Milford-Haven: read, and tell meHe is at Milford-Hauen: Read, and tell me
CymbelineCym III.ii.61Tell me how Wales was made so happy asTell me how Wales was made so happy, as
CymbelineCym III.iii.89When on my three-foot stool I sit, and tellWhen on my three-foot stoole I sit, and tell
CymbelineCym III.iv.175Present yourself, desire his service: tell himPresent your selfe, desire his seruice: tell him
CymbelineCym III.vi.12When rich ones scarce tell true. To lapse in fulnessWhen Rich-ones scarse tell true. To lapse in Fulnesse
CymbelineCym IV.ii.103I cannot tell: long is it since I saw him,I cannot tell: Long is it since I saw him,
CymbelineCym IV.ii.153And tell the fishes he's the queen's son, Cloten.And tell the Fishes, hee's the Queenes Sonne, Cloten,
CymbelineCym V.iii.92A leg of Rome shall not return to tellA legge of Rome shall not returne to tell
CymbelineCym V.iv.186end, I think you'll never return to tell on.end, I thinke you'l neuer returne to tell one.
CymbelineCym V.iv.187I tell thee, fellow, there are none want eyes toI tell thee, Fellow, there are none want eyes, to
CymbelineCym V.v.115I'll tell you, sir, in private, if you pleaseIle tell you (Sir) in priuate, if you please
CymbelineCym V.v.297.1To tell this tale of mine.To tell this tale of mine.
HamletHam I.i.70Good now, sit down, and tell me he that knowsGood now sit downe, & tell me he that knowes
HamletHam I.ii.126But the great cannon to the clouds shall tell,But the great Cannon to the Clowds shall tell,
HamletHam I.ii.238While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.While one with moderate hast might tell a hun-(dred.
HamletHam I.iii.95And that in way of caution – I must tell youAnd that in way of caution: I must tell you,
HamletHam I.iv.46Let me not burst in ignorance. But tellLet me not burst in Ignorance; but tell
HamletHam I.v.14To tell the secrets of my prison house,To tell the secrets of my Prison-House;
HamletHam I.v.119.1Good my lord, tell it.Good my Lord tell it.
HamletHam I.v.126.1To tell us this.to tell vs this.
HamletHam I.v.138It is an honest ghost, that let me tell you.It is an honest Ghost, that let me tell you:
HamletHam II.ii.133As I perceived it, I must tell you that,As I perceiued it, I must tell you that
HamletHam II.ii.293I will tell you why. So shall my anticipationI will tell you why; so shall my anticipation
HamletHam II.ii.372garb, lest my extent to the players, which I tell you mustGarbe, lest my extent to the Players (which I tell you must
HamletHam II.ii.385I will prophesy he comes to tell me of theI will Prophesie. Hee comes to tell me of the
HamletHam II.ii.388My lord, I have news to tell you.My Lord, I haue Newes to tell you.
HamletHam II.ii.389My lord, I have news to tell you. When RosciusMy Lord, I haue Newes to tell you. / When Rossius
HamletHam III.i.180You need not tell us what Lord Hamlet said.You neede not tell vs, what Lord Hamlet saide,
HamletHam III.ii.53Masters, tell him of it.
HamletHam III.ii.151keep counsel. They'll tell all.keepe counsell, they'l tell all.
HamletHam III.ii.152Will 'a tell us what this show meant?Will they tell vs what this shew meant?
HamletHam III.ii.154you ashamed to show, he'll not shame to tell you whatyou asham'd to shew, hee'l not shame to tell you what
HamletHam III.iii.35.1And tell you what I know.And tell you what I know.
HamletHam III.iv.2Tell him his pranks have been too broad to bear with,Tell him his prankes haue been too broad to beare with,
HamletHam IV.ii.7Tell us where 'tis, that we may take it thenceTell vs where 'tis, that we may take it thence,
HamletHam IV.ii.25My lord, you must tell us where the bodyMy Lord, you must tell vs where the body
HamletHam IV.iv.2Tell him that by his licence FortinbrasTell him that by his license, Fortinbras
HamletHam IV.v.127Acts little of his will. Tell me, Laertes,Acts little of his will. Tell me Laertes,
HamletHam IV.vi.28to tell thee. Farewell.to tell thee, Farewell.
HamletHam IV.vii.5.2It well appears. But tell meIt well appeares. But tell me,
HamletHam IV.vii.55That I shall live and tell him to his teethThat I shall liue and tell him to his teeth;
HamletHam V.i.3I tell thee she is. Therefore make herI tell thee she is, and therefore make her
HamletHam V.i.52Ay, tell me that, and unyoke.I, tell me that, and vnyoake.
HamletHam V.i.53Marry, now I can tell.Marry, now I can tell.
HamletHam V.i.55Mass, I cannot tell.Masse, I cannot tell. Enter Hamlet and Horatio a farre off.
HamletHam V.i.100sconce with a dirty shovel, and will not tell him of hisSconce with a dirty Shouell, and will not tell him of his
HamletHam V.i.144Cannot you tell that? Every fool can tellCannot you tell that? euery foole can tell
HamletHam V.i.190you to my lady's table and tell her, let her paint an inchyou to my Ladies Chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch
HamletHam V.i.192that. Prithee, Horatio, tell me one thing.that: prythee Horatio tell me one thing.
HamletHam V.i.236May violets spring! I tell thee, churlish priest,May Violets spring. I tell thee (churlish Priest)
HamletHam V.ii.101 – I cannot tell how. But, my lord, his majesty bade meI cannot tell how: but my Lord, his Maiesty bad me
HamletHam V.ii.331Is strict in his arrest – O, I could tell you – Is strick'd in his Arrest) oh I could tell you.
HamletHam V.ii.343.1To tell my story.To tell my Storie.
HamletHam V.ii.351So tell him, with th' occurrents, more and less,So tell him with the occurrents more and lesse,
HamletHam V.ii.364To tell him his commandment is fulfilled,To tell him his command'ment is fulfill'd,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.29And bootless 'tis to tell you we will go.And bootlesse 'tis to tell you we will go:
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.70tell you.tell you.
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.185that this same fat rogue will tell us when we meet atthat this fat Rogue will tell vs, when we meete at
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.114I tell thee, he durst as well have met the devil aloneI tell thee, he durst as well haue met the diuell alone,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.125And tell him so, for I will ease my heart,And tell him so: for I will ease my heart,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.252Good uncle, tell your tale. I have done.Good Vncle tell your tale, for I haue done.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.40Ay, when? Canst tell? Lend me thyI, when, canst tell? Lend mee thy
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.57with him in gold – I heard him tell it to one of hiswith him in Gold: I heard him tell it to one of his
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.10sleep, to drink. But I tell you, my lord fool, out of thissleepe, to drinke: but I tell you (my Lord foole) out of this
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.35Hang him, let him tell the King, we are prepared. I willHang him, let him tell the King we are prepared. I will
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.42Tell me, sweet lord, what is it that takes from theeTell me (sweet Lord) what is't that takes from thee
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.91An if thou wilt not tell me all things true.if thou wilt not tel me true.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.102Nay, tell me if you speak in jest or no?Nay, tell me if thou speak'st in iest, or no.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.10Wales yet I am the king of courtesy, and tell me flatly IWales, yet I am the King of Curtesie: telling me flatly I
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.19life. I tell thee, Ned, thou hast lost much honour thatlife. I tell thee Ned, thou hast lost much honor, that
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.188buckram suits. I tell thee what, Hal, if I tell thee a lie,Buckrom Sutes. I tell thee what, Hal, if I tell thee a Lye,
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.229thy hand? Come, tell us your reason. What sayest thouthy Hand? Come, tell vs your reason: what say'st thou
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.234not tell you on compulsion. Give you a reason onnot tell you on compulsion. Giue you a reason on
Henry IV Part 11H4 Ii.iv.296Faith, tell me now in earnest, how cameTell mee now in earnest, how came
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.358shall have good trading that way. But tell me, Hal, artshall haue good trading that way. But tell me Hal, art
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.420 banish. And tell me now, thou naughty varlet, tell me wherebanish. And tell mee now, thou naughtie Varlet, tell mee, where
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.34To tell you once again that at my birthTo tell you once againe, that at my Birth
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.55By telling truth. Tell truth, and shame the devil.By telling truth. Tell truth, and shame the Deuill.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.58O, while you live, tell truth, and shame the devil!Oh, while you liue, tell truth, and shame the Deuill.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.149As puts me from my faith. I tell you what – As puts me from my Faith. I tell you what,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.163As mines of India. Shall I tell you, cousin?as Mynes of India. / Shall I tell you, Cousin,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.190Good father, tell her that she and my aunt PercyGood Father tell her, that she and my Aunt Percy
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.11To punish my mistreadings. Tell me else,To punish my Mistreadings. Tell me else,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.48That men would tell their children ‘ This is he!’That men would tell their Children, This is hee:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.121But wherefore do I tell these news to thee?But wherefore doe I tell these Newes to thee?
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.122Why, Harry, do I tell thee of my foes,Why, Harry, doe I tell thee of my Foes,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.134Be bold to tell you that I am your son,Be bold to tell you, that I am your Sonne,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.82O Jesu, I have heard the Prince tell him I knowI haue heard the Prince tell him, I know
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.21I prithee tell me, doth he keep his bed?I prethee tell me, doth he keepe his Bed?
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.ii.54already. The King I can tell you looks for us all, we mustalreadie. The King, I can tell you, lookes for vs all: we must
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.ii.59hath already made thee butter. But tell me, Jack, whosehath alreadie made thee Butter: but tell me, Iack, whose
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.85If once they join in trial. Tell your nephew,If once they ioyne in triall. Tell your Nephew,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.109So tell your cousin, and bring me wordSo tell your Cousin, and bring me word,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.32Lord Douglas, go you and tell him so.Lord Dowglas: Go you and tell him so.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.49But I and Harry Monmouth! Tell me, tell me,But I and Harry Monmouth. Tell me, tell mee,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.65There did he pause. But let me tell the world – There did he pause. But let me tell the World,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iii.5Because some tell me that thou art a king.Because some tell me, that thou art a King.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iii.6They tell thee true.They tell thee true.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iii.24Why didst thou tell me that thou wert a king?Why didst thou tell me, that thou wer't a King?
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.75no boy's play here, I can tell you.no Boyes play heere, I can tell you.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.130Did you not tell me this fat man was dead?Did you not tell me this Fat man was dead?
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.2.2Tell thou the EarlTell thou the Earle
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.51.2My lord, I'll tell you what.My Lord: Ile tell you what,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.69Is apter than thy tongue to tell thy errand.Is apter then thy Tongue, to tell thy Errand.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.88Tell thou an earl his divination lies,Tell thou thy Earle, his Diuination Lies,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.66Boy, tell him I am deaf.Boy, tell him, I am deafe.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.77the name of rebellion can tell how to make it.the name of Rebellion can tell how to make it.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.83your soldiership aside, and give me leave to tell you youyour Souldier-ship aside, and giue mee leaue to tell you, you
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.86I give thee leave to tell me so? I lay aside thatI giue thee leaue to tell me so? I lay a-side that
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.114What tell you me of it? Be it asWhat tell you me of it? be it as
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.170go – I cannot tell. Virtue is of so little regard in thesego: I cannot tell. Vertue is of so little regard in these
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.28you should talk so idly! Tell me, how many good youngyou should talke so idlely? Tell me how many good yong
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.31Shall I tell thee one thing, Poins?Shall I tell thee one thing, Pointz?
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.36will tell.tell.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.37Marry, I tell thee it is not meet that IWhy, I tell thee, it is not meet, that I
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.38should be sad now my father is sick. Albeit I could tellshould be sad now my Father is sicke: albeit I could tell
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.44persistency. Let the end try the man. But I tell thee,persistencie. Let the end try the man. But I tell thee,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.81Tilly-fally, Sir John, ne'er tell me; an yourTilly-fally (Sir Iohn) neuer tell me, your
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.88an ill name ’ – now 'a said so, I can tell whereupon.an ill Name: now hee said so, I can tell whereupon:
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.149Not I; I tell thee what, Corporal Bardolph, INot I: I tell thee what, Corporall Bardolph, I
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.250Will you tell me, Master Shallow, how toWill you tell me (Master Shallow) how to
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.140To know your griefs, to tell you from his graceTo know your Griefes; to tell you, from his Grace,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iv.52And how accompanied? Canst thou tell that?And how accompanyed? Canst thou tell that?
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iv.96As those that I am come to tell you of!As those that I am come to tell you of.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.13Heard he the good news yet? Tell it him.Heard hee the good newes yet? Tell it him.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.24pretty little tiny kickshaws, tell William cook.pretty little tine Kickshawes, tell William Cooke.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.41And tell him who hath sent me after him.And tell him, who hath sent me after him.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.7Nut-hook, nut-hook, you lie. Come on, I 'll tellNut-hooke, nut-hooke, you Lye: Come on, Ile tell
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.18I'll tell you what, you thin man in a censer, I willIle tell thee what, thou thin man in a Censor; I will
Henry VH5 I.i.1My lord, I'll tell you. That self bill is urgedMy Lord, Ile tell you, that selfe Bill is vrg'd,
Henry VH5 I.ii.246.1Tell us the Dauphin's mind.Tell vs the Dolphins minde.
Henry VH5 I.ii.265Tell him he hath made a match with such a wranglerTell him, he hath made a match with such a Wrangler,
Henry VH5 I.ii.274But tell the Dauphin I will keep my state,But tell the Dolphin, I will keepe my State,
Henry VH5 I.ii.282And tell the pleasant Prince this mock of hisAnd tell the pleasant Prince, this Mocke of his
Henry VH5 I.ii.292Tell you the Dauphin, I am coming on,Tel you the Dolphin, I am comming on,
Henry VH5 I.ii.295So get you hence in peace; and tell the DauphinSo get you hence in peace: And tell the Dolphin,
Henry VH5 II.i.19I cannot tell; things must be as they may. Men mayI cannot tell, Things must be as they may: men may
Henry VH5 II.i.23plod – there must be conclusions – well, I cannot tell.plodde, there must be Conclusions, well, I cannot tell.
Henry VH5 II.ii.124And tell the legions, ‘ I can never winAnd tell the Legions, I can neuer win
Henry VH5 III.ii.56To the mines? Tell you the Duke, it is not soTo the Mynes? Tell you the Duke, it is not so
Henry VH5 III.ii.134so bold as to tell you, I know the disciplines of war; andso bold as to tell you, I know the disciplines of Warre: and
Henry VH5 III.vi.80I tell you what, Captain Gower; I do perceiveI tell you what, Captaine Gower: I doe perceiue
Henry VH5 III.vi.82the world he is. If I find a hole in his coat, I will tellthe World hee is: if I finde a hole in his Coat, I will tell
Henry VH5 III.vi.93tell your majesty, the Duke is a prave man.tell your Maiestie, the Duke is a praue man.
Henry VH5 III.vi.118Advantage is a better soldier than rashness. Tell himAduantage is a better Souldier then rashnesse. Tell him,
Henry VH5 III.vi.131satisfaction. To this add defiance: and tell him forsatisfaction. To this adde defiance: and tell him for
Henry VH5 III.vi.138And tell thy King I do not seek him now,And tell thy King, I doe not seeke him now,
Henry VH5 III.vi.146Who when they were in health, I tell thee, Herald,Who when they were in health, I tell thee Herald,
Henry VH5 III.vi.151Go, therefore, tell thy master here I am;Goe therefore tell thy Master, heere I am;
Henry VH5 III.vi.154Yet, God before, tell him we will come on,Yet God before, tell him we will come on,
Henry VH5 III.vi.164So tell your master.So tell your Master.
Henry VH5 III.vii.58I tell thee, Constable, my mistress wears hisI tell thee Constable, my Mistresse weares his
Henry VH5 IV.i.54Tell him I'll knock his leek about his pateTell him Ile knock his Leeke about his Pate
Henry VH5 IV.i.217French quarrels enow, if you could tell how to reckon.French Quarrels enow, if you could tell how to reckon.
Henry VH5 IV.iii.108Let me speak proudly: tell the ConstableLet me speake prowdly: Tell the Constable,
Henry VH5 IV.iii.116And my poor soldiers tell me, yet ere nightAnd my poore Souldiers tell me, yet ere Night,
Henry VH5 IV.iii.125Shall yield them little, tell the Constable.Shall yeeld them little, tell the Constable.
Henry VH5 IV.iv.47Tell him my fury shall abate, and ITell him my fury shall abate, and I
Henry VH5 IV.vii.22porn. I tell you, Captain, if you look in the maps of theporne: I tell you Captaine, if you looke in the Maps of the
Henry VH5 IV.vii.50That is he. I'll tell you, there is good men pornThat is he: Ile tell you, there is good men porne
Henry VH5 IV.vii.63Shall taste our mercy. Go and tell them so.Shall taste our mercy. Go and tell them so.
Henry VH5 IV.vii.81.2I tell thee truly, Herald,I tell thee truly Herald,
Henry VH5 IV.vii.105majesty's Welsh plood out of your pody, I can tell youMaiesties Welsh plood out of your pody, I can tell you
Henry VH5 IV.viii.68It is with a good will: I can tell you it will serveIt is with a good will: I can tell you it will serue
Henry VH5 IV.viii.79This note doth tell me of ten thousand FrenchThis Note doth tell me of ten thousand French
Henry VH5 IV.viii.116Is it not lawful, an please your majesty, to tellIs it not lawfull and please your Maiestie, to tell
Henry VH5 V.i.4in all things. I will tell you ass my friend, Captainin all things: I will tell you asse my friend, Captaine
Henry VH5 V.i.12him once again, and then I will tell him a little piece ofhim once againe, and then I will tell him a little piece of
Henry VH5 V.ii.108Pardonnez-moi, I cannot tell vat is ‘ like me.’Pardonne moy, I cannot tell wat is like me.
Henry VH5 V.ii.176I cannot tell wat is dat.I cannot tell wat is dat.
Henry VH5 V.ii.177No, Kate? I will tell thee in French, whichNo, Kate? I will tell thee in French, which
Henry VH5 V.ii.193I cannot tell.I cannot tell.
Henry VH5 V.ii.194Can any of your neighbours tell, Kate?Can any of your Neighbours tell, Kate?
Henry VH5 V.ii.231better; and therefore tell me, most fair Katherine, willbetter: and therefore tell me, most faire Katherine, will
Henry VH5 V.ii.236withal but I will tell thee aloud, ‘ England is thine, withall, but I will tell thee alowd, England is thine,
Henry VH5 V.ii.259I cannot tell wat is baiser en Anglish.I cannot tell wat is buisse en Anglish.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.109The circumstance I'll tell you more at large.The circumstance Ile tell you more at large.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.ii.51And therefore tell her I return great thanksAnd therefore tell her, I returne great thankes,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.53I tell you, madam, were the whole frame here,I tell you Madame, were the whole Frame here,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.17But tell me, keeper, will my nephew come?But tell me, Keeper, will my Nephew come?
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.39O, tell me when my lips do touch his cheeks,Oh tell me when my Lippes doe touch his Cheekes,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.44And in that ease I'll tell thee my disease.And in that ease, Ile tell thee my Disease.
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.71Believe me, lords, my tender years can tellBeleeue me, Lords, my tender yeeres can tell,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.73God bye, my lord; we came but to tell youGod b'uy my Lord, we came but to tell you
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.vii.59But tell me whom thou seekest.But tell me whom thou seek'st?
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.75How canst thou tell she will deny thy suitHow canst thou tell she will deny thy suite,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.36First let me tell you whom you have condemned:First let me tell you whom you haue condemn'd;
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.v.83I cannot tell; but this I am assured,I cannot tell: but this I am assur'd,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.23What dreamed my lord? Tell me, and I'll requite itWhat dream'd my Lord, tell me, and Ile requite it
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.48I tell thee, Pole, when in the city ToursI tell thee Poole, when in the Citie Tours
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.163I'll tell thee, Suffolk, why I am unmeet:Ile tell thee, Suffolke, why I am vnmeet.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.178What meanest thou, Suffolk? Tell me, what are these?What mean'st thou, Suffolke? tell me, what are these?
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iv.1Come, my masters, the Duchess, I tell you, expectsCome my Masters, the Duchesse I tell you expects
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iv.63Tell me what fate awaits the Duke of Suffolk?Tell me what fate awaits the Duke of Suffolke?
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.60Come to the King and tell him what miracle.Come to the King, and tell him what Miracle.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.72Good fellow, tell us here the circumstance,Good-fellow, tell vs here the circumstance,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.86Tell me, good fellow, camest thou here by chance,Tell me, good-fellow, / Cam'st thou here by Chance,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.116Tell me, sirrah, what's my name?Tell me Sirrha, what's my Name?
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.144To tell my love unto his dumb deaf trunk,To tell my loue vnto his dumbe deafe trunke,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.279Go, Salisbury, and tell them all from meGoe Salisbury, and tell them all from me,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.377And I am sent to tell his majestyAnd I am sent to tell his Maiestie,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.379Go tell this heavy message to the King.Go tell this heauy Message to the King.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.4I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dressI tell thee, Iacke Cade the Cloathier, meanes to dresse
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.147Go to, sirrah, tell the King from me that for his father'sGo too Sirrah, tell the King from me, that for his Fathers
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.155Fellow kings, I tell you that that Lord Say hath geldedFellow-Kings, I tell you, that that Lord Say hath gelded
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.vii.90Tell me: wherein have I offended most?Tell me: wherein haue I offended most?
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.vii.117wives be as free as heart can wish or tongue can tell.wiues be as free as heart can wish, or tongue can tell.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ix.38Tell him I'll send Duke Edmund to the Tower;Tell him, Ile send Duke Edmund to the Tower,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.70Iden, farewell; and be proud of thy victory. TellIden farewell, and be proud of thy victory: Tell
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.71Tell me, my friend, art thou the man that slew him?Tell me my Friend, art thou the man that slew him?
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.215Foul stigmatic, that's more than thou canst tell.Foule stygmaticke that's more then thou canst tell.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.16Speak thou for me and tell them what I did.Speake thou for me, and tell them what I did.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.135Tell me, may not a king adopt an heir?Tell me, may not a King adopt an Heire?
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.182Come, cousin, let us tell the Queen these news.Come Cousin, let vs tell the Queene these Newes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.39And tell him privily of our intent.And tell him priuily of our intent.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.119To tell thee whence thou camest, of whom derived,To tell thee whence thou cam'st, of whom deriu'd,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.106I come to tell you things sith then befallen.I come to tell you things sith then befalne.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.163Tell our devotion with revengeful arms?Tell our Deuotion with reuengefull Armes?
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.45But, Clifford, tell me, didst thou never hearBut Clifford tell me, did'st thou neuer heare,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.10I'll tell thee what befell me on a dayIle tell thee what befell me on a day,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.79And tell me, then, have you not broke your oaths?And tell me then, haue you not broke your Oathes?
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.26How many children hast thou, widow? Tell me.How many Children hast thou, Widow? tell me.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.36Now tell me, madam, do you love your children?Now tell me, Madame, doe you loue your Children?
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.42I'll tell you how these lands are to be got.Ile tell you how these Lands are to be got.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.69To tell thee plain, I aim to lie with thee.To tell thee plaine, I ayme to lye with thee.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.70To tell you plain, I had rather lie in prison.To tell you plaine, I had rather lye in Prison.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.116Well, jest on, brothers; I can tell you bothWell, ieast on Brothers: I can tell you both,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.19Be plain, Queen Margaret, and tell thy grief;Be plaine, Queene Margaret, and tell thy griefe,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.62To tell the passion of my sovereign's heart;To tell the passion of my Soueraignes Heart;
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.92But for the rest, you tell a pedigreeBut for the rest: you tell a Pedigree
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.113Now, Warwick, tell me even upon thy conscience,Now Warwicke, tell me euen vpon thy conscience
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.120Tell me for truth the measure of his loveTell me for truth, the measure of his Loue
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.208And as for Clarence, as my letters tell me,And as for Clarence, as my Letters tell me,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.223And tell false Edward, thy supposed king,And tell false Edward, thy supposed King,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.227Tell him, in hope he'll prove a widower shortly,Tell him, in hope hee'l proue a widower shortly,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.229Tell him my mourning weeds are laid aside,Tell him, my mourning weeds are layde aside,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.231Tell him from me that he hath done me wrong,Tell him from me, that he hath done me wrong,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.1Now tell me, brother Clarence, what think youNow tell me Brother Clarence, what thinke you
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.8I mind to tell him plainly what I think.I minde to tell him plainly what I thinke.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.25Tell me some reason why the Lady GreyTell me some reason, why the Lady Grey
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.90Tell me their words as near as thou canst guess them.tell me their words, / As neere as thou canst guesse them.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.93‘ Go tell false Edward, thy supposed king,Goe tell false Edward, the supposed King,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.99‘ Tell him, in hope he'll prove a widower shortly,Tell him, in hope hee'le proue a Widower shortly,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.104‘ Tell him,’ quoth she, ‘ my mourning weeds are done,Tell him (quoth she) / My mourning Weedes are done,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.110‘ Tell him from me that he hath done me wrong,Tell him from me, that he hath done me wrong,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.136Tell me if you love Warwick more than me.Tell me, if you loue Warwicke more then me;
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.56I'll follow you, and tell what answerIle follow you, and tell what answer
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.ii.6And tell me who is victor, York or Warwick?And tell me who is Victor, Yorke, or Warwicke?
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.35And thou misshapen Dick, I tell ye allAnd thou mis-shapen Dicke, I tell ye all,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.66.2I cannot tellI cannot tell
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.43.1Where others tell steps with me.Where others tell steps with me.
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.169Tell you the Duke, shall prosper. Bid him strive(Tell you the Duke) shall prosper, bid him striue
Henry VIIIH8 I.iv.66To tell your grace, that, having heard by fameTo tell your Grace: That hauing heard by fame
Henry VIIIH8 I.iv.77.3Pray tell 'em thus much from me:Pray tell 'em thus much from me:
Henry VIIIH8 I.iv.88You are a churchman, or I'll tell you, Cardinal,You are a Churchman, or Ile tell you Cardinall,
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.11I'll tell you in a little. The great DukeIle tell you in a little. The great Duke
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.87And if he speak of Buckingham, pray tell himAnd if he speake of Buckingham; pray tell him,
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.91Longer than I have time to tell his years;Longer then I haue time to tell his yeares;
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.115Yourself pronounce their office. I must tell you,Your selfe pronounce their Office. I must tell you,
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.98Ye tell me what ye wish for both – my ruin.Ye tell me what ye wish for both, my ruine:
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.162The prime man of the state? I pray you tell meThe prime man of the State? I pray you tell me,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.270If I loved many words, lord, I should tell youIf I lou'd many words, Lord, I should tell you,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.24That I can tell you too. The ArchbishopThat I can tell you too. The Archbishop
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.117.1I'll tell ye more.Ile tell ye more.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.5Didst thou not tell me, Griffith, as thou ledst me,Did'st thou not tell me Griffith, as thoulead'st mee,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.9Prithee, good Griffith, tell me how he died.Pre'thee good Griffith, tell me how he dy'de.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.163Out of this world. Tell him in death I blessed him,Out of this world. Tell him in death I blest him
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.29And let me tell you, it will ne'er be well – And let me tell you, it will ne're be well,
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.42Sir – I may tell it you – I think I haveSir (I may tell it you) I thinke I haue
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.94I have news to tell you. Come, come, give me your hand.I haue Newes to tell you. / Come, come, giue me your hand.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.51Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?Tell me good Brutus, Can you see your face?
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.93I cannot tell what you and other menI cannot tell, what you and other men
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.179And he will, after his sour fashion, tell youAnd he will (after his sowre fashion) tell you
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.188Casca will tell us what the matter is.Caska will tell vs what the matter is.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.210I rather tell thee what is to be fearedI rather tell thee what is to be fear'd,
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.213And tell me truly what thou think'st of him.And tell me truely, what thou think'st of him.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.215Ay, Casca, tell us what hath chanced todayI Caska, tell vs what hath chanc'd to day
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.232Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.Tell vs the manner of it, gentle Caska.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.233I can as well be hanged as tell the manner of it; itI can as well bee hang'd as tell the manner of it: It
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.278Nay, an I tell you that, I'll ne'er look you i'th' faceNay, and I tell you that, Ile ne're looke you i'th'face
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.281was Greek to me. I could tell you more news too:was Greeke to me. I could tell you more newes too:
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.139.1Am I not stayed for? Tell me.Am I not stay'd for? tell me.
Julius CaesarJC II.i.207But when I tell him he hates flatterers,But, when I tell him, he hates Flatterers,
Julius CaesarJC II.i.280Within the bond of marriage, tell me, Brutus,Within the Bond of Marriage, tell me Brutus,
Julius CaesarJC II.i.298Tell me your counsels, I will not disclose 'em.Tell me your Counsels, I will not disclose 'em:
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.57Here's Decius Brutus; he shall tell them so.Heere's Decius Brutus, he shall tell them so.
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.62And tell them that I will not come today:And tell them that I will not come to day:
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.64I will not come today. Tell them so, Decius.I will not come to day, tell them so Decius.
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.67To be afeard to tell greybeards the truth?To be afear'd to tell Gray-beards the truth:
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.68Decius, go tell them Caesar will not come.Decius, go tell them, Casar will not come.
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.70Lest I be laughed at when I tell them so.Lest I be laught at when I tell them so.
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.103To our proceeding bids me tell you this,To your proceeding, bids me tell you this:
Julius CaesarJC II.iv.5Ere I can tell thee what thou shouldst do there.Ere I can tell thee what thou should'st do there:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.91Nor to no Roman else. So tell them, Publius.Nor to no Roman else: so tell them Publius.
Julius CaesarJC III.i.140Tell him, so please him come unto this place,Tell him, so please him come vnto this place
Julius CaesarJC III.i.287Post back with speed, and tell him what hath chanced.Post backe with speede, / And tell him what hath chanc'd:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.290Hie hence, and tell him so. Yet stay awhile;Hie hence, and tell him so. Yet stay a-while,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.151I have o'ershot myself to tell you of it.I haue o're-shot my selfe to tell you of it,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.225I tell you that which you yourselves do know,I tell you that, which you your selues do know,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.238Alas, you know not! I must tell you then:Alas you know not, I must tell you then:
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.9Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourselfLet me tell you Cassius, you your selfe
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.186Then like a Roman bear the truth I tell;Then like a Roman, beare the truth I tell,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.281To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi.To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi.
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.22And tell me what thou not'st about the field.And tell me what thou not'st about the Field.
Julius CaesarJC V.iv.16Room, ho! Tell Antony, Brutus is ta'en.Roome hoe: tell Antony, Brutus is tane.
Julius CaesarJC V.iv.17I'll tell the news. Here comes the General.Ile tell thee newes. Heere comes the Generall,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.80Tell him: the crown that he usurps is mine,Tell him the Crowne that hee vsurpes, is myne,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.6Thou dost not tell him what a grief it isThou dost not tell him what a griefe it is,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.10Thou doest not tell him, if he here prevail,Thou doest not tell him if he heere preuaile,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.35Farewell, and tell him that you leave us hereFarewell, and tell him that you leaue vs heare,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.69And tell him that you dare not ride to York.And tell him that you dare not ride to Yorke,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.136Hers more to praise than tell the sea by drops,Hers more to praise then tell the sea by drops,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.193Go, draw the same, I tell thee in what form.Go draw the same I tell thee in what forme.
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.213And tell thyself a king doth dote on thee;And tell thy self a King doth dote on thee,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.217Do this, and tell me when I shall be happy.Do this and tell me when I shall be happie.
King Edward IIIE3 III.i.105Now tell me, Philip, what is thy conceit,Now tell me Phillip, what is their concept,
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.29We cannot tell; 'tis good to fear the worst.We cannot tell, tis good to feare the worst.
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.44These, I can tell ye, and such like surmisesThese I can tell yee and such like surmises,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.5How art thou called? Tell me thy name.How art thou calde, tell me thy name.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.34But tell me, Ned, in all thy warlike courseBut tel me Ned, in all thy warlike course,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.56Exclaim no more; for none of you can tellExclayme no more, for none of you can tell,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.ii.69No, sirrah, tell them, since they did refuseNo sirra, tell them since they did refuse,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.58If he should tell by steps, it kills his heart.If he should tell the steps, it kills his hart:
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.81The Lord forbid! Return and tell the king:The Lord forbid, returne and tell the king,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.84Tell him my colours are as red as his,Tell him my colours are as red as his,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.96Tell him I cannot sit a coward's horse.Tell him I cannot sit a cowards horse,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.100So tell the cap'ring boy, and get thee gone.So tell the capring boy, and get thee gone.
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.122So tell the courtly wanton, and be gone.So tell the courtly wanton, and be gone.
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.25Awake thy craven powers, and tell onAwake thycrauen powers, and tell on
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.42Tell them the ravens, seeing them in arms,Tell them the rauens seeing them in armes,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.123And tell the king this is not all his ill,and tell the king this is not all his ill,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.61I'll smile and tell him that this open scarIle smile and tell him that this open scarre,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.208Tell me what ransom thou requir'st to have.Tell me what ransome thou requirest to haue?
King JohnKJ I.i.120That marry wives. Tell me, how if my brother,That marry wiues: tell me, how if my brother
King JohnKJ I.i.232There's toys abroad. Anon I'll tell thee more.There's toyes abroad, anon Ile tell thee more.
King JohnKJ II.i.263Then tell us, shall your city call us lordThen tell vs, Shall your Citie call vs Lord,
King JohnKJ II.i.543Where is she and her son? Tell me, who knows.Where is she and her sonne, tell me, who knowes?
King JohnKJ III.i.5Be well-advised, tell o'er thy tale again.Be well aduis'd, tell ore thy tale againe.
King JohnKJ III.i.62Tell me, thou fellow, is not France forsworn?Tell me thou fellow, is not France forsworne?
King JohnKJ III.i.152Tell him this tale, and from the mouth of EnglandTell him this tale, and from the mouth of England,
King JohnKJ III.i.159So tell the Pope, all reverence set apartSo tell the Pope, all reuerence set apart
King JohnKJ III.i.225And tell me how you would bestow yourself.And tell me how you would bestow your selfe?
King JohnKJ III.iii.60On yon young boy. I'll tell thee what, my friend,On yon young boy: Ile tell thee what my friend,
King JohnKJ IV.ii.234As bid me tell my tale in express words,As bid me tell my tale in expresse words:
King JohnKJ IV.iii.27Return and tell him so. We know the worst.Returne,and tell him so: we know the worst.
King JohnKJ IV.iii.115There tell the King he may inquire us out.There tel the king, he may inquire vs out.
King JohnKJ IV.iii.120.2Ha! I'll tell thee what.Ha? Ile tell thee what.
King JohnKJ V.ii.91And come ye now to tell me John hath madeAnd come ye now to tell me Iohn hath made
King JohnKJ V.iii.1How goes the day with us? O, tell me, Hubert.How goes the day with vs? oh tell me Hubert.
King JohnKJ V.iii.8Tell him, toward Swinstead, to the abbey there.Tell him toward Swinsted, to the Abbey there.
King JohnKJ V.vi.29A monk, I tell you, a resolved villain,A Monke I tell you, a resolued villaine
King JohnKJ V.vi.39I'll tell thee, Hubert, half my power this night,Ile tell thee Hubert, halfe my power this night
King LearKL I.i.48And here are to be answered. Tell me, my daughters,And heere are to be answer'd. Tell me my daughters
King LearKL I.i.166.1I'll tell thee thou dost evil.Ile tell thee thou dost euill.
King LearKL I.i.208I tell you all her wealth. (To France) For you, great king,I tell you all her wealth. For you great King,
King LearKL I.iv.75tell my daughter I would speak with her.tell my Daughter, I would speake with her.
King LearKL I.iv.132Prithee tell him; so much the rent of hisPrythee tell him, so much the rent of his
King LearKL I.iv.226Who is it that can tell me who I am?Who is it that can tell me who I am?
King LearKL I.iv.293I'll tell thee – (to Gonerill) life and death! I am ashamedIle tell thee: / Life and death, I am asham'd
King LearKL I.iv.342How far your eyes may pierce I cannot tell;How farre your eies may pierce I cannot tell;
King LearKL I.v.16I can tell what I can tell.I can tell what I can tell.
King LearKL I.v.17What canst tell, boy?What can'st tell Boy?
King LearKL I.v.19Thou canst tell why one's nose stands i'the middle on'sthou canst tell why ones nose stands i'th'middle on's
King LearKL I.v.25Canst tell how an oyster makes his shell?Can'st tell how an Oyster makes his shell?
King LearKL I.v.27Nor I neither. But I can tell why a snail has a house.Nor I neither; but I can tell why a Snaile ha's a house.
King LearKL II.ii.5Prithee, if thou lovest me, tell me.Prythee, if thou lou'st me, tell me.
King LearKL II.iv.53daughters as thou canst tell in a year.Daughters, as thou canst tell in a yeare.
King LearKL II.iv.99‘ Fiery ’? The ‘ fiery ’ Duke? Tell the hot Duke that – Fiery? The fiery Duke, tell the hot Duke that----
King LearKL II.iv.111Go tell the Duke and's wife I'd speak with them – Goe tell the Duke, and's wife, Il'd speake with them:
King LearKL II.iv.223Nor tell tales of thee to high-judging Jove.Nor tell tales of thee to high-iudging Ioue,
King LearKL III.i.48And she will tell you who that fellow isAnd she will tell you who that Fellow is
King LearKL III.ii.91When usurers tell their gold i'the field,When Vsurers tell their Gold i'th'Field,
King LearKL III.iv.158Thou sayest the King grows mad; I'll tell thee, friend,Thou sayest the King growes mad, Ile tell thee Friend
King LearKL III.iv.162No father his son dearer. True to tell thee,No Father his Sonne deerern: true to tell thee
King LearKL III.vi.9Prithee, nuncle, tell me whether a madman be aPrythee Nunkle tell me, whether a madman be a
King LearKL IV.ii.97Tell me what more thou knowest.Tell me what more thou know'st.
King LearKL IV.vi.277That of thy death and business I can tell.That of thy death, and businesse, I can tell.
King LearKL V.i.8Tell me but truly – but then speak the truth – Tell me but truly, but then speake the truth,
King LearKL V.iii.12And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laughAnd pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh
King LearKL V.iii.277Mine eyes are not o'the best, I'll tell you straight.Mine eyes are not o'th'best, Ile tell you straight.
King LearKL V.iii.282He's a good fellow, I can tell you that;He's a good fellow, I can tell you that,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.186villainy abroad. This letter will tell you more.villanie abroad, this letter will tell you more.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.53two words, the dancing horse will tell you.two words, the dancing horse will tell you.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.79Tell me precisely of what complexion.Tell me precisely of what complexion?
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.133I will tell thee wonders.I will tell thee wonders.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.17I am less proud to hear you tell my worthI am lesse proud to heare you tell my worth,
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.30Tell him the daughter of the King of France,Tell him, the daughter of the King of France,
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.109But tell me, how was there a costard broken in aBut tell me: How was there a Costard broken in a
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.111I will tell you sensibly.I will tell you sencibly.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.ii.34You two are book-men – can you tell me by your witYou two are book-men: Can you tell by your wit,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.ii.147Sir, tell not me of the father, I do fearSir tell not me of the Father, I do feare
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.39No thought can think, nor tongue of mortal tell!No thought can thinke, nor tongue of mortall tell.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.169Where lies thy grief? O, tell me, good Dumaine.Where lies thy griefe? O tell me good Dumaine;
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.208O, dismiss this audience, and I shall tell you more.O dismisse this audience, and I shall tell you more.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.270'Twere good yours did; for, sir, to tell you plain,'Twere good yours did: for sir to tell you plaine,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.i.96pass; for I must tell thee, it will please his grace, by thepasse, for I must tell thee it will please his Grace (by the
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.i.138Shall I tell you a thing?Shall I tell you a thing?
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.192And many miles, the Princess bids you tellAnd many miles: the Princesse bids you tell,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.194Tell her we measure them by weary steps.Tell her we measure them by weary steps.
MacbethMac I.ii.42I cannot tell.I cannot tell:
MacbethMac I.iii.69Stay, you imperfect speakers! Tell me more!Stay you imperfect Speakers, tell me more:
MacbethMac I.iii.123The instruments of darkness tell us truths;The Instruments of Darknesse tell vs Truths,
MacbethMac III.vi.23Macduff lives in disgrace. Sir, can you tellMacduffe liues in disgrace. Sir, can you tell
MacbethMac IV.i.68.1Tell me, thou unknown powerTell me, thou vnknowne power.
MacbethMac IV.i.84That I may tell pale-hearted fear it lies,That I may tell pale-hearted Feare, it lies;
MacbethMac IV.i.100Throbs to know one thing: tell me, if your artThrobs to know one thing: Tell me, if your Art
MacbethMac IV.i.101Can tell so much, shall Banquo's issue everCan tell so much: Shall Banquo's issue euer
MacbethMac V.i.59so pale. I tell you yet again, Banquo's buried; he cannotso pale: I tell you yet againe Banquo's buried; he cannot
MacbethMac V.vi.54Tell thee Macduff was from his mother's wombTell thee, Macduffe was from his Mothers womb
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.28For I have had such faults; but rather tell me,For I haue had such faults; but rather tell me
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.211Come, tell me true. It shall be the better for you.come, tell me true, it shall be the better for you.
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.225There is pretty orders beginning, I can tell you.There is pretty orders beginning I can tell you:
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.2.1I'll tell him of you.I'le tell him of you.
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.8Did not I tell thee, yea? Hadst thou not order?Did not I tell thee yea? hadst thou not order?
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.69No, I would tell what 'twere to be a judge,No: I would tell what 'twere to be a Iudge,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.143And you tell me that he shall die for't.And you tell me that he shall die for't.
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.153Or with an outstretched throat I'll tell the worldOr with an out-stretcht throate Ile tell the world aloud
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.171To whom should I complain? Did I tell this,To whom should I complaine? Did I tell this,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.186I'll tell him yet of Angelo's request,Ile tell him yet of Angelo's request,
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.83I know none. Can you tell me of any?I know none: can you tell me of any?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.159But no more of this. Canst thou tell if Claudio dieBut no more of this: Canst thou tell if Claudio die
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.242severe that he hath forced me to tell him he is indeedseuere, that he hath forc'd me to tell him, hee is indeede
Measure for MeasureMM IV.i.16I pray you tell me, hath anybody inquired for me hereI pray you tell me, hath any body enquir'd for mee here
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.29Tell him he must awake, and that quickly too.Tell him he must awake, / And that quickly too.
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.162Nay, tarry, I'll go along with thee. I can tell theeNay tarrie, Ile go along with thee, / I can tel thee
Measure for MeasureMM IV.v.7And tell him where I stay. Give the like noticeAnd tell him where I stay: giue the like notice
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.323Is this the man that you did tell us of?Is this the man you did tell vs of?
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.39But tell not me; I know AntonioBut tell not me, I know Anthonio
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.86By being peevish? I tell thee what, Antonio,By being peeuish? I tell thee what Anthonio,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.100I'll tell thee more of this another time.Ile tell thee more of this another time.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.119Well, tell me now what lady is the sameWell: tel me now, what Lady is the same
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.121That you today promised to tell me of?That you to day promis'd to tel me of?
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.93I cannot tell, I make it breed as fast.I cannot tell, I make it breede as fast,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.159The thoughts of others! Pray you tell me this:The thoughts of others: Praie you tell me this,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.i.8I tell thee, lady, this aspect of mineI tell thee Ladie this aspect of mine
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.41you tell me whether one Launcelot that dwells with him,you tell me whether one Launcelet that dwels with him,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.65But I pray you tell me, is my boy, God rest his soul,but I praie you tell me, is my boy God rest his soule
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.71own child. Well, old man, I will tell you news of yourowne childe. Well, old man, I will tell you newes of your
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.99you may tell every finger I have with my ribs. Father, IYou may tell euerie finger I haue with my ribs: Father I
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.19Hold here, take this. Tell gentle JessicaHold here, take this, tell gentle Iessica
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.29I must needs tell thee all. She hath directedI must needes tell thee all, she hath directed
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.v.8Your worship was wont to tell me I could doYour worship was wont to tell me / I could doe
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.26Who are you? Tell me for more certainty,Who are you? tell me for more certainty,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.viii.33You were best to tell Antonio what you hear,Yo were best to tell Anthonio what you heare.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ix.35Tell me once more what title thou dost bear.Tell me once more, what title thou doost beare;
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.38tell us, do you hear whether Antonio have had any losstell vs, doe you heare whether Anthonio haue had anie losse
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.63Tell me where is fancy bred,Tell me where is fancie bred,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.233I pray you tell me how my good friend doth.I pray you tell me how my good friend doth.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iii.1Gaoler, look to him. Tell not me of mercy.Iaylor, looke to him, tell not me of mercy,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.69Like a fine bragging youth, and tell quaint lies,Like a fine bragging youth: and tell quaint lyes
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.74And twenty of these puny lies I'll tell,And twentie of these punie lies Ile tell,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.81But come, I'll tell thee all my whole deviceBut come, Ile tell thee all my whole deuice
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.v.24I'll tell my husband, Launcelot, what you say.Ile tell my husband Lancelet what you say,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.180On what compulsion must I? Tell me that.On what compulsion must I? Tell me that.
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.271Tell her the process of Antonio's end,Tell her the processe of Anthonio's end:
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.ii.10And so I pray you tell him. Furthermore,And so I pray you tell him: furthermore,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.46Tell him there's a post come from myTel him ther's a Post come from my
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.63Shall I tell you a lie? I do despise a liar as I doShall I tell you a lye? I doe despise a lyer, as I doe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.72peradventures shall tell you another tale, if matters growperaduentures shall tell you another tale, if matters grow
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.126Where's Simple, my man? Can you tell,Where's Simple my man? can you tell,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.35My honest lads, I will tell you what I am about.My honest Lads, I will tell you what I am about.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.32worse fortune. Tell Master Parson Evans I will doworse fortune: Tell Master Parson Euans, I will doe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.100early and down late. But notwithstanding – to tell youearly, and down late: but notwithstanding, (to tell you
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.136tell you that by the way, I praise heaven for it.tell you that by the way, I praise heauen for it.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.154will tell your worship more of the wart the next timewill tell your Worship more of the Wart, the next time
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.185Tell him, cavaliero justice; tell him, bully rook.Tell him Caueleiro-Iustice: tell him Bully-Rooke.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.194tell you what our sport shall be.tell you what our sport shall be.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.198sack to give me recourse to him and tell him my name issacke, to giue me recourse to him, and tell him my name is
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.94tell you in your ear, she's as fartuous a civil modesttell you in your eare, shee's as fartuous a ciuill modest
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.95wife, and one, I tell you, that will not miss you morningwife, and one (I tell you) that will not misse you morning
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.97the other. And she bade me tell your worship that herthe other: and shee bade me tell your worship, that her
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.105But I pray thee tell me this: has Ford's wifeBut I pray thee tell me this: has Fords wife,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.171I will tell you, sir, if you will give me the hearing.I will tell you sir, if you will giue mee the hearing.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.249shall want none. I shall be with her, I may tell you, byshall want none: I shall be with her (I may tell you) by
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.12Take your rapier, Jack. I vill tell you how I vill kill him.take your Rapier, (Iacke) I vill tell you how I vill kill him.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.59lief you would tell me of a mess of porridge.lief you would tell me of a messe of porredge.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.17I cannot tell what the dickens his nameI cannot tell what (the dickens) his name
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.59Quickly tell me so mush.Quickly tell me so mush.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.28liberty if I tell you of it; for he swears he'll turnliberty, if I tell you of it: for he sweares he'll turne
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.33Do so. (To Robin) Go tell thy master IDo so: go tell thy Master, I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.79Nay, I must tell you, so you do, or elseNay, I must tell you, so you doe; / Or else
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.108a one. I come before to tell you. If you know yourselfa one, I come before to tell you: If you know your selfe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.151Gentlemen, I have dreamed tonight. I'll tell you myGentlemen, I haue dream'd to night, Ile tell you my
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.39tell you good jests of him. Pray you, uncle, tell Mistresstel you good iests of him: pray you Vncle, tel Mist.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.63dole. They can tell you how things go better than I can.dole, they can tell you how things go, better then I can:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.45Well, I will visit her. Tell her so, and bid herWell, I will visit her, tell her so: and bidde her
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.48I will tell her.I will tell her.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.201Shall we tell our husbands how we haveShall we tell our husbands how wee haue
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.iv.59.2And till he tell the truth,And till he tell the truth,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.iv.75He'll tell me all his purpose. Sure, he'll come.Hee'l tell me all his purpose: sure hee'l come.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.73tell you for good will, look you. You are wise, and full oftell you for good will (looke you) you are wise, and full of
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.79I cannot tell vat is dat. But it is tell-a me dat youI cannot tell vat is dat: but it is tell-a-me, dat you
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.82tell you for good will. Adieu.tell you for good will: adieu.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.18Brook, that ever governed frenzy. I will tell you: heBroome) that euer gouern'd Frensie. I will tell you, he
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.22am in haste. Go along with me. I'll tell you all, Masteram in hast, go along with mee, Ile tell you all (Master
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.25Follow me. I'll tell you strange things of this knaveFollow mee, Ile tell you strange things of this knaue
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.170my wife that now laughs at thee. Tell her Master Slendermy wife, that now laughes at thee: Tell her Mr Slender
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.187What need you tell me that? I think so, when IWhat neede you tell me that? I think so, when I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.190Why, this is your own folly. Did not I tell you howWhy this is your owne folly, / Did not I tell you how
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.246I will go tell him of fair Hermia's flight.I will goe tell him of faire Hermias flight:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.201Tell you I do not nor I cannot love you?Tell you I doe not, nor I cannot loue you?
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.19tell them that I, Pyramus, am not Pyramus, but Bottomtell them, that I Piramus am not Piramus, but Bottome
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.31Therefore another prologue must tell he is not aTherefore another Prologue must tell he is not a
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.41let him name his name, and tell them plainly he is Snuglet / him name his name, and tell him plainly hee is Snug
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.68O, once tell true – tell true, even for my sake.Oh, once tell true, euen for my sake,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.76Nor is he dead, for aught that I can tell.Nor is he dead for ought that I can tell.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.77I pray thee, tell me then that he is well.I pray thee tell me then that he is well.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.348Did not you tell me I should know the manDid not you tell me, I should know the man,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.99Tell me how it came this nightTell me how it came this night,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.206I was – there is no man can tell what. MethoughtI was, there is no man can tell what. Me-thought
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.27me not what; for if I tell you, I am not true Athenian. – Inot what. For if I tell you, I am no true Athenian. I
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.28will tell you everything, right as it fell out!will tell you euery thing as it fell out.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.30Not a word of me! All that I will tell you is – thatNot a word of me: all that I will tell you, is, that
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.250All that I have to say is to tell you that theAll that I haue to say, is to tell you, that the
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.16expectation than you must expect of me to tell you how.expectation, then you must expect of me to tell you how.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.140hath invited you all. I tell him we shall stay here at thehath inuited you all, I tell him we shall stay here, at the
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.166Thou thinkest I am in sport; I pray thee tell meThou think'st I am in sport, I pray thee tell me
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.172to tell us Cupid is a good hare-finder, and Vulcan a rareto tell vs Cupid is a good Hare-finder, and Vulcan a rare
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.192I would your grace would constrain me to tell.I would your Grace would constraine mee to tell.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.255commend me to him and tell him I will not failcommend me to him, and tell him I will not faile
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.301And tell fair Hero I am Claudio,And tell faire Hero I am Claudio,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.3He is very busy about it. But, brother, I can tellHe is very busie about it, but brother, I can tell
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.21this be true. Go you and tell her of it.this bee true: goe you and tell her of it:
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.63tell him there is measure in everything and so dancetell him there is measure in euery thing, & so dance
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.103To tell you true, I counterfeit him.To tell you true, I counterfet him.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.111Will you not tell me who told you so?Will you not tell me who told you so?
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.113Nor will you not tell me who you are?Nor will you not tell me who you are?
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.130When I know the gentleman, I'll tell him whatWhen I know the Gentleman, Ile tell him what
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.322She cannot endure to hear tell of a husband.Shee cannot indure to heare tell of a husband.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.358only love-gods. Go in with me, and I will tell you myonely loue-gods, goe in with me, and I will tell you my
Much Ado About NothingMA II.ii.20you to the Prince your brother; spare not to tell himyou to the Prince your brother, spare not to tell him,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.ii.31Pedro and the Count Claudio alone. Tell them thatPedro and the Count Claudio alone, tell them that
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.22these eyes? I cannot tell; I think not. I will not bethese eyes? I cannot tell, I thinke not: I will not bee
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.101By my troth, my lord, I cannot tell what toBy my troth my Lord, I cannot tell what to
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.113heard my daughter tell you how.heard my daughter tell you how.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.170myself. I pray you, tell Benedick of it, and hear whatmy selfe: I pray you tell Benedicke of it, and heare what
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.197seek Benedick, and tell him of her love?see Benedicke, and tell him of her loue.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.198Never tell him, my lord; let her wear it out withNeuer tell him, my Lord, let her weare it out with
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.4Whisper her ear, and tell her I and UrsulaWhisper her eare, and tell her I and Vrsula,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.39And did they bid you tell her of it, madam?And did they bid you tell her of it, Madam?
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.74But who dare tell her so? If I should speak,But who dare tell her so? if I should speake,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.81Yet tell her of it; hear what she will say.Yet tell her of it, heare what shee will say.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.91I came hither to tell you; and, circumstancesI came hither to tell you, and circumstances
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.143good night – I tell this tale vilely – I should first tell thee howgood night: I tell this tale vildly. I should first tell thee how
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.42My soul doth tell me Hero is belied,My soule doth tell me, Hero is belied,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.154I'll tell thee how Beatrice praised thy wit theIle tell thee how Beatrice prais'd thy wit the
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.52sense, so forcible is thy wit. But I must tell thee plainly,sence, so forcible is thy wit, but I must tell thee plainely,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.55And I pray thee now, tell me for which of my bad partsand I pray thee now tell me, for which of my bad parts
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.79myself will bear witness, is praiseworthy. And now tellmy selfe will beare witnesse is praise worthie, and now tell
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.1Did I not tell you she was innocent?Did I not tell you she was innocent?
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.69I'll tell you largely of fair Hero's death.Ile tell you largely of faire Heroes death:
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.99I'll tell thee what, Prince; a college of wit-crackersIle tell thee what Prince: a Colledge of witte-crackers
OthelloOth I.i.1Tush, never tell me! I take it much unkindlyNEuer tell me, I take it much vnkindly
OthelloOth I.i.116I am one, sir, that comes to tell you, your daughterI am one Sir, that comes to tell you, your Daughter
OthelloOth I.i.130But if you know not this, my manners tell meBut if you know not this, my Manners tell me,
OthelloOth I.iii.122And till she come, as truly as to heavenAnd tell she come, as truely as to heauen,
OthelloOth I.iii.132To th' very moment that he bade me tell it:Toth'very moment that he bad me tell it.
OthelloOth I.iii.164I should but teach him how to tell my story,I should but teach him how to tell my Story,
OthelloOth II.i.88What tidings can you tell me of my lord?What tydings can you tell of my Lord?
OthelloOth II.i.212guard. First, I must tell thee this: Desdemona is directlyFirst, I must tell thee this: Desdemona, is directly
OthelloOth II.iii.294I will ask him for my place again; he shall tell meI will aske him for my Place againe, he shall tell me,
OthelloOth II.iii.305I'll tell you what you shall do. Our General's wife isI tell you what you shall do: Our General's Wife, is
OthelloOth III.i.25General's wife be stirring, tell her there's one CassioGenerall be stirring, tell her, there's one Cassio
OthelloOth III.iii.68Tell me, Othello. I wonder in my soulTell me Othello. I wonder in my Soule
OthelloOth III.iii.430She may be honest yet. Tell me but this:She may be honest yet: Tell me but this,
OthelloOth III.iv.8To tell you where he lodges is to tell you where ITo tell you where he lodges, is to tel you where I
OthelloOth III.iv.18Seek him; bid him come hither; tell him ISeeke him, bidde him come hither: tell him, I
OthelloOth IV.i.84For I will make him tell the tale anew,For I will make him tell the Tale anew;
OthelloOth IV.i.114(aside) Now he importunes him to tell it o'er.Now he importunes him / To tell it o're:
OthelloOth IV.ii.110I cannot tell: those that do teach young babesI cannot tell: those that do teach yong Babes
OthelloOth IV.ii.196I tell you, 'tis not very well. I will make myselfI tell you, 'tis not very well: I will make my selfe
OthelloOth IV.iii.58Dost thou in conscience think – tell me, Emilia –Do'st thou in conscience thinke (tell me Amilia)
OthelloOth V.i.127And tell my lord and lady what hath happed.And tell my Lord and Lady, what hath happ'd:
OthelloOth V.ii.177But did you ever tell him she was false?But did you euer tell him, / She was false?
PericlesPer Chorus.I.20I tell you what mine authors say.I tell you what mine Authors saye:
PericlesPer I.i.37Tell thee with speechless tongues and semblance paleTell thee with speachlesse tongues, and semblance pale,
PericlesPer I.i.79But I must tell you now my thoughts revolt;But I must tell you, now my thoughts reuolt,
PericlesPer I.i.94'Twould braid yourself too near for me to tell it.T'would brayde your selfe too neare for me to tell it:
PericlesPer I.i.102Copped hills towards heaven, to tell the earth is throngedCopt hilles towards heauen, to tell the earth is throng'd
PericlesPer I.i.147Nor tell the world Antiochus doth sinNor tell the world Antiochus doth sinne
PericlesPer I.iv.79Go tell their general we attend him here,Goe tell their Generall wee attend him heere,
PericlesPer II.i.49These fishers tell the infirmities of men,These Fishers tell the infirmities of men,
PericlesPer II.i.99Why, I'll tell you. This is calledWhy Ile tell you, this I cald
PericlesPer II.i.108I'll tell you, he hath a fair daughter, and tomorrowIle tell you, / He hath a faire Daughter, and to morrow
PericlesPer II.iii.73And furthermore tell him we desire to know of himAnd furthermore tell him, we desire to know of him
PericlesPer III.ii.10.1And tell me how it works.And tell me how it workes.
PericlesPer IV.ii.91And I prithee tell me, how dost thou find theAnd I prethee tell me, how dost thou find the
PericlesPer IV.vi.153Prithee tell me one thing first.Prithee tell mee one thing first.
PericlesPer V.i.118If I should tell my history, it would seemIf I should tell my hystorie, it would seeme
PericlesPer V.i.134.2Tell thy story.Tell thy storie,
PericlesPer V.i.184Most wise in general. Tell me, if thou canst,Most wise in generall, tell me if thou canst,
PericlesPer V.i.188.2She never would tellShe neuer would tell
PericlesPer V.i.201What was thy mother's name? Tell me but that,What was thy mothers name? tell me, but that
PericlesPer V.i.205I am Pericles of Tyre; but tell me nowI am Pericles of Tyre, but tell mee now
PericlesPer V.i.217By savage Cleon. She shall tell thee all;by sauage Cleon, she shall tell thee all,
PericlesPer V.i.225Tell Helicanus, my Marina, tell himtell, Hellicanus my Marina, / Tell him
PericlesPer V.i.248Awake, and tell thy dream.awake and tell thy dreame.
PericlesPer V.i.254Turn our blown sails. Eftsoons I'll tell thee why.turne our blowne sayles, / Eftsoones Ile tell thee why,
Richard IIR2 I.i.8Tell me, moreover, hast thou sounded himTell me moreouer, hast thou sounded him,
Richard IIR2 II.i.212What will ensue hereof there's none can tell;What will ensue heereof, there's none can tell.
Richard IIR2 II.ii.93My lord, I had forgot to tell your lordship – My Lord, I had forgot / To tell your Lordship,
Richard IIR2 II.iii.139My lords of England, let me tell you this:My Lords of England, let me tell you this,
Richard IIR2 III.i.38Tell her I send to her my kind commends.Tell her I send to her my kind commends;
Richard IIR2 III.ii.120And all goes worse than I have power to tell.And all goes worse then I haue power to tell.
Richard IIR2 III.ii.156And tell sad stories of the death of kings – And tell sad stories of the death of Kings:
Richard IIR2 III.iii.91Tell Bolingbroke – for yon methinks he stands – Tell Bullingbrooke, for yond me thinkes he is,
Richard IIR2 III.iv.10Madam, we'll tell tales.Madame, wee'le tell Tales.
Richard IIR2 III.iv.71That tell black tidings.That tell blacke tydings.
Richard IIR2 V.i.41With good old folks, and let them tell thee talesWith good old folkes, and let them tell thee Tales
Richard IIR2 V.i.44Tell thou the lamentable tale of me,Tell thou the lamentable fall of me,
Richard IIR2 V.ii.1My lord, you told me you would tell the rest,My Lord, you told me you would tell the rest,
Richard IIR2 V.iii.1Can no man tell me of my unthrifty son?Can no man tell of my vnthriftie Sonne?
Richard IIR2 V.iii.46Tell us how near is danger,Tell vs how neere is danger,
Richard IIR2 V.v.81Rode he on Barbary? Tell me, gentle friend,Rode he on Barbary? Tell me gentle Friend,
Richard IIIR3 I.i.78I'll tell you what, I think it is our way,Ile tell you what, I thinke it is our way,
Richard IIIR3 I.i.98Naught to do with Mistress Shore? I tell thee, fellow,Naught to do with Mistris Shore?
Richard IIIR3 I.i.99He that doth naught with her, excepting one,I tell thee Fellow, he that doth naught with her / (Excepting one)
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.73O wonderful, when devils tell the truth!O wonderfull, when diuels tell the truth!
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.125If I thought that, I tell thee, homicide,If I thought that, I tell thee Homicide,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.69I cannot tell; the world is grown so badI cannot tell, the world is growne so bad,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.113Tell him, and spare not. Look what I have said
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.329And tell them 'tis the Queen and her alliesAnd tell them 'tis the Queene, and her Allies,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.334Tell them that God bids us do good for evil;Tell them that God bids vs do good for euill:
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.8What was your dream, my lord? I pray you tell me.What was your dream my Lord, I pray you tel me
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.65I am afraid, methinks, to hear you tell it.I am affraid (me thinkes) to heare you tell it.
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.117and tell him so.and tell him so.
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.178You scarcely have the hearts to tell me so,You scarsely haue the hearts to tell me so,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.238Tell him, when that our princely father YorkTell him, when that our Princely Father Yorke,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.280Take thou the fee and tell him what I say,Take thou the Fee, and tell him what I say,
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.1Good grandam, tell us, is our father dead?Good Grandam tell vs, is our Father dead?
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.34If 'twere not she, I cannot tell who told me.If 'twere not she, I cannot tell who told me.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.23To tell us whether they will come or no!To tell vs, whether they will come, or no.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.89I'll tell you what, my cousin Buckingham – Ile tell you what, my Cousin Buckingham.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.175Encourage him, and tell him all our reasons;Encourage him, and tell him all our reasons:
Richard IIIR3 III.i.181Commend me to Lord William. Tell him, Catesby,Commend me to Lord William: tell him Catesby,
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.25Tell him his fears are shallow, without instance;Tell him his Feares are shallow, without instance.
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.34I'll go, my lord, and tell him what you say.Ile goe, my Lord, and tell him what you say.
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.97I tell thee, man, 'tis better with me nowI tell thee man, 'tis better with me now,
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.101But now I tell thee – keep it to thyself – But now I tell thee (keepe it to thy selfe)
Richard IIIR3 III.iii.1Sir Richard Ratcliffe, let me tell thee this:Sir Richard Ratcliffe, let me tell thee this,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.59I pray you all, tell me what they deserveI pray you all, tell me what they deserue,
Richard IIIR3 III.v.36We live to tell it, that the subtle traitorWe liue to tell it, that the subtill Traytor
Richard IIIR3 III.v.75Tell them how Edward put to death a citizenTell them, how Edward put to death a Citizen,
Richard IIIR3 III.v.85Tell them, when that my mother went with childTell them, when that my Mother went with Child
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.31Then he was urged to tell my tale again:Then he was vrg'd to tell my Tale againe:
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.65Tell him, myself, the Mayor and Aldermen,Tell him, my selfe, the Maior and Aldermen,
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.90And so once more return and tell his grace.And so once more returne, and tell his Grace.
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.140I cannot tell if to depart in silenceI cannot tell, if to depart in silence,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iii.32When thou shalt tell the process of their death.When thou shalt tell the processe of their death.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.39Tell over your woes again by viewing mine.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.144Tell me, thou villain-slave, where are my children?Tell me thou Villaine-slaue, where are my Children?
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.247Tell me, what state, what dignity, what honourTell me, what State, what Dignity, what Honor,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.281Tell her thou mad'st away her uncle Clarence,Tell her, thou mad'st away her Vnckle Clarence,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.345Tell her the King, that may command, entreats.Tell her, the King that may command, intreats.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.359Then plainly to tell her my loving tale.Then plainly to her, tell my louing tale.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.447First, mighty liege, tell me your highness' pleasure,First, mighty Liege, tell me your Highnesse pleasure,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.461When thou mayst tell thy tale a nearest way?When thou mayest tell thy Tale the neerest way?
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.473Then tell me, what makes he upon the seas?Then tell me, what makes he vpon the Seas?
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.509The news I have to tell your majestyThe newes I haue to tell your Maiestie,
Richard IIIR3 IV.v.1Sir Christopher, tell Richmond this from me:Sir Christopher, tell Richmond this from me,
Richard IIIR3 IV.v.9But, tell me, where is princely Richmond now?But tell me, where is Princely Richmond now?
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.83Tell me, how fares our loving mother?Tell me, how fares our Noble Mother?
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.277Tell the clock there. Give me a calendar.Tell the clocke there. / Giue me a Kalender:
Richard IIIR3 V.v.9But tell me, is young George Stanley living?But tell me, is yong George Stanley liuing?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.174Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.Yet tell me not, for I haue heard it all:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.199Tell me in sadness, who is that you love.Tell me in sadnesse, who is that you loue?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.200.1What, shall I groan and tell thee?What shall I grone and tell thee?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.201But sadly tell me who.but sadly tell me who.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.224Do I live dead that live to tell it now.Do I liue dead, that liue to tell it now.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.77Now I'll tell you without asking. My master isNow Ile tell you without asking. My maister is
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.12Faith, I can tell her age unto an hour.Faith I can tell her age vnto an houre.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.65I came to talk of. Tell me, daughter Juliet,I came to talke of, tell me daughter Iuliet,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.23That I have worn a visor and could tellThat I haue worne a Visor, and could tell
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.40.2Will you tell me that?Will you tell me that?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.116I tell you, he that can lay hold of herI tell you, he that can lay hold of her,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.54I know not how to tell thee who I am.I know not how to tell thee who I am:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.62How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?How cam'st thou hither. / Tell me, and wherefore?
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.193His help to crave and my dear hap to tell.His helpe to craue, and my deare hap to tell.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.44I'll tell thee ere thou ask it me again.Ile tell thee ere thou aske it me agen:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.59I'll tell thee as we pass. But this I pray,Ile tell thee as we passe, but this I pray,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.19More than Prince of Cats, I can tell you. O,More then Prince of Cats. Oh
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.109'Tis no less, I tell ye, for the bawdy hand of'Tis no lesse I tell you: for the bawdy hand of
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.115quoth 'a? Gentlemen, can any of you tell me where Iquatha: Gentlemen, can any of you tel me where I
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.117I can tell you. But young Romeo will be olderI can tell you: but young Romeo will be older
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.162first let me tell ye, if ye should lead her in a fool's paradise,first let me tell ye, if ye should leade her in a fooles paradise,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.170Good heart, and i'faith I will tell her as much.Good heart, and yfaith I will tell her as much:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.172What wilt thou tell her, Nurse? Thou dost notWhat wilt thou tell her Nurse? thou doest not
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.174I will tell her, sir, that you do protest, which, as II will tell her sir, that you do protest, which as I
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.199toad, as see him. I anger her sometimes, and tell her thatToade as see him: I anger her sometimes, and tell her that
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.22Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily.Though newes, be sad, yet tell them merrily.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.54Sweet, sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me, what says my love?Sweet sweet, sweet Nurse, tell me what saies my Loue?
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.82O holy Friar, O, tell me, holy Friar,O holy Frier, O tell me holy Frier,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.105Murdered her kinsman. O, tell me, Friar, tell me,Murdred her kinsman. Oh tell me Frier, tell me,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.107Doth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sackDoth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sacke
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.161My lord, I'll tell my lady you will come.My Lord Ile tell my Lady you will come.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iv.20A' Thursday let it be. A' Thursday, tell her,A Thursday let it be: a Thursday tell her,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.104But now I'll tell thee joyful tidings, girl.But now Ile tell thee ioyfull tidings Gyrle.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.120I pray you tell my lord and father, madam,I pray you tell my Lord and Father Madam,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.124Here comes your father. Tell him so yourself,Here comes your Father, tell him so your selfe,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.161I tell thee what – get thee to church a' ThursdayI tell thee what, get thee to Church a Thursday,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.232Go in; and tell my lady I am gone,Go in, and tell my Lady I am gone,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.50Tell me not, Friar, that thou hearest of this,Tell me not Frier that thou hearest of this,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.51Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.Vnlesse thou tell me how I may preuent it:
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.121Give me, give me! O tell not me of fear!Giue me, giue me, O tell not me ofcare.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.ii.23Send for the County. Go tell him of this.Send for the Countie, goe tell him of this,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.21And presently took post to tell it you.And presently tooke Poste to tell it you:
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.124Bliss be upon you! Tell me, good my friend,Blisse be vpon you. Tell me good my Friend
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.177Go, tell the Prince. Run to the Capulets.Go tell the Prince, runne to the Capulets,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.59Another tell him of his hounds and horse,Another tell him of his Hounds and Horse,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.96And so offend him, for I tell you, sirs,And so offend him: for I tell you sirs,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.107Tell him from me – as he will win my love –Tell him from me (as he will win my loue)
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.21Tell me thy mind, for I have Pisa leftTell me thy minde, for I haue Pisa left,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.129I cannot tell. But I had as lief take her dowryI cannot tell: but I had as lief take her dowrie
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.143I pray, sir, tell me, is it possibleI pray sir tel me, is it possible
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.188.1Tell me thine first.Tell me thine first.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.47And tell me now, sweet friend, what happy galeAnd tell me now (sweet friend) what happie gale
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.93Tell me her father's name and 'tis enough.Tell me her fathers name, and 'tis enough:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.111I'll tell you what, sir, an she stand him but a little, heIle tell you what sir, and she stand him but a litle, he
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.178I'll tell you news indifferent good for either.Ile tel you newes indifferent good for either.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.205And do you tell me of a woman's tongue,And do you tell me of a womans tongue?
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.217Tell me, I beseech you, which is the readiest wayTell me I beseech you, which is the readiest way
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.8Of all thy suitors here I charge thee tellOf all thy sutors heere I charge tel
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.109To my daughters, and tell them bothTo my daughters, and tell them both
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.119Then tell me, if I get your daughter's love,Then tell me, if I get your daughters loue,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.130Why, that is nothing. For I tell you, father,Why that is nothing: for I tell you father,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.149I did but tell her she mistook her frets,I did but tell her she mistooke her frets,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.170Say that she rail, why then I'll tell her plainSay that she raile, why then Ile tell her plaine,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.299I tell you 'tis incredible to believeI tell you 'tis incredible to beleeue
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.101And tells us what occasion of importAnd tell vs what occasion of import
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.104Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to hear – Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to heare,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.157I'll tell you, Sir Lucentio – when the priestIle tell you sir Lucentio; when the Priest
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.29I prithee, good Grumio, tell me, how goes theI prethee good Grumio, tell me, how goes the
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.64Tell thou the tale. But hadst thou not crossedTell thou the tale: but hadst thou not crost
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.156I tell thee, Kate, 'twas burnt and dried away,I tell thee Kate, 'twas burnt and dried away,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.3I tell you, sir, she bears me fair in hand.I tel you sir, she beares me faire in hand.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.11Quick proceeders, marry! Now tell me, I pray,Quicke proceeders marry, now tel me I pray,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.15I tell thee, Licio, this is wonderful.I tel thee Lisio this is wonderfull.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.93First tell me, have you ever been at Pisa?First tell me, haue you euer beene at Pisa?
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.22I cannot tell, I fear 'tis choleric.I cannot tell, I feare 'tis chollericke.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.77My tongue will tell the anger of my heart,My tongue will tell the anger of my heart,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.113I tell thee, I, that thou hast marred her gown.I tell thee I, that thou hast marr'd her gowne.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.64And, if you will, tell what hath happened – And if you will tell what hath hapned,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.88I cannot tell, except they are busied about aI cannot tell, expect they are busied about a
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.28Tell me, sweet Kate, and tell me truly too,Tell me sweete Kate, and tell me truely too,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.24I pray you tell Signor Lucentio that his father isI pray you tell signior Lucentio that his Father is
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.80my son, my son! Tell me, thou villain, where is my sonmy sonne, my sonne: tell me thou villaine, where is my son
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.110Why, tell me, is not this my Cambio?Why, tell me is not this my Cambio?
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.27I pray you tell me what you meant by that.I praie you tell me what you meant by that.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.129Katherine, I charge thee, tell these headstrong womenKatherine I charge thee tell these head-strong women,
The TempestTem I.ii.14No more amazement. Tell your piteous heartNo more amazement: Tell your pitteous heart
The TempestTem I.ii.34Begun to tell me what I am, but stopped,Begun to tell me what I am, but stopt
The TempestTem I.ii.43Of any thing the image tell me, thatOf any thing the Image, tell me, that
The TempestTem I.ii.117Mark his condition and th' event; then tell meMarke his condition, and th' euent, then tell me
The TempestTem I.ii.260.2Thou hast. Where was she born? Speak! Tell me!Thou hast: where was she born? speak: tell me:
The TempestTem II.i.17One: tell.One: Tell.
The TempestTem II.i.248.3Then, tell me,Then tell me,
The TempestTem II.i.294They'll tell the clock to any business thatThey'l tell the clocke, to any businesse that
The TempestTem II.ii.83mouth. This will shake your shaking, I can tell you, andmouth; this will shake your shaking, I can tell you, and
The TempestTem II.ii.84that soundly. (He gives Caliban wine) You cannot tellthat soundly: you cannot tell
The TempestTem III.ii.1Tell not me! When the butt is out we willTell not me, when the But is out we will
The TempestTem III.ii.27much sack as I today? Wilt thou tell a monstrous lie,much Sacke as I to day? wilt thou tell a monstrous lie,
The TempestTem III.ii.116This will I tell my master.This will I tell my Master.
The TempestTem IV.i.86.2Tell me, heavenly bow,Tell me heauenly Bowe,
The TempestTem V.i.129.1I will tell no tales.I will tell no tales.
The TempestTem V.i.230I'd strive to tell you. We were dead of sleepI'ld striue to tell you: we were dead of sleepe,
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.158Else I should tell him well, i'faith I should,Else I should tell him well, yfaith I should;
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.217friend's affection with mine own. I'll tell you true, I'llFriends affection with mine owne: Ile tell you true, Ile
Timon of AthensTim II.i.19Plays in the right hand, thus. But tell himPlayes in the right hand, thus: but tell him,
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.159.2You tell me true.You tell me true.
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.4are but strangers to him. But I can tell you one thing,are but strangers to him. But I can tell you one thing
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.16I tell you, denied, my lord.I tell you, deny'de my Lord.
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.56tell him this from me, I count it one of my greatesttell him this from me, I count it one of my greatest
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.40I need not tell him that; he knows. You areI need not tell him that, he knowes you are
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.95Tell out my blood.Tell out my blood.
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.60I'll tell you more anon. Here's a noble feastIle tell you more anon. Here's a Noble feast
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.291Tell them there I have gold. Look, so I have.Tell them there I haue Gold, looke, so I haue.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.509Upon their first lord's neck. But tell me true – Vpon their first Lords necke. But tell me true,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.20I must serve him so too, tell him of an intent that'sI must serue him so too; / Tell him of an intent that's
Timon of AthensTim V.i.173Then let him know – and tell him Timon speaks itThen let him know, and tell him Timon speakes it,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.175I cannot choose but tell him that I care not,I cannot choose but tell him that I care not,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.196And tell them that to ease them of their griefs,And tell them, that to ease them of their greefes,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.205And shortly must I fell it. Tell my friends,And shortly must I fell it. Tell my Friends,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.206Tell Athens, in the sequence of degreeTell Athens, in the sequence of degree,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.205Proud and ambitious tribune, canst thou tell?Proud and ambitious Tribune can'st thou tell?
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.246Tell me, Andronicus, doth this motion please thee?Tell me Andronicus doth this motion please thee?
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.372Not I, till Mutius' bones be buried.Not I tell Mutius bones be buried.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.398Whether by device or no, the heavens can tell.(Whether by deuise or no) the heauens can tell,
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.78I tell you, lords, you do but plot your deathsI tell you Lords, you doe but plot your deaths,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.174That womanhood denies my tongue to tell.That womanhood denies my tongue to tell:
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.220O tell me who it is, for ne'er till nowOh tell me how it is, for nere till now
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.1So now go tell, and if thy tongue can speak,So now goe tell and if thy tongue can speake,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.37Therefore I tell my sorrows to the stones,Therefore I tell my sorrowes bootles to the stones.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.107Nor tongue to tell me who hath martyred thee.Nor tongue to tell me who hath martyr'd thee:
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.193Tell him it was a hand that warded himTell him, it was a hand that warded him
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.27To bid Aeneas tell the tale twice o'erTo bid Aneas tell the tale twice ore
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.52O, tell me, did you see Aaron the Moor?O tell me, did you see Aaron the Moore?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.92I tell you, younglings, not EnceladusI tell you young-lings, not Enceladus
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.103(To Nurse) Tell the Empress from me I am of ageTell the Empresse from me, I am of age
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.144Go to the Empress, tell her this I said:Goe to the Empresse, tell her this I said,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.155And tell them both the circumstance of all,And tell them both the circumstance of all,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.15Tell him it is for justice and for aid,Tell him it is for iustice, and for aide,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.97Tell me, can you deliver an oration to the EmperorTell mee, can you deliuer an Oration to the Emperour
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.118Knock at my door, and tell me what he says.Knocke at my dore, and tell me what he sayes.
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.69Tell on thy mind; I say thy child shall live.Tell on thy minde, / I say thy Childe shall liue.
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.7Tell him Revenge is come to join with himTell him Reuenge is come to ioyne with him,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.39And in their ears tell them my dreadful name,And in their eares tell them my dreadfull name,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.127Tell him the Emperor and the Empress tooTell him the Emperour, and the Empresse too,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.138Whiles I go tell my lord the EmperorWhiles I goe tell my Lord the Emperour,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.149Tell us, old man, how shall we be employed?Tell vs old man, how shall we be imploy'd?
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.52What, was she ravished? Tell who did the deed.What was she rauisht? tell who did the deed,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.84Tell us what Sinon hath bewitched our ears,Tell vs what Sinon hath bewicht our eares,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.93Here's Rome's young captain: let him tell the tale,Heere is a Captaine, let him tell the tale,
Troilus and CressidaTC prologue.26To tell you, fair beholders, that our playTo tell you (faire Beholders) that our Play
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.36I was about to tell thee – when my heart,I was about to tell thee, when my heart,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.49O Pandarus! I tell thee, Pandarus – Oh Pandarus! I tell thee Pandarus;
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.50When I do tell thee, there my hopes lie drowned,When I doe tell thee, there my hopes lye drown'd:
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.52They lie indrenched. I tell thee I am madThey lye indrench'd. I tell thee, I am mad
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.84and so I'll tell her the next time I see her. For my part,and so Ile tell her the next time I see her: for my part,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.100Tell me, Apollo, for thy Daphne's love,Tell me Apollo for thy Daphnes Loue
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.56lay about him today, I can tell them that, and there'slay about him to day I can tell them that, and there's
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.58heed of Troilus, I can tell them that too.heede of Troylus; I can tell them that too.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.85Th' other's not come to't; you shall tell meTh'others not come too't, you shall tell me
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.183we may see most bravely. I'll tell you them all by theirwe may see most brauely, Ile tel you them all by their
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.187one of the flowers of Troy, I can tell you, but markone of the flowers of Troy I can you, but marke
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.191tell you, and he's a man good enough; he's onetell you, and hee's a man good inough, hee's one
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.275Good boy, tell him I come.Good Boy tell him I come,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.291Tell him of Nestor, one that was a manTell him of Nestor, one that was a man
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.295To answer for his love, tell him from me,To answer for his Loue; tell him from me,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.298And, meeting him, will tell him that my ladyAnd meeting him, wil tell him, that my Lady
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.47thou use to beat me, I will begin at thy heel, and tellthou vse to beat me, I wil begin at thy heele, and tel
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.73head – I'll tell you what I say of him.head, Ile tell you what I say of him.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.43Thy commander, Achilles. Then tell me,Thy Commander Achilles, then tell me
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.45Thy lord, Thersites. Then tell me, I prayThy Lord Thersites: then tell me I pray
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.47Thy knower, Patroclus. Then tell me, Patroclus,Thy knower Patroclus: then tell me Patroclus,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.49Thou mayst tell that knowest.Thou maist tell that know'st.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.50O, tell, tell.O tell, tell.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.120Are like to rot untasted. Go and tell himAre like to rot vntasted: goe and tell him,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.131Rode on his tide. Go tell him this; and addRode on his tyde. Goe tell him this, and adde,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.137Before a sleeping giant.’ Tell him so.Before a sleeping Gyant: tell him so.
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.109are constant being won; they are burs, I can tell you,are constant being wonne: they are Burres I can tell you,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.273To him, Patroclus. Tell him I humbly desireTo him Patroclus; tell him, I humbly desire
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.52And tell me, noble Diomed, faith, tell me true,And tell me noble Diomed; faith tell me true,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.34Did not I tell you? – Would he were knocked i'th' head!Did not I tell you? would he were knockt ith' head.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.80lord? Gone? Tell me, sweet uncle, what's the matter?Lord? gone? tell me sweet Vnckle, what's the matter?
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iii.4Tell you the lady what she is to do,Tell you the Lady what she is to doe,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.2Why tell you me of moderation?Why tell you me of moderation?
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.88But I can tell that in each grace of theseBut I can tell that in each grace of these,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.122In praising her. I tell thee, lord of Greece,I praising her. I tell thee Lord of Greece:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.135Come, to the port. – I'll tell thee, Diomed,Come to the Port. Ile tell thee Diomed,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.160The worthiest of them tell me name by name;The worthiest of them, tell me name by name:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.242Tell me, you heavens, in which part of his bodyTell me you Heauens, in which part of his body
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.251.2I tell thee, yea.I tell thee yea.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.252Wert thou the oracle to tell me so,Wert thou the Oracle to tell me so,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.277My Lord Ulysses, tell me, I beseech you,My Lord Ulysses, tell me I beseech you,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.287As gentle tell me, of what honour wasAs gentle tell me, of what Honour was
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.22I'll tell you what – Ile tell you what.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.23Foh, foh, come, tell a pin! You are forsworn.Fo, fo, eome tell a pin, you are a forsworne.-----
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.91.2Come, tell me whose it was.Come tell me whose it was?
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.95And by herself, I will not tell you whose.And by her selfe, I will not tell you whose.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.120But if I tell how these two did co-act,But if I tell how these two did coact;
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.66To tell thee that this day is ominous.to tell thee that this day is ominous:
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.93Do deeds worth praise, and tell you them at night.Doe deedes of praise, and tell you them at night.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.106I cannot tell what to think on't. – What says she there?I cannot tell what to thinke on't. What sayes shee there?
Troilus and CressidaTC V.v.4Tell her I have chastised the amorous Trojan,Tell her, I haue chastis'd the amorous Troyan.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.x.11You understand me not that tell me so.You vnderstand me not, that tell me so:
Troilus and CressidaTC V.x.15Who shall tell Priam so, or Hecuba?Who shall tell Priam so? or Hecuba?
Twelfth NightTN I.iv.17And tell them, there thy fixed foot shall growAnd tell them, there thy fixed foot shall grow
Twelfth NightTN I.v.1Nay, either tell me where thou hast been, or I willNay, either tell me where thou hast bin, or I will
Twelfth NightTN I.v.8A good lenten answer! I can tell thee where thatA good lenton answer: I can tell thee where yt
Twelfth NightTN I.v.141Tell him, he shall not speak with me.Tell him, he shall not speake with me.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.164I pray you, tell me if this be the lady of the house, for II pray you tell me if this bee the Lady of the house, for I
Twelfth NightTN I.v.197Some mollification for your giant, sweet lady! Tell meSome mollification for your Giant, sweete Ladie; tell me
Twelfth NightTN I.v.271To tell me how he takes it. Fare you well.To tell me how he takes it: Fare you well:
Twelfth NightTN I.v.292Would I or not. Tell him, I'll none of it.Would I, or not: tell him, Ile none of it.
Twelfth NightTN II.i.37least occasion more, mine eyes will tell tales of me. I amleast occasion more, mine eyes will tell tales of me: I am
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.94bade me tell you that, though she harbours you as herbad me tell you, that though she harbors you as her
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.133Possess us, possess us, tell us something of him.Possesse vs, possesse vs, tell vs something of him.
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.80Tell her my love, more noble than the world,Tell her my loue, more noble then the world
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.83Tell her I hold as giddily as fortune.Tell her I hold as giddily as Fortune:
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.91You tell her so. Must she not then be answered?You tel her so: Must she not then be answer'd?
Twelfth NightTN III.i.45By my troth, I'll tell thee, I am almost sick forBy my troth Ile tell thee, I am almost sicke for
Twelfth NightTN III.i.135I prithee, tell me what thou think'st of me?I prethee tell me what thou thinkst of me?
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.7Did she see thee the while, old boy, tell meDid she see the while, old boy, tell me
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.92not I tell you? Sir Toby, my lady prays you to have anot I tell you? Sir Toby, my Lady prayes you to haue a
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.294make me tell them how much I lack of a man.make me tell them how much I lacke of a man.
