Romeo and Juliet
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Enter Frier and Romeo.Enter Friar Laurence and Romeo RJ II.vi.1
Fri. FRIAR 
So smile the heauens vpon this holy act,So smile the heavens upon this holy act, RJ II.vi.1
That after houres, with sorrow chide vs not.That after-hours with sorrow chide us not!after-hours (n.)
old form: after houres
subsequent time, later moments
RJ II.vi.2
chide (v.), past form chidscold, rebuke, reprove
Rom. ROMEO 
Amen, amen, but come what sorrow can,Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can, RJ II.vi.3
It cannot counteruaile the exchange of ioyIt cannot countervail the exchange of joycountervail (v.)
old form: counteruaile
counterbalance, match, be equal to
RJ II.vi.4
That one short minute giues me in her sight:That one short minute gives me in her sight. RJ II.vi.5
Do thou but close our hands with holy words.Do thou but close our hands with holy words,close (v.)join, claspRJ II.vi.6
Then Loue-deuouring death do what he dare,Then love-devouring death do what he dare –  RJ II.vi.7
It is inough. I may but call her mine.It is enough I may but call her mine. RJ II.vi.8
Fri. FRIAR 
These violent delights haue violent endes,These violent delights have violent ends RJ II.vi.9
And in their triumph: die like fire and powder;And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,powder (n.)gunpowderRJ II.vi.10
triumph (n.)high point, joy of the moment
Which as they kisse consume. The sweetest honeyWhich as they kiss consume. The sweetest honey RJ II.vi.11
Is loathsome in his owne deliciousnesse,Is loathsome in his own deliciousness RJ II.vi.12
And in the taste confoundes the appetite.And in the taste confounds the appetite.confound (v.)
old form: confoundes
destroy, overthrow, ruin
RJ II.vi.13
Therefore Loue moderately, long Loue doth so,Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so. RJ II.vi.14
Too swift arriues as tardie as too slow.Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. RJ II.vi.15
Enter Iuliet.Enter Juliet somewhat fast. She embraces Romeo RJ II.vi.16
Here comes the Lady. Oh so light a footHere comes the lady. O, so light a foot RJ II.vi.16
Will nere weare out the euerlasting flint,Will ne'er wear out the everlasting flint. RJ II.vi.17
A Louer may bestride the Gossamours,A lover may bestride the gossamersgossamer (n.)
old form: Gossamours
fine thread of a spider's web
RJ II.vi.18
That ydles in the wanton Summer ayre,That idles in the wanton summer air,wanton (adj.)casual, gentleRJ II.vi.19
And yet not fall, so light is vanitie.And yet not fall. So light is vanity.light (adj.)[of counterfeit coins] of less weight, worthless, cheapRJ II.vi.20
vanity (n.)
old form: vanitie
worthlessness, futility, unprofitable way of life
Iul. JULIET 
Good euen to my ghostly Confessor.Good even to my ghostly confessor.even (n.)
old form: euen
evening
RJ II.vi.21
ghostly (adj.)spiritual, holy
Fri. FRIAR 
Romeo shall thanke thee Daughter for vs both.Romeo shall thank thee, daughter, for us both. RJ II.vi.22
Iul. JULIET 
As much to him, else in his thanks too much.As much to him, else is his thanks too much. RJ II.vi.23
Fri. ROMEO 
Ah Iuliet, if the measure of thy ioyAh, Juliet, if the measure of thy joy RJ II.vi.24
Be heapt like mine, and that thy skill be moreBe heaped like mine, and that thy skill be more RJ II.vi.25
To blason it, then sweeten with thy breathTo blazon it, then sweeten with thy breathbreath (n.)utterance, speech, voiceRJ II.vi.26
blazon (v.)
old form: blason
proclaim, display [as in a coat of arms]
This neighbour ayre, and let rich musickes tongue,This neighbour air, and let rich music's tongue RJ II.vi.27
Vnfold the imagin'd happinesse that bothUnfold the imagined happiness that both RJ II.vi.28
Receiue in either, by this deere encounter.Receive in either by this dear encounter. RJ II.vi.29
Iul. JULIET 
Conceit more rich in matter then in words,Conceit, more rich in matter than in words,conceit (n.)imagination, fancy, witRJ II.vi.30
matter (n.)subject-matter, content, substance
Brags of his substance, not of Ornament:Brags of his substance, not of ornament. RJ II.vi.31
They are but beggers that can count their worth,They are but beggars that can count their worth.worth (n.)means, resources, wherewithalRJ II.vi.32
But my true Loue is growne to such such excesse,But my true love is grown to such excess RJ II.vi.33
I cannot sum vp some of halfe my wealth.I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth. RJ II.vi.34
Fri. FRIAR 
Come, come with me, & we will make short worke,Come, come with me, and we will make short work. RJ II.vi.35
For by your leaues, you shall not stay alone,For, by your leaves, you shall not stay alone RJ II.vi.36
Till holy Church incorporate two in one.Till Holy Church incorporate two in one.incorporate (v.)make one body [of], uniteRJ II.vi.37
Exeunt RJ II.vi.37
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