if you are searching for a compound word, note that it might appear in any of three ways, reflecting varied editorial practice: spaced ('house keeper'), solid ('housekeeper'), or hyphenated ('house-keeper')
or use Advanced Search

Search results

Search phrase: awake

Plays

 77 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.13Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth.Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.88So awake when I am gone;So awake when I am gone:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.108Lysander, if you live, good sir, awake!Lysander, if you liue, good sir awake.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.69Durst thou have looked upon him being awake?Durst thou a lookt vpon him, being awake?
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.117Will cause Demetrius to awake.Will cause Demetrius to awake.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.192That we are awake? It seems to meIt seemes to mee,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.197Why, then, we are awake. Let's follow him,Why then we are awake; lets follow him,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ix.28.1Awake, sir, awake; speak to us.Awake sir, awake, speake to vs.
CoriolanusCor III.i.98Then vail your ignorance; if none, awakeThen vale your Ignorance: If none, awake
CymbelineCym II.ii.6And if thou canst awake by four o'th' clock,And if thou canst awake by foure o'th'clock,
CymbelineCym III.iv.45And cry myself awake? That's false to's bed, is it?And cry my selfe awake? That's false to's bed? Is it?
CymbelineCym V.iv.127And so I am awake. Poor wretches, that dependAnd so I am awake. Poore Wretches, that depend
HamletHam I.i.153Awake the god of day, and at his warning,Awake the God of Day: and at his warning,
HamletHam V.ii.226Roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness.Roughly awake, I heere proclaime was madnesse:
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.54But being awaked I do despise my dream.But being awake, I do despise my dreame.
Henry VH5 I.ii.22How you awake our sleeping sword of war.How you awake our sleeping Sword of Warre;
Henry VH5 I.ii.115Awake remembrance of these valiant dead,Awake remembrance of these valiant dead,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.78Awake, awake, English nobility!Awake, awake, English Nobilitie,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.164We will awake him, and be sure of him.We will awake him, and be sure of him.
Julius CaesarJC II.i.5When, Lucius, when? Awake, I say! What, Lucius!When Lucius, when? awake, I say: what Lucius?
Julius CaesarJC II.i.46Brutus, thou sleep'st: awake, and see thyself.Brutus thou sleep'st; awake, and see thy selfe:
Julius CaesarJC II.i.48‘ Brutus, thou sleep'st: awake.’Brutus, thou sleep'st: awake.
Julius CaesarJC II.i.88I have been up this hour, awake all night.I haue beene vp this howre, awake all Night:
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.16believe. Censure me in your wisdom, and awake yourbeleeue. Censure me in your Wisedom, and awake your
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.287Boy! Lucius! Varro! Claudius! Sirs, awake!Boy, Lucius, Varrus, Claudio, Sirs: Awake:
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.291Lucius, awake!Lucius, awake.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.298.1Fellow thou, awake!Fellow, / Thou: Awake.
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.25Awake thy craven powers, and tell onAwake thycrauen powers, and tell on
King JohnKJ II.i.81We must awake endeavour for defence;We must awake indeuor for defence,
King JohnKJ IV.i.26He will awake my mercy, which lies dead.He will awake my mercie, which lies dead:
King LearKL IV.vii.23Be by, good madam, when we do awake him;Be by good Madam when we do awake him,
King LearKL IV.vii.51He's scarce awake. Let him alone awhile.He's scarse awake, / Let him alone a while.
MacbethMac II.iii.70.2Awake, awake!awake, awake
MacbethMac II.iii.72Banquo and Donalbain, Malcolm, awake!Banquo, and Donalbaine: Malcolme awake,
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.93Had answered for his deed. Now 'tis awake,Had answer'd for his deed. Now 'tis awake,
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.29Tell him he must awake, and that quickly too.Tell him he must awake, / And that quickly too.
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.30Pray, Master Barnardine, awake till you arePray Master Barnardine, awake till you are
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.17ten nights awake carving the fashion of a new doublet.ten nights awake caruing the fashion of a new dublet:
OthelloOth I.i.80Awake! What, ho, Brabantio! Thieves, thieves!Awake: what hoa, Brabantio: Theeues, Theeues.
OthelloOth I.i.91Awake the snorting citizens with the bell,Awake the snorting Cittizens with the Bell,
PericlesPer I.iv.17They may awake their helpers to comfort them.they may awake / Their helpers, to comfort them.
PericlesPer II.iii.91And will awake him from his melancholy.And will awake him from his melancholy.
PericlesPer IV.ii.136I warrant you, mistress, thunder shall not so awakeI warrant you Mistresse, thunder shall not so awake
PericlesPer V.i.248Awake, and tell thy dream.awake and tell thy dreame.
Richard IIR2 III.ii.84Awake, thou coward majesty; thou sleepest.Awake thou sluggard Maiestie, thou sleepest:
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.287And there awake God's gentle-sleeping peace.And there awake Gods gentle sleeping peace.
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.145Awake, and think our wrongs in Richard's bosomAwake, / And thinke our wrongs in Richards Bosome,
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.146Will conquer him! Awake, and win the day!Will conquer him. Awake, and win the day.
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.147Bloody and guilty, guiltily awakeBloody and guilty: guiltily awake,
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.150(To Richmond) Quiet untroubled soul, awake, awake!Hast. to Rich. / Quiet vntroubled soule, / Awake, awake:
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.106And then awake as from a pleasant sleep.And then awake, as from a pleasant sleepe.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.113In the meantime, against thou shalt awake,Where all the kindred of the Capulets lie,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.114Shall Romeo by my letters know our drift.In the meane time against thou shalt awake,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.129sleep? Master Ford, awake; awake, Master Ford!sleepe? Master Ford awake, awake Master Ford:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.175I pray, awake, sir. If you love the maid,I pray awake sir: if you loue the Maide,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.193And with the clamour keep her still awake.And with the clamor keepe her stil awake:
The TempestTem I.ii.305Awake, dear heart, awake! Thou hast slept well.Awake, deere hart awake, thou hast slept well,
The TempestTem I.ii.306.1Awake!Awake.
The TempestTem II.i.310Awake, awake!Awake, awake.
The TempestTem II.i.313.1The others awake
The TempestTem II.i.313Why, how now? – Ho, awake! – Why are you drawn?Why how now hoa; awake? why are you drawn?
The TempestTem II.i.323And that a strange one too, which did awake me.(And that a strange one too) which did awake me:
The TempestTem IV.i.232And do the murder first. If he awake,And doe the murther first: if he awake,
The TempestTem V.i.100Being awake, enforce them to this place,Being awake, enforce them to this place;
The TempestTem V.i.229If I did think, sir, I were well awake,If I did thinke, Sir, I were well awake,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.112But what your jealousies awake, I tell youBut what your Iealousies awake) I tell you
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.446Being now awake, I'll queen it no inch farther,Being now awake, Ile Queene it no inch farther,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.95You do awake your faith. Then all stand still;You doe awake your Faith: then, all stand still:
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.98.2Music, awake her, strike!Musick; awake her: Strike:
Titus AndronicusTit II.ii.17I have been broad awake two hours and more.I haue bene awake two houres and more.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iv.25He'll so awake as he in fury shallHee'l so awake, as he in fury shall
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.251I bring a trumpet to awake his ear,I bring a Trumpet to awake his eare,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.255That thou shalt know, Trojan, he is awake,That thou shalt know Troyan he is awake,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.115Awake thee!awake thee.
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.18only to exasperate you, to awake your dormouse valour,onely to exasperate you, to awake your dormouse valour,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.40with her, and bring her along with you, it may awake mywith her, and bring her along with you, it may awake my
Twelfth NightTN V.i.45you say, sir, let your bounty take a nap – I will awake ityou say sir, let your bounty take a nappe, I will awake it

Poems

 2 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
SonnetsSonn.61.10 It is my love that keeps mine eye awake; It is my loue that keepes mine eie awake,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1628 And softly cried Awake, thou Roman dame, And softly cried, awake thou Romaine Dame,

Glossary

 10 result(s).
araiseraise from the dead, awake from the grave
awakearouse, prompt, force into action
overwatchstay up late, remain awake
wakeremain awake, stay up
wakecause to come out through staying awake
wakedawakened, aroused, roused
wakingawake, wakeful
watchstay awake, keep vigil
watch[falconry, in taming a hawk] prevent from sleeping, keep awake
watcherone who stays wide-awake

Thesaurus

 12 result(s).
awakewaking
awake from the gravearaise
awake, cause to come out by stayingwake
awake, keep [in falconry]watch
awake, one who stayswatcher
awake, remainwake
awake, remainoverwatch
awake, remainwatch
awakenedwaked
come out through staying awakewake
grave, awake from thearaise
stay awakewatch

Themes and Topics

 1 result(s).
Exclamations... when jc ii.i.5 when, lucius, when? awake , i say! impatience when, ay 1...

Words Families

 6 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
AWAKEBASICawake v, awaken v, awakening n, awaking n
WAKEBASICawake v, awakening n
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL