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Search phrase: knit

Plays

 36 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.131To make you brothers, and to knit your heartsTo make you Brothers, and to knit your hearts
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.113Then is Caesar and he for ever knit together.Then is Casar and he, for euer knit together.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.171Have knit again, and fleet, threatening most sea-like.Haue knit againe, and Fleete, threatning most Sea-like.
CymbelineCym II.iii.116Yet who than he more mean? – to knit their souls – (Yet who then he more meane) to knit their soules
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.175And knit our powers to the arm of peace.And knit our Powers to the Arme of Peace.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.20And large proportion of his strong-knit limbs.And large proportion of his strong knit Limbes.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.i.17The Earl of Armagnac, near knit to Charles,The Earle of Arminacke neere knit to Charles,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.3Why doth the great Duke Humphrey knit his brows,Why doth the Great Duke Humfrey knit his browes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.42Knit earth and heaven together.Knit earth and heauen together.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.20Thou smiling while he knit his angry brows;Thou smiling, while he knit his angry browes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.iii.4Have robbed my strong-knit sinews of their strength,Haue robb'd my strong knit sinewes of their strength,
King JohnKJ II.i.398I like it well! France, shall we knit our powersI like it well. France, shall we knit our powres,
King JohnKJ III.i.226This royal hand and mine are newly knit,This royall hand and mine are newly knit,
King JohnKJ IV.i.42I knit my handkercher about your browsI knit my hand-kercher about your browes
King JohnKJ V.ii.63That knit your sinews to the strength of mine.That knit your sinewes to the strength of mine.
MacbethMac III.i.18For ever knit.For euer knit.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.68much. No, he shall not knit a knot in his fortunes withmuch: no, hee shall not knit a knot in his fortunes, with
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.53I mean that my heart unto yours is knit,I meane that my heart vnto yours is knit,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.180These couples shall eternally be knit.These couples shall eternally be knit.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.188Thy stones with lime and hair knit up in thee.Thy stones with Lime and Haire knit vp in thee.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.42Not to knit my soul to an approved wanton.Not to knit my soule to an approued wanton.
OthelloOth I.iii.334I confess me knit to thy deserving with cables of perdurableI confesse me knit to thy deseruing, with Cables of perdurable
PericlesPer I.i.12To knit in her their best perfections.To knit in her, their best perfections.
PericlesPer II.iv.58When peers thus knit, a kingdom ever stands.When Peeres thus knit, a Kingdome euer stands.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.118But lately splintered, knit, and joined together,But lately splinter'd, knit, and ioyn'd together,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.ii.24I'll have this knot knit up tomorrow morning.Ile haue this knot knit vp to morrow morning.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.82of an indifferent knit. Let them curtsy with their leftof an indifferent knit, let them curtsie with their left
The TempestTem III.iii.90And these, mine enemies, are all knit upAnd these (mine enemies) are all knit vp
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.35Will knit and break religions, bless th' accursed,Will knit and breake Religions, blesse th'accurst,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.10If thou hadst hands to help thee knit the cord.If thou had'st hands to helpe thee knit the cord.
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.69O, let me teach you how to knit againOh let me teach you how, to knit againe
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.67On which the heavens ride, knit all Greeks' earsIn which the Heauens ride, knit all Greekes eares
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.45No, girl, I'll knit it up in silken stringsNo girle, Ile knit it vp in silken strings,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.300Item: She can knit.Item she can knit.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.302when she can knit him a stock?When she can knit him a stocke?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.112The gout had knit his fingers into knots,The Gout had knit his fingers into knots,

Poems

 3 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
The Rape of LucreceLuc.709 With heavy eye, knit brow, and strengthless pace, With heauie eye, knit-brow, and strengthlesse pace,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.777 Knit poisonous clouds about his golden head. Knit poysonous clouds about his golden head.
SonnetsSonn.26.2 Thy merit hath my duty strongly knit, Thy merrit hath my dutie strongly knit;

Glossary

 8 result(s).
bend[of brows] knit, wrinkle, frown
knittie, fasten [by means of a knot]
knitentangle, tie up, catch up
knitrelate, join in blood
knitstyle, pattern, type
knitunite, join, make one
knitbuilt, constructed
sinewjoin strongly, knit, bind

Thesaurus

 2 result(s).
knit [join]sinew
knit [of brows]bend

Words Families

 6 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
KNITBASICknit v
KNITINTENSITYstrong-knit adj, well-knit adj
KNITPEOPLEknitter n
KNITNOTunknit v
UNKNITBASICsee KNIT
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL