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Search phrase: sport

Plays

 125 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.95We'll make you some sport with the foxWeele make you some sport with the Foxe
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.63much sport out of him; by his authority he remainsmuch sport out of him, by his authoritie hee remaines
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.320So, I thank thee. Wait on me home, I'll make sport withSo I thanke thee, waite on me home, Ile make sport with
Antony and CleopatraAC I.i.47Without some pleasure now. What sport tonight?Without some pleasure now. What sport to night?
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iv.29That drums him from his sport and speaks as loudThat drummes him from his sport, and speakes as lowd
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.vii.15.1'Tis sport to maul a runner.'Tis sport to maul a Runner.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xv.32Here's sport indeed! How heavy weighs my lord!Heere's sport indeede: / How heauy weighes my Lord?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.25Marry, I prithee do, to make sport withal; but loveMarry I prethee doe, to make sport withall: but loue
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.26no man in good earnest, nor no further in sport neither,no man in good earnest, nor no further in sport neyther,
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.29What shall be our sport then?What shall be our sport then?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.94Fair princess, you have lost much good sport.Faire Princesse, you haue lost much good sport.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.95Sport? Of what colour?Sport: of what colour?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.124But what is the sport, Monsieur, that theBut what is the sport Monsieur, that the
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.128the first time that ever I heard breaking of ribs was sportthe first time that euer I heard breaking of ribbes was sport
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.157That he in sport doth call his ‘ Rosalind.’That he in sport doth call his Rosalind.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.30When the sun shines let foolish gnats make sport,When the sunne shines, let foolish gnats make sport, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.27'Tis holy sport to be a little vain'Tis holy sport to be a little vaine,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.82But, sirrah, you shall buy this sport as dearBut sirrah, you shall buy this sport as deere,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.103That would behold in me this shameful sport.That would behold in me this shamefull sport.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.83In food, in sport, and life-preserving restIn food, in sport, and life-preseruing rest 
CoriolanusCor II.ii.103Turn terror into sport. As weeds beforeTurne terror into sport: as Weeds before
CymbelineCym II.iv.48Your loss your sport: I hope you know that weYour losse, your Sport: I hope you know that we
CymbelineCym III.iii.10Now for our mountain sport, up to yond hill!Now for our Mountaine sport, vp to yond hill
CymbelineCym IV.ii.31.1I wish ye sport.I wish ye sport.
HamletHam II.ii.511When she saw Pyrrhus make malicious sportWhen she saw Pyrrhus make malicious sport
HamletHam III.ii.227Sport and repose lock from me day and night,Sport and repose locke from me day and night:
HamletHam III.iv.207For 'tis the sport to have the enginer
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.203To sport would be as tedious as to work;To sport, would be as tedious as to worke;
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.296Till fields, and blows, and groans applaud our sport!Till fields, and blowes, and grones, applaud our sport.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.71dreamest not of, the which for sport sake are content todream'st not of, the which (for sport sake) are content to
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.383O Jesu, this is excellent sport, i'faith.This is excellent sport, yfaith.
Henry VH5 IV.ii.21And sheathe for lack of sport. Let us but blow on them,And sheath for lack of sport. Let vs but blow on them,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.ii.45Will turn unto a peaceful comic sport,Will turne vnto a peacefull Comick sport,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.2I saw not better sport these seven years' day;I saw not better sport these seuen yeeres day:
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.45We had had more sport. (aside to Gloucester) Come with thy two-hand sword.We had had more sport. Come with thy two-hand Sword.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.338And think it but a minute spent in sport.And thinke it but a minute spent in sport.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.92Thou wouldst be fee'd, I see, to make me sport;Thou would'st be fee'd, I see, to make me sport:
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.34So many hours must I sport myself,So many Houres, must I Sport my selfe:
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.47Of this great sport together, as you guess?Of this great Sport together? Nor. As you guesse:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.114How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport,How many times shall Casar bleed in sport,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.235But thou mayst lend it me to sport withal.But thou maist leue it me to sport with all,.
King JohnKJ V.ii.175Whom he hath used rather for sport than need – Whom he hath vs'd rather for sport, then neede)
King LearKL I.i.22was good sport at his making, and the whoreson must bewas good sport at his making, and the horson must be
King LearKL II.i.35.1Do more than this in sport.Do more then this in sport;
King LearKL IV.i.37.1They kill us for their sport.They kill vs for their sport.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.177Costard the swain and he shall be our sport,Costard the swaine and he, shall be our sport,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.100A phantasime, a Monarcho, and one that makes sportA Phantasime, a Monarcho, and one that makes sport
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.ii.1Very reverend sport, truly, and done in theVery reuerent sport truely, and done in the
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.i.149Most dull, honest Dull! To our sport,Most Dull, honest Dull, to our sport
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.153There's no such sport as sport by sport o'erthrown,Theres no such sport, as sport by sport orethrowne:
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.473Forestall our sport, to make us thus untrue?Forestall our sport, to make vs thus vntrue?
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.514That sport best pleases that doth least know how –That sport best pleases, that doth least know how.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.519A right description of our sport, my lord.A right description of our sport my Lord.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.865Might well have made our sport a comedy.Might wel haue made our sport a Comedie.
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.113He had some feeling of the sport. He knew the service,He had some feeling of the sport, hee knew the seruice,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.142Your single bond, and, in a merry sport,Your single bond, and in a merrie sport
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.216No, we shall ne'er win at that sport, and stakeNo, we shal nere win at that sport, and stake
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.270I love the sport well, but I shall as soon quarrelI loue the sport well, but I shall as soone quarrell
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.184us? We have sport in hand.vs? we haue sport in hand.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.194tell you what our sport shall be.tell you what our sport shall be.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.73me to dinner. Besides your cheer, you shall have sportme to dinner: besides your cheere you shall haue sport,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.142without cause, why then make sport at me; then let mewithout cause, / Why then make sport at me, then let me
