Cymbeline
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Enter Clotten, and the two Lords.Enter Cloten and two Lords Cym II.i.1
Clot.CLOTEN 
Was there euer man had such lucke? when I kistWas there ever man had such luck? When I kissed Cym II.i.1
the Iacke vpon an vp-cast, to be hit away? I had a hundredthe jack upon an upcast, to be hit away! I had a hundredupcast (n.)
old form: vp-cast
[bowls] accident, chance; or: throw, pitch
Cym II.i.2
pound on't: and then a whorson Iacke-an-Apes,pound on't: and then a whoreson jackanapeswhoreson (adj.)
old form: whorson
[abusive intensifier, serious or jocular] bastard, wretched, vile
Cym II.i.3
jackanapes, jackanape, jack'nape (n.)
old form: Iacke-an-Apes
upstart, buffoon, monkey
must take me vp for swearing, as if I borrowed minemust take me up for swearing, as if I borrowed minetake up (v.)
old form: vp
rebuke, scold, reprimand
Cym II.i.4
oathes of him, and might not spend them at myoaths of him, and might not spend them at myspend (v.)expend, express, give vent toCym II.i.5
pleasure.pleasure. Cym II.i.6
1. FIRST LORD 
What got he by that? you haue broke his pateWhat got he by that? You have broke his patepate (n.)head, skullCym II.i.7
with your Bowle.with your bowl. Cym II.i.8
2. SECOND LORD  
(aside) Cym II.i.9
If his wit had bin like him that brokeIf his wit had been like him that brokewit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityCym II.i.9
it: it would haue run all out.it, it would have run all out. Cym II.i.10
Clot. CLOTEN 
When a Gentleman is dispos'd to sweare: it is not forWhen a gentleman is disposed to swear, it is not for Cym II.i.11
any standers by to curtall his oathes. Ha?any standers-by to curtail his oaths. Ha? Cym II.i.12
2. SECOND LORD 
No my Lord; nor crop the eares of them.No, my lord; (aside) nor crop the ears of them. Cym II.i.13
Clot. CLOTEN 
Whorson dog: I gaue him satisfaction? would heWhoreson dog! I give him satisfaction! Would hewhoreson (adj.)
old form: Whorson
[abusive intensifier, serious or jocular] bastard, wretched, vile
Cym II.i.14
had bin one of my Ranke.had been one of my rank! Cym II.i.15
2. SECOND LORD 
(aside) Cym II.i.16
To haue smell'd like a Foole.To have smelt like a fool. Cym II.i.16
Clot. CLOTEN 
I am not vext more at any thing in th'earth: a poxI am not vexed more at any thing in th' earth: a poxpox (n.)venereal disease; also: plague, or any other disease displaying skin pustulesCym II.i.17
on't. I had rather not be so Noble as I am: they dareon't! I had rather not be so noble as I am: they dare Cym II.i.18
not fight with me, because of the Queene my Mother:not fight with me, because of the queen my mother: Cym II.i.19
euery Iacke-Slaue hath his belly full of Fighting, and Ievery Jack-slave hath his bellyful of fighting, and IJack-slave (n.)
old form: Iacke-Slaue
knavish slave, villainous fellow
Cym II.i.20
must go vp and downe like a Cock, that no body canmust go up and down like a cock, that nobody can Cym II.i.21
match.match. Cym II.i.22
2. SECOND LORD  
(aside) Cym II.i.23
You are Cocke and Capon too, and youYou are cock and capon too, and youcapon (n.)castrated cockerel; so: fool, dolt [as term of abuse]Cym II.i.23
crow Cock, with your combe on.crow, cock, with your comb on. Cym II.i.24
Clot. CLOTEN 
Sayest thou?Sayest thou? Cym II.i.25
2. SECOND LORD 
It is not fit you Lordship should vndertakeIt is not fit your lordship should undertakeundertake (v.)
old form: vndertake
take on, fight with, engage in combat with
Cym II.i.26
euery Companion, that you giue offence too.every companion that you give offence to.companion (n.)rogue, rascal, fellowCym II.i.27
Clot. CLOTEN 
No, I know that: but it is fit I should commit offenceNo, I know that: but it is fit I should commit offence Cym II.i.28
to my inferiors.to my inferiors. Cym II.i.29
2. SECOND LORD 
I, it is fit for your Lordship onely.Ay, it is fit for your lordship only. Cym II.i.30
Clot. CLOTEN 
Why so I say.Why, so I say. Cym II.i.31
1. FIRST LORD 
Did you heere of a Stranger that's come to CourtDid you hear of a stranger that's come to courtstranger (n.)foreigner, alien, outsiderCym II.i.32
night?tonight?tonight (adv.)last night, this past nightCym II.i.33
Clot. CLOTEN 
A Stranger, and I not know on't?A stranger, and I know not on't? Cym II.i.34
2. SECOND LORD  
(aside) Cym II.i.35
He's a strange Fellow himselfe, andHe's a strange fellow himself, and Cym II.i.35
knowes it not.knows it not. Cym II.i.36
1. FIRST LORD 
There's an Italian come, and 'tis thought oneThere's an Italian come, and 'tis thought one Cym II.i.37
of Leonatus Friends.of Leonatus' friends. Cym II.i.38
Clot. CLOTEN 
Leonatus? A banisht Rascall; and he's another,Leonatus? A banished rascal; and he's another, Cym II.i.39
whatsoeuer he be. Who told you of this Stranger?whatsoever he be. Who told you of this stranger? Cym II.i.40
1. FIRST LORD 
One of your Lordships Pages.One of your lordship's pages. Cym II.i.41
Clot. CLOTEN 
Is it fit I went to looke vpon him? Is there no derogationIs it fit I went to look upon him? Is there no derogationderogation (n.)loss of dignity, disparagement, detractionCym II.i.42
in't?in't? Cym II.i.43
2. SECOND LORD 
You cannot derogate my Lord.You cannot derogate, my lord.derogate (v.)act in an undignified way, disparage one's rankCym II.i.44
Clot. CLOTEN 
Not easily I thinke.Not easily, I think. Cym II.i.45
2. SECOND LORD  
(aside) Cym I.vii.46
You are a Foole graunted, therefore yourYou are a fool granted, therefore yourgranted (adj.)
old form: graunted
acknowledged, admitted, recognized
Cym II.i.46
Issues being foolish do not derogate.issues being foolish do not derogate.issue (n.)action, deed, proceedingCym II.i.47
Clot. CLOTEN 
Come, Ile go see this Italian: what I haue lost to dayCome, I'll go see this Italian: what I have lost today Cym II.i.48
at Bowles, Ile winne to night of him. Come: go.at bowls I'll win tonight of him. Come: go. Cym II.i.49
2. SECOND LORD 
Ile attend your Lordship.I'll attend your lordship.attend (v.)accompany, follow closely, go withCym II.i.50
Exit.Exeunt Cloten and First Lord Cym II.i.50
That such a craftie Diuell as is his MotherThat such a crafty devil as is his mother Cym II.i.51
Should yeild the world this Asse: A woman, thatShould yield the world this ass! A woman that Cym II.i.52
Beares all downe with her Braine, and this her Sonne,Bears all down with her brain, and this her sonbear (v.), past forms bore, borne
old form: Beares
carry on, manage, conduct [an affair]
Cym II.i.53
Cannot take two from twenty for his heart,Cannot take two from twenty, for his heart, Cym II.i.54
And leaue eighteene. Alas poore Princesse,And leave eighteen. Alas, poor princess, Cym II.i.55
Thou diuine Imogen, what thou endur'st,Thou divine Innogen, what thou endur'st, Cym II.i.56
Betwixt a Father by thy Step-dame gouern'd,Betwixt a father by thy step-dame governed,stepdame, step-dame (n.)stepmotherCym II.i.57
A Mother hourely coyning plots: A Wooer,A mother hourly coining plots, a wooer Cym II.i.58
More hatefull then the foule expulsion isMore hateful than the foul expulsion is Cym II.i.59
Of thy deere Husband. Then that horrid ActOf thy dear husband, than that horrid act Cym II.i.60
Of the diuorce, heel'd make the Heauens hold firmeOf the divorce, he'ld make. The heavens hold firm Cym II.i.61
The walls of thy deere Honour. Keepe vnshak'dThe walls of thy dear honour, keep unshaked Cym II.i.62
That Temple thy faire mind, that thou maist standThat temple, thy fair mind, that thou mayst stand, Cym II.i.63
T'enioy thy banish'd Lord: and this great Land. T' enjoy thy banished lord and this great land! Cym II.i.64
Exeunt.Exit Cym II.i.64
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