Twelfth NightTN IV.i.15tell me what I shall vent to my lady? Shall I vent to hertell me what I shall vent to my Lady? Shall I vent to hir
Twelfth NightTN IV.i.29This will I tell my lady straight. I would not be inThis will I tell my Lady straight, I would not be in
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.72Tell me how thy lady does – tell me how thy Lady does.
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.107paper. I tell thee, I am as well in my wits as any man inpaper, I tell thee I am as well in my wittes, as any man in
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.114I will help you to't. But tell me true, are you notI will help you too't. But tel me true, are you not
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.116Believe me, I am not. I tell thee true.Beleeue me I am not, I tell thee true.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.17Now my foes tell me plainly, I am an ass; so that by mynow my foes tell me plainly, I am an Asse: so that by my
Twelfth NightTN V.i.333And tell me in the modesty of honour,And tell me in the modestie of honor,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.342That e'er invention played on? Tell me why?That ere inuention plaid on? Tell me why?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.iii.1Tell me, Panthino, what sad talk was thatTell me Panthino, what sad talke was that,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.iii.24Then tell me, whither were I best to send him?Then tell me, whether were I best to send him?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.13Go to, sir. Tell me, do you know MadamGoe to, sir, tell me: do you know Madam
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.40But tell me, dost thou know my lady Silvia?But tell me: do'st thou know my Lady Siluia?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.120Now, tell me, how do all from whence you came?Now tell me: how do al from whence you came?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.30But tell me true, will't be a match?But tell me true, wil't be a match?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.44I tell thee my master is become a hot lover.I tell thee, my Master is become a hot Louer.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.45Why, I tell thee, I care not though he burn himselfWhy, I tell thee, I care not, though hee burne himselfe
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.5To lesson me and tell me some good meanTo lesson me, and tell me some good meane
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.50That fits as well as, ‘ Tell me, good my lord,That fits as well, as tell me (good my Lord)
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.59But tell me, wench, how will the world repute meBut tell me (wench) how will the world repute me
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.3Now, tell me, Proteus, what's your will with me?Now tell me Protheus, what's your will with me?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.123When would you use it? Pray, sir, tell me that.When would you vse it? pray sir, tell me that.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.266a woman; but what woman I will not tell myself; anda woman; but what woman, I will not tell my selfe: and
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.287I will try thee. Tell me this: who begot thee?I will try thee: tell me this: who begot thee?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.360Why, then will I tell thee – that thy master staysWhy then, will I tell thee, that thy Master staies
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.368Why didst not tell me sooner? Pox of your loveWhy didst not tell me sooner? 'pox of your loue
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.41Tell us this: have you anything to takeTell vs this: haue you any thing to take
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.72I tell you what Launce, his man, told me: he lovedI tell you what Launce his man told me, / He lou'd
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.83This letter. That's her chamber. Tell my ladyThis Letter: that's her chamber: Tell my Lady,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.115Go, give your master this. Tell him from me,Goe, giue your Master this: tell him from me,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.169Please you, I'll tell you as we pass along,Please you, Ile tell you, as we passe along,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.i.99Tell him, if he i'th' blood-sized field lay swollen,Tell him if he i'th blood cizd field, lay swolne
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.114That never-erring arbitrator, tell usThat never erring Arbitratour, tell us
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.20Or tell of babes broached on the lance, or womenOr tell of Babes broachd on the Launce, or women
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.20I can tell you they are princes.I can tell you they are princes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.157To tell the world 'tis but a gaudy shadowTo tell the world, tis but a gaudy shaddow,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.211I cannot tell what you have done; I have,I cannot tell what you have done, I have,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.v.16And tell to memory my death was noble,And tell to memory, my death was noble,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.15Most guiltless on't! Tell me, O Lady Fortune,most giltlesse on't: tell me O Lady Fortune
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.18.2Stay, I'll tell youStay, Ile tell you
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iv.12Would I could find a fine frog; he would tell meWould I could finde a fine Frog; he would tell me
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.47Nay, an she fail me once – you can tell, Arcas,Nay and she faile me once, you can tell Arcas
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.79.3I can tell your fortune.I can tell your fortune.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.80You are a fool. Tell ten; I have posed him. Buzz!You are a foole: tell ten, I have pozd him: Buz
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.53.2Do. Pray thee tell me, cousin,Do: pray thee tell me Cosen,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.179That I may tell my soul he shall not have her.That I may tell my Soule he shall not have her.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.52I'll tell you quickly. As I late was anglingIle tell you quickly. As I late was angling
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.103.1And hither came to tell you.And hether came to tell you:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.122But she shall never have him, tell her so,But she shall never have him, tell her so,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.29Faith, I'll tell you, sometime we go toFaith ile tell you, sometime we goe to
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.24I will, and tell her her Palamon stays for her.I will, and tell her / Her Palamon staies for her:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.71.1And tell me how it goes.And tell me how it goes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.30I shall be glad of. Prithee tell her so;I shall be glad of, pre'thee tell her so:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.56Did rather tell than trample, for the horseDid rather tell, then trample; for the horse
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.30Charge him too coldly. Tell him you are sureCharge him too coldly. Tell him, you are sure
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.34To tell he longs to see his son were strong.To tell, he longs to see his Sonne, were strong:
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.91I prithee tell me. Cram's with praise, and make'sI prethee tell me: cram's with prayse, and make's
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.406.2Sir, I will tell you,Sir, I will tell you,
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.30Dwelt by a churchyard – I will tell it softly:Dwelt by a Church-yard: I will tell it softly,
The Winter's TaleWT II.ii.51.2Tell her, Emilia,Tell her (Emilia)
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.106Tell me what blessings I have here aliveTell me what blessings I haue here aliue,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.112But what your jealousies awake, I tell youBut what your Iealousies awake) I tell you
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.86Prince. I cannot tell, good sir, for which of his virtues itPrince: I cannot tell good sir, for which of his Vertues it
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.186several tunes faster than you'll tell money; he uttersseuerall Tunes, faster then you'l tell money: hee vtters
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.289can tell you.can tell you.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.299Thou to me thy secrets tell.Thou to me thy secrets tell.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.440I was about to speak and tell him plainly,I was about to speake, and tell him plainely,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.658What I do next shall be to tell the KingWhat I doe next, shall be to tell the King
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.683other way but to tell the King she's a changeling andother way, but to tell the King she's a Changeling, and
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.694I will tell the King all, every word – yea, andI will tell the King all, euery word, yea, and
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.789being so capital? Tell me, for you seem to be honest,being so capitall? Tell me (for you seeme to be honest
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.64Her eye, and tell me for what dull part in'tHer eye, and tell me for what dull part in't
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.123Upon my daughter's head! Tell me, mine own,Vpon my daughters head: Tell me (mine owne)

Poems

 29 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.73 Let it not tell your judgement I am old; Let it not tell your Iudgement I am old,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.253 ‘ How mighty then you are, Oh, hear me tell, How mightie then you are, Oh heare me tell,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.2.10 Suspect I may, yet not directly tell; Suspect I may (yet not directly tell:
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.7 And when thou com'st thy tale to tell, And when thou comst thy tale to tell,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.444 Do tell her she is dreadfully beset, Do tell her shee is dreadfullie beset,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.480 Shall plead for me and tell my loving tale. Shall plead for me and tell my louing tale.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.813 ‘ The nurse to still her child will tell my story, The nourse to still her child will tell my storie,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1275 ‘ But tell me, girl, when went ’ – and there she stayed, But tell me girle, when went (and there shee staide,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1288 When more is felt than one hath power to tell. When more is felt then one hath power to tell.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1496 So Lucrece, set a-work, sad tales doth tell So LVCRECE set a worke, sad tales doth tell
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1603 And tell thy grief, that we may give redress.’ And tell thy griefe, that we may giue redresse.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1617 To tell them all with one poor tired tongue. To tell them all with one poore tired tong.
SonnetsSonn.3.1 Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest LOoke in thy glasse and tell the face thou vewest,
SonnetsSonn.14.3 But not to tell of good, or evil luck, But not to tell of good, or euil lucke,
SonnetsSonn.14.5 Nor can I fortune to brief minutes tell, Nor can I fortune to breefe mynuits tell;
SonnetsSonn.28.9 I tell the day to please him thou art bright, I tell the Day to please him thou art bright,
SonnetsSonn.30.10 And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er And heauily from woe to woe tell ore
SonnetsSonn.76.7 That every word doth almost tell my name, That euery word doth almost fel my name,
SonnetsSonn.84.7 But he that writes of you, if he can tell But he that writes of you, if he can tell,
SonnetsSonn.89.12 And haply of our old acquaintance tell. And haplie of our old acquaintance tell.
SonnetsSonn.93.12 Thy looks should nothing thence but sweetness tell. Thy lookes should nothing thence, but sweetnesse tell.
SonnetsSonn.98.7 Could make me any summer's story tell, Could make me any summers story tell:
SonnetsSonn.103.12 Than of your graces and your gifts to tell. Then of your graces and your gifts to tell.
SonnetsSonn.139.5 Tell me thou lov'st elsewhere; but in my sight, Tell me thou lou'st else-where; but in my sight,
SonnetsSonn.140.6 Though not to love, yet, love, to tell me so; Though not to loue, yet loue to tell me so,
SonnetsSonn.144.10 Suspect I may, but not directly tell; Suspect I may, yet not directly tell,
SonnetsSonn.151.7 My soul doth tell my body that he may My soule doth tell my body that he may,
Venus and AdonisVen.585 Tell me, love's master, shall we meet tomorrow? Tell me loues maister, shall we meete to morrow,
Venus and AdonisVen.805 ‘ More I could tell, but more I dare not say; More I could tell, but more I dare not say,

Glossary

 26 result(s).
belieslander, tell lies about
bidcommand, order, enjoin, tell
bringinform, report, tell
charmbind, order, tell
deliverreport [to], communicate [to], tell, describe
demandrequest to tell, question, ask [about]
deploretell with grief, express with lamentation
foretelltell earlier, say beforehand
imparttell, make known, communicate
informreport, relate, tell
learninform of, tell about
promiseassure, declare [to], tell plainly
pronouncetell, narrate, report
resolveinform, tell
saydeliver, report, tell
soothsaytell the future, prophesy, make predictions
taxorder, tell, command
tellcount out, number, itemize
tellcommunicate, make known
tellsay, assert, put it about
tellrebuke, admonish, reprove
telldisclose, reveal, explain
telltell the time on
tellspell out, narrate, recount
tellcount out, reckon up
warranttell, assure, give good grounds to

Thesaurus

 26 result(s).
earlier, tellforetell
future, tell thesoothsay
grief, tell withdeplore
lies about, tellbelie
plainly tellpromise
request to telldemand
tellbring
telltax
tellcharm
tellinform
telldeliver
tellbid
tellpronounce
tellimpart
tellresolve
tellwarrant
tellsay
tell aboutlearn
tell earlierforetell
tell lies aboutbelie
tell plainlypromise
tell the futuresoothsay
tell the timetell
tell with griefdeplore
tell, request todemand
time, tell the tell

Themes and Topics

 6 result(s).
Attention signals...aughter to schoolmaster] you are a fool tell ten i have posed him buzz hu...
...io and barnardo] good now sit down and tell me he that knows hear ye 1h4...
Discourse markers...ay’st me so friend is that what you tell me a prompt for x to continue ...
Exclamations...antern] [second carrier] ay when canst tell derision when nay 3h6 v...
... best tim v i 22 [poet] i must tell him of an intent that&rsquo s coming tow...
Responses...is’t no ham i v 119 good my lord tell it no you will reveal it no ham ...
What and what...r whoever what 2h4 i ii 114 what tell you me of it why what for what ...
French... dites-moi si je parle bien - > listen tell me if `i speak correctly - h5 iii iv 17 ...
... 18  dites-moi l'anglais pour le bras > tell me the english for the arm h5 iii iv 20...
...e couper votre gorge   > he orders me to tell you that you should make yourself ready ...
...dire (v ) h5 iv iv 34   to say tell disposé (v ) h5 iv iv 35 ...
...es (v ) h5 iii iv 15 dire [you] tell divine [devin] (adj f ) h5 ...

Words Families

 14 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
FORETELLBASICsee TELL
RETOLDBASICsee TELL
TELLBASICtell v, telling n
TELLAMOUNTall-telling adj
TELLEXTRAretell v, twice-told adj
TELLPEOPLEfortune-teller n, teller n, tell-tale n, fortune-telling n
TELLTRUTHtrue-telling adj
TELLNOT untold adj
UNTOLDBASICsee TELL

Snippets

 0 result(s).
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