Antony and Cleopatra
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Flourish. Enter Pompey, at one doore Flourish. Enter Pompey and Menas at one door, AC II.vi.1.1
with Drum and Trumpet: at another Casar, Lepidus, with drum and trumpet; at another, Caesar, Lepidus, AC II.vi.1.2
Anthony, Enobarbus, Mecenas, Agrippa, Menas with Souldiers Antony, Enobarbus, Maecenas, Agrippa, with soldiers AC II.vi.1.3
Marching.marching AC II.vi.1.4
Pom. POMPEY 
Your Hostages I haue, so haue you mine:Your hostages I have; so have you mine; AC II.vi.1
And we shall talke before we fight.And we shall talk before we fight. AC II.vi.2.1
Casar. CAESAR 
Most meeteMost meetmeet (adj.)fit, suitable, right, properAC II.vi.2.2
that first we come to words, / And therefore haue weThat first we come to words; and therefore have we AC II.vi.3
Our written purposes before vs sent,Our written purposes before us sent;purpose (n.)intention, aim, planAC II.vi.4
Which if thou hast considered, let vs know,Which if thou hast considered, let us know AC II.vi.5
If 'twill tye vp thy discontented Sword,If 'twill tie up thy discontented sword AC II.vi.6
And carry backe to Cicelie much tall youth,And carry back to Sicily much tall youthtall (adj.)brave, valiant, boldAC II.vi.7
That else must perish heere.That else must perish here. AC II.vi.8.1
Pom. POMPEY 
To you all three,To you all three, AC II.vi.8.2
The Senators alone of this great world,The senators alone of this great world, AC II.vi.9
Chiefe Factors for the Gods. I do not know,Chief factors for the gods: I do not knowfactor (n.)agent, representative, brokerAC II.vi.10
Wherefore my Father should reuengers want,Wherefore my father should revengers want,want (v.)lack, need, be withoutAC II.vi.11
Hauing a Sonne and Friends, since Iulius Casar,Having a son and friends, since Julius Caesar,Julius Caesar[pron: 'seezer] Roman politician and general, 1st-c BCAC II.vi.12
Who at Phillippi the good Brutus ghosted,Who at Philippi the good Brutus ghosted,Philippi (n.)battle site in Thrace, Asia Minor, a victory for Mark AntonyAC II.vi.13
Brutus, MarcusMarcus Junius Brutus; 1st-c BC Roman politician, involved in the assassination of Julius Caesar
ghost (v.)haunt, appear as a ghost
There saw you labouring for him. What was'tThere saw you labouring for him. What was't AC II.vi.14
That mou'd pale Cassius to conspire? And whatThat moved pale Cassius to conspire? And whatCassius (n.)Gaius Cassius Longinus, Roman senator, 1st-c, a leader of the plot to kill Julius CaesarAC II.vi.15
Made all-honor'd, honest, Romaine Brutus,Made the all-honoured, honest, Roman Brutus, AC II.vi.16
With the arm'd rest, Courtiers of beautious freedome,With the armed rest, courtiers of beauteous freedom,courtier (n.)courter, wooer, pursuerAC II.vi.17
To drench the Capitoll, but that they wouldTo drench the Capitol, but that they wouldCapitol (n.)geographical and ceremonial centre of ancient Rome, the seat of governmentAC II.vi.18
Haue one man but a man, and that his itHave one man but a man? And that is it AC II.vi.19
Hath made me rigge my Nauie. At whose burthen,Hath made me rig my navy, at whose burdenrig (v.)
old form: rigge
fit out, equip, prepare
AC II.vi.20
The anger'd Ocean fomes, with which I meantThe angered ocean foams; with which I meant AC II.vi.21
To scourge th'ingratitude, that despightfull RomeTo scourge th' ingratitude that despiteful Romedespiteful (adj.)
old form: despightfull
cruel, spiteful, malicious
AC II.vi.22
Cast on my Noble Father.Cast on my noble father. AC II.vi.23.1
Casar. CAESAR 
Take your time.Take your time.time (n.)right moment, favourable opportunityAC II.vi.23.2
Ant. ANTONY 
Thou can'st not feare vs Pompey with thy sailes.Thou canst not fear us, Pompey, with thy sails.sail (n.)
old form: sailes
ship, vessel
AC II.vi.24
fear (v.)
old form: feare
frighten, scare, terrify, daunt
Weele speake with thee at Sea. At land thou know'stWe'll speak with thee at sea. At land thou know'stspeak (v.)
old form: speake
encounter, fight, exchange blows
AC II.vi.25
How much we do o're-count thee.How much we do o'ercount thee.overcount (v.)
old form: o're-count
outnumber, exceed in number
AC II.vi.26.1
Pom. POMPEY 
At Land indeedAt land indeed, AC II.vi.26.2
Thou dost orecount me of my Fatherrs house:Thou dost o'ercount me of my father's house; AC II.vi.27
But since the Cuckoo buildes not for himselfe,But since the cuckoo builds not for himself, AC II.vi.28
Remaine in't as thou maist.Remain in't as thou mayst. AC II.vi.29.1
Lepi. LEPIDUS 
Be pleas'd to tell vs,Be pleased to tell us –  AC II.vi.29.2
(For this is from the present how you take)For this is from the present – how you takepresent, from thebeside the present pointAC II.vi.30
The offers we haue sent you.The offers we have sent you. AC II.vi.31.1
Casar. CAESAR 
There's the point.There's the point. AC II.vi.31.2
Ant. ANTONY 
Which do not be entreated too, But waigh Which do not be entreated to, but weighweigh (v.)
old form: waigh
consider, take into account
AC II.vi.32
what it is worth imbrac'dWhat it is worth embraced. AC II.vi.33.1
Casar. CAESAR 
And what may followAnd what may follow, AC II.vi.33.2
to try a larger Fortune.To try a larger fortune.try (v.)try for, aim at, aspire toAC II.vi.34.1
Pom. POMPEY 
You haue made me offerYou have made me offer AC II.vi.34.2
Of Cicelie, Sardinia: and I mustOf Sicily, Sardinia; and I must AC II.vi.35
Rid all the Sea of Pirats. Then, to sendRid all the sea of pirates; then, to send AC II.vi.36
Measures of Wheate to Rome: this greed vpon,Measures of wheat to Rome; this 'greed upon, AC II.vi.37
To part with vnhackt edges, and beare backeTo part with unhacked edges and bear backedge (n.)sword, weaponAC II.vi.38
unhacked (adj.)
old form: vnhackt
unused, with no gashes
Our Targes vndinted.Our targes undinted.targe (n.)shieldAC II.vi.39.1
undinted (adj.)
old form: vndinted
unmarked by blows, without dents
Omnes. ALL THE TRIUMVIRS 
That's our offer.That's our offer. AC II.vi.39.2
Pom. POMPEY 
Know thenKnow, then, AC II.vi.39.3
I came before you heere, / A man prepar'dI came before you here a man prepared AC II.vi.40
To take this offer. But Marke Anthony,To take this offer. But Mark Antony AC II.vi.41
Put me to some impatience: though I loosePut me to some impatience. Though I lose AC II.vi.42
The praise of it by telling. You must knowThe praise of it by telling, you must know,praise (n.)credit, honour, prestigeAC II.vi.43
When Casar and your Brother were at blowes,When Caesar and your brother were at blows, AC II.vi.44
Your Mother came to Cicelie, and did findeYour mother came to Sicily and did find AC II.vi.45
Her welcome Friendly.Her welcome friendly. AC II.vi.46.1
Ant. ANTONY 
I haue heard it Pompey,I have heard it, Pompey, AC II.vi.46.2
And am well studied for a liberall thanks,And am well studied for a liberal thanks,studied (adj.)prepared, equipped, fittedAC II.vi.47
Which I do owe you.Which I do owe you. AC II.vi.48.1
Pom. POMPEY 
Let me haue your hand:Let me have your hand. AC II.vi.48.2
I did not thinke Sir, to haue met you heere,I did not think, sir, to have met you here. AC II.vi.49
Ant. ANTONY 
The beds i'th'East are soft, and thanks to you,The beds i'th' East are soft; and thanks to you, AC II.vi.50
That cal'd me timelier then my purpose hither:That called me timelier than my purpose hither;purpose (n.)intention, aim, planAC II.vi.51
timely (adv.)early, prematurely
For I haue gained by't.For I have gained by't. AC II.vi.52.1
CasarCAESAR  
(to Pompey) AC II.vi.52
Since I saw you last,Since I saw you last AC II.vi.52.2
ther's a change vpon you.There is a change upon you. AC II.vi.53.1
Pom. POMPEY 
Well, I know not,Well, I know not AC II.vi.53.2
What counts harsh Fotune cast's vpon my face,What counts harsh Fortune casts upon my face,Fortune (n.)Roman goddess, shown as a woman at a spinning wheel, or controlling a rudder, and as blindAC II.vi.54
count (n.)account, reckoning
cast (v.)calculate, reckon, estimate
But in my bosome shall she neuer come,But in my bosom shall she never come AC II.vi.55
To make my heart her vassaile.To make my heart her vassal.vassal (n.)
old form: vassaile
servant, slave, subject
AC II.vi.56.1
Lep. LEPIDUS 
Well met heere.Well met here. AC II.vi.56.2
Pom. POMPEY 
I hope so Lepidus, thus we are agreed:I hope so, Lepidus. Thus we are agreed. AC II.vi.57
I craue our composion may be writtenI crave our composition may be written,crave (v.)
old form: craue
beg, entreat, request
AC II.vi.58
composition (n.)
old form: composion
settlement, truce, coming to terms
And seal'd betweene vs,And sealed between us. AC II.vi.59.1
Casar. CAESAR 
That's the next to do.That's the next to do. AC II.vi.59.2
Pom. POMPEY 
Weele feast each other, ere we part, and lett'sWe'll feast each other ere we part, and let's AC II.vi.60
Draw lots who shall begin.Draw lots who shall begin. AC II.vi.61.1
Ant. ANTONY 
That will I Pompey.That will I, Pompey. AC II.vi.61.2
Pompey. POMPEY 
No Anthony take the lot:No, Antony, take the lot.lot (n.)result of casting lotsAC II.vi.62
but first or last, your fine Egyptian cookerie But, first or last, your fine Egyptian cookery AC II.vi.63
shall haue the fame, I haue heard that Iulius Casar,Shall have the fame. I have heard that Julius Caesar AC II.vi.64
grew fat with feasting there.Grew fat with feasting there. AC II.vi.65.1
Anth. ANTONY 
You haue heard much.You have heard much. AC II.vi.65.2
Pom. POMPEY 
I haue faire meaning Sir.I have fair meanings, sir. AC II.vi.66.1
Ant. ANTONY 
And faire words to them.And fair words to them. AC II.vi.66.2
Pom. POMPEY 
Then so much haue I heard,Then so much have I heard. AC II.vi.67
And I haue heard Appolodorus carried---And I have heard Apollodorus carried –  AC II.vi.68
Eno. ENOBARBUS 
No more that: he did so.No more of that: he did so. AC II.vi.69.1
Pom. POMPEY 
What I pray you?What, I pray you? AC II.vi.69.2
Eno. ENOBARBUS 
A certaine Queene to Casar in a Matris.A certain queen to Caesar in a mattress. AC II.vi.70
Pom. POMPEY 
I know thee now, how far'st thou Souldier?I know thee now. How far'st thou, soldier? AC II.vi.71.1
Eno. ENOBARBUS 
Well,Well; AC II.vi.71.2
and well am like to do, for I perceiueAnd well am like to do, for I perceive AC II.vi.72
Foure Feasts are toward.Four feasts are toward.toward (adv.)impending, forthcoming, in preparationAC II.vi.73.1
Pom. POMPEY 
Let me shake thy hand,Let me shake thy hand; AC II.vi.73.2
I neuer hated thee: I haue seene thee fight,I never hated thee; I have seen thee fight AC II.vi.74
When I haue enuied thy behauiour.When I have envied thy behaviour. AC II.vi.75.1
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
Sir,Sir, AC II.vi.75.2
I neuer lou'd you much, but I ha'prais'd ye,I never loved you much; but I ha' praised ye AC II.vi.76
When you haue well deseru'd ten times as much,When you have well deserved ten times as much AC II.vi.77
As I haue said you did.As I have said you did. AC II.vi.78.1
Pom. POMPEY 
Inioy thy plainnesse,Enjoy thy plainness;enjoy (v.)
old form: Inioy
indulge, give rein to, continue to practise
AC II.vi.78.2
plainness (n.)
old form: plainnesse
plain-speaking, openness, frankness
It nothing ill becomes thee:It nothing ill becomes thee.become (v.)be fitting, befit, be appropriate toAC II.vi.79
ill (adv.)badly, adversely, unfavourably
Aboord my Gally, I inuite you all.Aboard my galley I invite you all. AC II.vi.80
Will you leade Lords?Will you lead, lords? AC II.vi.81.1
All. ALL 
Shew's the way, sir.Show's the way, sir. AC II.vi.81.2
Pom.POMPEY 
Come. Come. AC II.vi.81.3
Exeunt. Manet Enob. & MenasExeunt all but Enobarbus and Menas AC II.vi.81
Men. MENAS  
(aside) AC II.vi.82
Thy Father Pompey would ne're haueThy father, Pompey, would ne'er have AC II.vi.82
made this Treaty. You, and I haue knowne sir.made this treaty. – You and I have known, sir.know (v.)
old form: knowne
be acquainted, meet before
AC II.vi.83
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
At Sea, I thinke.At sea, I think. AC II.vi.84
Men. MENAS 
We haue Sir.We have, sir. AC II.vi.85
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
You haue done well by water.You have done well by water. AC II.vi.86
Men. MENAS 
And you by Land.And you by land. AC II.vi.87
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
I will praise any man that will praise me,I will praise any man that will praise me; AC II.vi.88
thogh it cannot be denied what I haue done by Land.though it cannot be denied what I have done by land. AC II.vi.89
Men. MENAS 
Nor what I haue done by water.Nor what I have done by water. AC II.vi.90
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
Yes some-thing you can deny for your owneYes, something you can deny for your own AC II.vi.91
safety: you haue bin a great Theefe by Sea.safety: you have been a great thief by sea. AC II.vi.92
Men. MENAS 
And you by Land.And you by land. AC II.vi.93
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
There I deny my Land seruice: but giue meeThere I deny my land service. But give meland-service (n.)
old form: Land seruice
military service done on land
AC II.vi.94
your hand Menas, if our eyes had authority, heere theyyour hand, Menas. If our eyes had authority, here theyauthority (n.)right to command, position of powerAC II.vi.95
might take two Theeues kissing.might take two thieves kissing.kiss (v.)fraternize, associate, consortAC II.vi.96
Men. MENAS 
All mens faces are true, whatsomere their handsAll men's faces are true, whatsome'er their handstrue (adj.)honest, upright, law-abidingAC II.vi.97
are.are. AC II.vi.98
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
But there is neuer a fayre Woman, ha's a trueBut there is never a fair woman has a truetrue (adj.)reliable, trustworthy, dependableAC II.vi.99
Face.face. AC II.vi.100
Men. MENAS 
No slander, they steale hearts.No slander; they steal hearts. AC II.vi.101
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
We came hither to fight with you.We came hither to fight with you. AC II.vi.102
Men. MENAS 
For my part, I am sorry it is turn'd to a Drinking. For my part, I am sorry it is turned to a drinking. AC II.vi.103
Pompey doth this day laugh away his Fortune.Pompey doth this day laugh away his fortune. AC II.vi.104
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
If he do, sure he cannot weep't backe againe.If he do, sure he cannot weep't back again. AC II.vi.105
Men. MENAS 
Y'haue said Sir, we look'd not for Marke Anthony Y'have said, sir. We looked not for Mark Antony AC II.vi.106
heere, pray you, is he married to Cleopatra?here. Pray you, is he married to Cleopatra? AC II.vi.107
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
Casars Sister is call'd Octauia.Caesar's sister is called Octavia. AC II.vi.108
Men. MENAS 
True Sir, she was the wife of Caius Marcellus.True, sir; she was the wife of Caius Marcellus. AC II.vi.109
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
But she is now the wife of Marcus Anthonius.But she is now the wife of Marcus Antonius. AC II.vi.110
Men. MENAS 
Pray'ye sir.Pray ye, sir? AC II.vi.111
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
'Tis true.'Tis true. AC II.vi.112
Men. MENAS 
Then is Casar and he, for euer knit together.Then is Caesar and he for ever knit together. AC II.vi.113
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
If I were bound to Diuine of this vnity, IIf I were bound to divine of this unity, Idivine (v.)
old form: Diuine
make guesses [about], predict the outcome
AC II.vi.114
bound (adj.)obliged, required, forced
wold not Prophesie so.would not prophesy so. AC II.vi.115
Men. MENAS 
I thinke the policy of that purpose, made more inI think the policy of that purpose made more inmake (v.)matter, count, signifyAC II.vi.116
policy (n.)statecraft, statesmanship, diplomacy
purpose (n.)intention, aim, plan
the Marriage, then the loue of the parties.the marriage than the love of the parties. AC II.vi.117
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
I thinke so too. But you shall finde the bandI think so too. But you shall find the band AC II.vi.118
that seemes to tye their friendship together, will bee thethat seems to tie their friendship together will be the AC II.vi.119
very strangler of their Amity: Octauia is of a holy, cold,very strangler of their amity. Octavia is of a holy, cold, AC II.vi.120
and still conuersation.and still conversation.conversation (n.)
old form: conuersation
way of life, behaviour, manners, conduct
AC II.vi.121
still (adj.)quiet, calm, subdued
Men. MENAS 
Who would not haue his wife so?Who would not have his wife so? AC II.vi.122
Eno. ENOBARBUS 
Not he that himselfe is not so: which is MarkeNot he that himself is not so; which is Mark AC II.vi.123
Anthony: he will to his Egyptian dish againe: then shallAntony. He will to his Egyptian dish again. Then shall AC II.vi.124
the sighes of Octauia blow the fire vp in Caesar, and (asthe sighs of Octavia blow the fire up in Caesar, and, as AC II.vi.125
I said before) that which is the strength of their Amity,I said before, that which is the strength of their amity AC II.vi.126
shall proue the immediate Author of their variance. shall prove the immediate author of their variance.variance (n.)falling out, disagreement, discordAC II.vi.127
Anthony will vse his affection where it is. Hee married butAntony will use his affection where it is. He married butaffection (n.)desire, passion, lustful feelingAC II.vi.128
use (v.)
old form: vse
satisfy, fulfil, engage in
his occasion heere.his occasion here.occasion (n.)political opportunity, expedient circumstanceAC II.vi.129
Men. MENAS 
And thus it may be. Come Sir, will you aboord?And thus it may be. Come, sir, will you aboard? AC II.vi.130
I haue a health for you.I have a health for you.health (n.)toast, salutation in drinkAC II.vi.131
Enob. ENOBARBUS 
I shall take it sir: we haue vs'd our ThroatsI shall take it, sir. We have used our throatsuse (v.)
old form: vs'd
make use of, engage [in], practise [with]
AC II.vi.132
in Egypt.in Egypt. AC II.vi.133
Men.MENAS 
Come, let's away. Come, let's away. AC II.vi.134
Exeunt.Exeunt AC II.vi.133
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