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.159sport anon. Follow me, gentlemen.sport anon: / Follow me Gentlemen.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.32sport, to make another experiment of his suspicion. Butsport, to make another experiment of his suspition: But
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.152me for ever be your table sport. Let them say of me, 'Asme for euer be your Table-sport: Let them say of me, as
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.iv.13Yet once again, to make us public sport,Yet once againe (to make vs publike sport)
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.ii.12well. Heaven prosper our sport! No man means evil butwel: Heauen prosper our sport. No man means euill but
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.234And laugh this sport o'er by a country fire;And laugh this sport ore by a Countrie fire,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.87But with thy brawls thou hast disturbed our sport.But with thy braules thou hast disturb'd our sport.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.14Who Pyramus presented, in their sportWho Piramus presented, in their sport,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.119That must needs be sport alone;That must needs be sport alone:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.161A poor soul's patience, all to make you sport.A poore soules patience, all to make you sport.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.194To fashion this false sport in spite of me.To fashion this false sport in spight of me.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.240This sport well carried shall be chronicled.This sport well carried, shall be chronicled.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.353As this their jangling I esteem a sport.As this their iangling I esteeme a sport.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.389I with the morning's love have oft made sport,I, with the mornings loue haue oft made sport,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.17our sport had gone forward, we had all been made men.our sport had gone forward, we had all bin made men.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.79Unless you can find sport in their intents,Vnlesse you can finde sport in their intents,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.90Our sport shall be to take what they mistake;Our sport shall be, to take what they mistake;
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.166Thou thinkest I am in sport; I pray thee tell meThou think'st I am in sport, I pray thee tell me
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.157To what end? He would make but a sport of itTo what end? he would but make a sport of it,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.211carry. The sport will be, when they hold onecarry: the sport will be, when they hold one
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.58She knew his love, lest she make sport at it.She knew his loue, lest she make sport at it.
OthelloOth I.iii.364pleasure, me a sport. There are many events in thepleasure, me a sport. There are many Euents in the
OthelloOth I.iii.380But for my sport and profit. I hate the Moor,But for my Sport, and Profit: I hate the Moore,
OthelloOth II.i.221made dull with the act of sport, there should be, againmade dull with the Act of Sport, there should be a game
OthelloOth II.ii.5bonfires, each man to what sport and revels his addictionBonfires, each man, to what Sport and Reuels his addition
OthelloOth II.iii.17sport for Jove.sport for Ioue.
OthelloOth IV.iii.96When they change us for others? Is it sport?When they change vs for others? Is it Sport?
OthelloOth IV.iii.100Desires for sport, and frailty, as men have?Desires for Sport? and Frailty, as men haue?
Richard IIR2 II.i.85No, misery makes sport to mock itself.No, misery makes sport to mocke it selfe:
Richard IIR2 III.iv.1What sport shall we devise here in this gardenWhat sport shall we deuise here in this Garden,
Richard IIR2 III.iv.9Therefore no dancing, girl. Some other sport.Therefore no Dancing (Girle) some other sport.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.289Mark, silent King, the moral of this sport:Marke silent King, the Morall of this sport,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.30Ah, sirrah, this unlooked-for sport comes well.Ah sirrah, this vnlookt for sport comes well:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.119Away, be gone;. The sport is at the best.Away, be gone, the sport is at the best.
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.89The rather for I have some sport in handThe rather for I haue some sport in hand,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.179To feast and sport us at thy father's house.To feast and sport vs at thy fathers house,
The TempestTem IV.i.74To come and sport. Her peacocks fly amain.To come, and sport: here Peacocks flye amaine:
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.51Let's ha' some sport with 'em.let's ha some sport with 'em.
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.67Is every flatterer's spirit. Who can call him his friendIs euery Flatterers sport: who can call him his Friend
Titus AndronicusTit II.ii.19And to our sport. (To Tamora) Madam, now shall ye seeAnd to our sport: Madam, now shall ye see,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.80And being intercepted in your sport,And being intercepted in your sport,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.197Well could I leave our sport to sleep awhile.Well could I leaue our sport to sleepe a while.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.70This was the sport, my lord! When Publius shot,This was the sport my Lord, when Publius shot,
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.96Trim sport for them which had the doing of it.trim sport for them that had the doing of it.
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.118And when I told the Empress of this sport,And when I told the Empresse of this sport,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.115Hark what good sport is out of town today!Harke what good sport is out of Towne to day.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.117But to the sport abroad, are you bound thither?But to the sport abroad, are you bound thither?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.175Shake in and out the rivet – and at this sportShake in and out the Riuet: and at this sport
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.107If anything more than your sport and pleasureIf any thing more then your sport and pleasure,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.239O, like a book of sport thou'lt read me o'er;O like a Booke of sport thou'lt reade me ore:
Twelfth NightTN II.i.43That danger shall seem sport, and I will go!That danger shall seeme sport, and I will go.
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.165Sport royal, I warrant you. I know my physic willSport royall I warrant you: I know my Physicke will
Twelfth NightTN II.v.2Nay, I'll come. If I lose a scruple of this sport,Nay Ile come: if I loose a scruple of this sport,
Twelfth NightTN II.v.173I will not give my part of this sport for a pensionI will not giue my part of this sport for a pension
Twelfth NightTN II.v.190If you will then see the fruits of the sport, markIf you will then see the fruites of the sport, mark
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.69that I cannot pursue with any safety this sport the upshot.that I cannot pursue with any safety this sport the vppeshot.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.32With willing sport, to the wild ocean.With willing sport to the wilde Ocean.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.96.2Some country sport, upon my life, sir.Some Countrey sport, upon my life Sir.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.120The body of our sport, of no small study.The body of our sport of no small study
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.55As patiently I was attending sport,As patiently I was attending sport,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.52sport! One cries ‘ O, this smoke!’, th' other ‘ This fire!’;sport: one cries, o this smoake, another this fire;
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.58.2What is this? Sport?What is this? Sport?
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.60Away with him, and let her sport herselfAway with him, and let her sport her selfe

Poems

 10 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
The Passionate PilgrimPP.12.5 Youth is full of sport, Age's breath is short; Youth is full of sport, Ages breath is short,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.17.31 All our evening sport from us is fled, All our euening sport from vs is fled,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.992 His time of folly and his time of sport; His time of follie, and his time of sport.
SonnetsSonn.95.6 (Making lascivious comments on thy sport) (Making lasciuious comments on thy sport)
SonnetsSonn.96.2 Some say thy grace is youth and gentle sport; Some say thy grace is youth and gentle sport,
Venus and AdonisVen.24 Being wasted in such time-beguiling sport.’ Being wasted in such time-beguiling sport.
Venus and AdonisVen.105 And for my sake hath learned to sport and dance, And for my sake hath learnd to sport, and daunce,
Venus and AdonisVen.124 Be bold to play, our sport is not in sight. Be bold to play, our sport is not in sight,
Venus and AdonisVen.154 From morn till night, even where I list to sport me. From morne till night, euen where I list to sport me.
Venus and AdonisVen.844 In suchlike circumstance, with suchlike sport. In such like circumstance, with such like sport:

Glossary

 14 result(s).
exercisemanly sport, martial practice
gamesterone drawn to amorous sport, one who plays the game, prostitute
maculationstain, sport, defilement
mirthjoke, diversion, sport
playdally, trifle, sport
sportrecreation, amusement, entertainment
sportmake merry, take pleasure (in)
sportexercise, athletic pastime
sportsexual recreation, intercourse, amorous dalliance
sportamuse, entertain, divert
sportsubject of sport
toyflirt, dally, make amorous sport
wantondally, trifle, sport
wantonplay, sport, frolic

Thesaurus

 10 result(s).
amorous sport, maketoy
amorous sport, one drawn togamester
manly sportexercise
sportmirth
sportmaculation
sportwanton
sportplay
sport, manlyexercise
sport, subject of sport
subject of sportsport

Themes and Topics

 3 result(s).
Negatives...o man in good earnest nor no further in sport neither lll v i 144 [holofernes] t...
Politeness...e [celia] marry i prithee do to make sport withal when asking for agreement ...
Frequently Encountered Words (FEW)... too wildly see also something (adv ) 2 sport (n ) recreation amusement entertainmen...
... 124 [touchstone to le beau] what is the sport that the ladies have lost ham iii ...
...7 [second player as queen to her king] sport and repose lock from me day and night 1...
...r wars / will turn unto a peaceful comic sport lll v ii 153 [princess to boyet] there&...
... [princess to boyet] there' s no such sport as...
...as sport by...
...by sport o' erthrown ...
...o' erthrown sport (n ) 2--4 (v ) still (adv ) constantly...

Words Families

 10 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
DISPORTBASICsee SPORT
OUTSPORTBASICsee SPORT
SPORTBASICsport n, sport v, sportful adj, sportive adj
SPORTACTIONdisport n, disport v
SPORTINTENSITYoutsport v
SPORTPLACEsporting-place n
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL