Coriolanus
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Enter the two Tribunes, Sicinius, and Brutus.Enter the two Tribunes, Sicinius and Brutus Cor IV.vi.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
We heare not of him, neither need we fear him,We hear not of him, neither need we fear him. Cor IV.vi.1
His remedies are tame, the present peace,His remedies are tame – the present peace Cor IV.vi.2
And quietnesse of the people, which beforeAnd quietness of the people, which before Cor IV.vi.3
Were in wilde hurry. Heere do we make his FriendsWere in wild hurry. Here do we make his friends Cor IV.vi.4
Blush, that the world goes well: who rather had,Blush that the world goes well, who rather had, Cor IV.vi.5
Though they themselues did suffer by't, beholdThough they themselves did suffer by't, behold Cor IV.vi.6
Dissentious numbers pestring streets, then seeDissentious numbers pestering streets than seepester (v.)
old form: pestring
obstructing, crowding, clogging
Cor IV.vi.7
Our Tradesmen singing in their shops, and goingOur tradesmen singing in their shops and going Cor IV.vi.8
About their Functions friendly.About their functions friendly.function (n.)office, occupation, callingCor IV.vi.9
Bru. BRUTUS 
We stood too't in good time.We stood to't in good time. Cor IV.vi.10.1
Enter Menenius.Enter Meneniusstand to it (v.)
old form: too
be steadfast, stand firm, make a stand
Cor IV.vi.10
time, in goodat the right moment
Is this Menenius?Is this Menenius? Cor IV.vi.10.2
Sicin. SICINIUS 
'Tis he, 'tis he: O he is grown most kind'Tis he,'tis he. O, he is grown most kind Cor IV.vi.11
of late: / Haile Sir.Of late. Hail, sir! Cor IV.vi.12.1
Mene.MENENIUS 
Haile to you both.Hail to you both! Cor IV.vi.12.2
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Your Coriolanus is not much mist,Your Coriolanus is not much missed Cor IV.vi.13
but with his / Friends: the Commonwealth doth stand,But with his friends. The commonwealth doth stand, Cor IV.vi.14
and so would do, were he more angry at it.And so would do, were he more angry at it. Cor IV.vi.15
Mene. MENENIUS 
All's well, and might haue bene much better, ifAll's well, and might have been much better if Cor IV.vi.16
he could haue temporiz'd.He could have temporized.temporize (v.)
old form: temporiz'd
compromise, conform, become amenable
Cor IV.vi.17.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Where is he, heare you?Where is he, hear you? Cor IV.vi.17.2
Mene. MENENIUS 
Nay I heare nothing: / His Mother and his wife,Nay, I hear nothing. His mother and his wife Cor IV.vi.18
heare nothing from him.Hear nothing from him. Cor IV.vi.19
Enter three or foure Citizens.Enter three or four Citizens Cor IV.vi.20
All. CITIZENS 
The Gods preserue you both.The gods preserve you both! Cor IV.vi.20.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Gooden our Neighbours.Good-e'en, our neighbours. Cor IV.vi.20.2
Bru. BRUTUS 
Gooden to you all, gooden to you all.Good-e'en to you all, good-e'en to you all. Cor IV.vi.21
1 FIRST CITIZEN 
Our selues, our wiues, and children, on our knees,Ourselves, our wives and children, on our knees Cor IV.vi.22
Are bound to pray for you both.Are bound to pray for you both. Cor IV.vi.23.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Liue, and thriue.Live and thrive! Cor IV.vi.23.2
Bru. BRUTUS 
Farewell kinde Neighbours: / We wisht Coriolanus Farewell, kind neighbours. We wished Coriolanus Cor IV.vi.24
had lou'd you as we did.Had loved you as we did. Cor IV.vi.25.1
All. CITIZENS 
Now the Gods keepe you.Now the gods keep you! Cor IV.vi.25.2
Both Tri. BOTH TRIBUNES 
Farewell, farewell. Farewell, farewell. Cor IV.vi.26
Exeunt CitizensExeunt Citizens Cor IV.vi.26
Sicin. SICINIUS 
This is a happier and more comely time,This is a happier and more comely timecomely (adj.)graceful, becoming, decentCor IV.vi.27
Then when these Fellowes ran about the streets,Than when these fellows ran about the streets, Cor IV.vi.28
Crying Confusion.Crying confusion. Cor IV.vi.29.1
Bru. BRUTUS 
Caius Martius wasCaius Martius was Cor IV.vi.29.2
A worthy Officer i'th' Warre, but Insolent,A worthy officer i'th' war, but insolent, Cor IV.vi.30
O'recome with Pride, Ambitious, past all thinkingO'ercome with pride, ambitious past all thinking, Cor IV.vi.31
Selfe-louing.Self-loving – affect (v.)incline to, like, favour, be drawn toCor IV.vi.32.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
And affecting one sole Throne,And affecting one sole throne Cor IV.vi.32.2
without assistãceWithout assistance.assistance (n.)
old form: assistāce
associates, partners, aides
Cor IV.vi.33.1
Mene. MENENIUS 
I thinke not so.I think not so. Cor IV.vi.33.2
Sicin. SICINIUS 
We should by this, to all our Lamention,We should by this, to all our lamentation, Cor IV.vi.34
If he had gone forth Consull, found it so.If he had gone forth Consul, found it so. Cor IV.vi.35
Bru. BRUTUS 
The Gods haue well preuented it, and RomeThe gods have well prevented it, and Rome Cor IV.vi.36
Sits safe and still, without him.Sits safe and still without him. Cor IV.vi.37.1
Enter an Adile.Enter an Aedile Cor IV.vi.37
Adile. AEDILE 
Worthy Tribunes,Worthy Tribunes, Cor IV.vi.37.2
There is a Slaue whom we haue put in prison,There is a slave, whom we have put in prison, Cor IV.vi.38
Reports the Volces with two seuerall PowersReports the Volsces with two several powerspower (n.)armed force, troops, host, armyCor IV.vi.39
Are entred in the Roman Territories,Are entered in the Roman territories,several (adj.)
old form: seuerall
separate, different, distinct
Cor IV.vi.40
And with the deepest malice of the Warre,And with the deepest malice of the war Cor IV.vi.41
Destroy, what lies before 'em.Destroy what lies before 'em. Cor IV.vi.42.1
Mene. MENENIUS 
'Tis Auffidius,'Tis Aufidius, Cor IV.vi.42.2
Who hearing of our Martius Banishment,Who, hearing of our Martius' banishment, Cor IV.vi.43
Thrusts forth his hornes againe into the worldThrusts forth his horns again into the world, Cor IV.vi.44
Which were In-shell'd, when Martius stood for Rome,Which were inshelled when Martius stood for Rome,inshell (v.)
old form: In-shell'd
draw in, withdraw within a shell
Cor IV.vi.45
stand for (v.)defend, uphold, protect, support
And durst not once peepe out.And durst not once peep out. Cor IV.vi.46
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Come, what talke you of Martius.Come, what talk you of Martius? Cor IV.vi.47
Bru. BRUTUS 
Go see this Rumorer whipt, it cannot be,Go see this rumourer whipped. It cannot be Cor IV.vi.48
The Volces dare breake with vs.The Volsces dare break with us.break (v.)
old form: breake
break one's promise, not keep one's word
Cor IV.vi.49.1
Mene. MENENIUS 
Cannot be?Cannot be! Cor IV.vi.49.2
We haue Record, that very well it can,We have record that very well it can, Cor IV.vi.50
And three examples of the like, hath beeneAnd three examples of the like hath beenlike, thethe sameCor IV.vi.51
Within my Age. But reason with the fellowWithin my age. But reason with the fellowage (n.)whole life, lifetime, daysCor IV.vi.52
reason (v.)talk, speak, converse
Before you punish him, where he heard this,Before you punish him, where he heard this, Cor IV.vi.53
Least you shall chance to whip your Information,Lest you shall chance to whip your informationinformation (n.)source of knowledge, informantCor IV.vi.54
And beate the Messenger, who bids bewareAnd beat the messenger who bids beware Cor IV.vi.55
Of what is to be dreaded.Of what is to be dreaded. Cor IV.vi.56.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Tell not me:Tell not me. Cor IV.vi.56.2
I know this cannot be.I know this cannot be. Cor IV.vi.57.1
Bru. BRUTUS 
Not possible.Not possible. Cor IV.vi.57.2
Enter a Messenger.Enter a Messenger Cor IV.vi.58
Mes. MESSENGER 
The Nobles in great earnestnesse are goingThe nobles in great earnestness are going Cor IV.vi.58
All to the Senate-house: some newes is commingAll to the Senate House. Some news is coming Cor IV.vi.59
That turnes their Countenances.That turns their countenances.countenance (n.)expression, look, faceCor IV.vi.60.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
'Tis this Slaue:'Tis this slave –  Cor IV.vi.60.2
Go whip him fore the peoples eyes: His raising,Go whip him 'fore the people's eyes – his raising,raising (n.)rumour-raising, stirring-up, incitementCor IV.vi.61
Nothing but his report.Nothing but his report. Cor IV.vi.62.1
Mes. MESSENGER 
Yes worthy Sir,Yes, worthy sir, Cor IV.vi.62.2
The Slaues report is seconded, and moreThe slave's report is seconded, and more,second (v.)support, confirm, corroborateCor IV.vi.63
More fearfull is deliuer'd.More fearful is delivered. Cor IV.vi.64.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
What more fearefull?What more fearful? Cor IV.vi.64.2
Mes.MESSENGER 
It is spoke freely out of many mouths,It is spoke freely out of many mouths –  Cor IV.vi.65
How probable I do not know, that MartiusHow probable I do not know – that Martius,probable (adj.)plausible, believable, likely soundingCor IV.vi.66
Ioyn'd with Auffidius, leads a power 'gainst Rome,Joined with Aufidius, leads a power 'gainst Rome,power (n.)armed force, troops, host, armyCor IV.vi.67
And vowes Reuenge as spacious, as betweeneAnd vows revenge as spacious as between Cor IV.vi.68
The yong'st and oldest thing.The young'st and oldest thing. Cor IV.vi.69.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
This is most likely.This is most likely! Cor IV.vi.69.2
Bru. BRUTUS 
Rais'd onely, that the weaker sort may wishRaised only that the weaker sort may wish Cor IV.vi.70
Good Martius home againe.Good Martius home again. Cor IV.vi.71.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
The very tricke on't.The very trick on't. Cor IV.vi.71.2
Mene. MENENIUS 
This is vnlikely,This is unlikely. Cor IV.vi.72
He, and Auffidius can no more attoneHe and Aufidius can no more atoneatone (v.)
old form: attone
unite, join, reconcile
Cor IV.vi.73
Then violent'st Contrariety.Than violent'st contrariety.contrariety (n.)oppositeness, contrariness, antagonismCor IV.vi.74
violent (adj.)
old form: violent'st
extreme, intense, utmost
Enter Messenger.Enter a second Messenger Cor IV.vi.75
Mes. SECOND MESSENGER 
You are sent for to the Senate:You are sent for to the Senate. Cor IV.vi.75
A fearefull Army, led by Caius Martius,A fearful army, led by Caius Martius Cor IV.vi.76
Associated with Auffidius, RagesAssociated with Aufidius, ragesassociate (v.)accompany, escort, join withCor IV.vi.77
Vpon our Territories, and haue alreadyUpon our territories, and have already Cor IV.vi.78
O're-borne their way, consum'd with fire, and tookeO'erborne their way, consumed with fire and tookoverbear (v.)
old form: O're-borne
overwhelm, overcome, overpower
Cor IV.vi.79
What lay before them.What lay before them. Cor IV.vi.80
Enter Cominius.Enter Cominius Cor IV.vi.81
Com. COMINIUS 
Oh you haue made good worke.O, you have made good work! Cor IV.vi.81.1
Mene. MENENIUS 
What newes? What newes?What news? What news? Cor IV.vi.81.2
Com. COMINIUS 
You haue holp to rauish your owne daughters, &You have holp to ravish your own daughters and Cor IV.vi.82
To melt the Citty Leades vpon your pates,To melt the city leads upon your pates,pate (n.)head, skullCor IV.vi.83
lead (n.)
old form: Leades
(plural) lead-covered flat roofs
To see your Wiues dishonour'd to your Noses.To see your wives dishonoured to your noses –  Cor IV.vi.84
Mene. MENENIUS 
What's the newes? What's the newes?What's the news? What's the news? Cor IV.vi.85
Com. COMINIUS 
Your Temples burned in their Ciment, and – Your temples burned in their cement, and Cor IV.vi.86
Your Franchises, whereon you stood, confin'dYour franchises, whereon you stood, confinedfranchise (n.)right, liberty, freedomCor IV.vi.87
Into an Augors boare.Into an auger's bore.bore (n.)
old form: boare
bore-hole, auger hole
Cor IV.vi.88.1
Mene. MENENIUS 
Pray now, your Newes:Pray now, your news? –  Cor IV.vi.88.2
You haue made faire worke I feare me: pray your newes,You have made fair work, I fear me. – Pray, your news? –  Cor IV.vi.89
If Martius should be ioyn'd with Volceans.If Martius should be joined wi'th' Volscians –  Cor IV.vi.90.1
Com. COMINIUS 
If?If? Cor IV.vi.90.2
He is their God, he leads them like a thingHe is their god. He leads them like a thing Cor IV.vi.91
Made by some other Deity then Nature,Made by some other deity than Nature, Cor IV.vi.92
That shapes man Better: and they follow himThat shapes man better; and they follow him Cor IV.vi.93
Against vs Brats, with no lesse Confidence,Against us brats with no less confidence Cor IV.vi.94
Then Boyes pursuing Summer Butter-flies,Than boys pursuing summer butterflies, Cor IV.vi.95
Or Butchers killing Flyes.Or butchers killing flies. Cor IV.vi.96.1
Mene. MENENIUS 
You haue made good worke,You have made good work, Cor IV.vi.96.2
You and your Apron men: you, that stood so muchYou and your apron-men, you that stood so up muchapron-man (n.)
old form: Apron men
aproned worker, tradesman
Cor IV.vi.97
Vpon the voyce of occupation, andUpon the voice of occupation andoccupation (n.)handicraft, trade, employmentCor IV.vi.98
voice (n.)
old form: voyce
vote, official support
The breath of Garlicke-eaters.The breath of garlic-eaters! Cor IV.vi.99
Com. COMINIUS 
Hee'l shake your Rome about your eares.He'll shake your Rome about your ears. Cor IV.vi.100
Mene. MENENIUS 
As Hercules did shake downe Mellow Fruite:As Hercules did shake down mellow fruit.Hercules (n.)[Roman form of Heracles] proverbial for his mythical physical strength and miraculous achievementsCor IV.vi.101
You haue made faire worke.You have made fair work! Cor IV.vi.102
Brut. BRUTUS 
But is this true sir?But is this true, sir? Cor IV.vi.103.1
Com, COMINIUS 
I, and you'l looke paleAy; and you'll look pale Cor IV.vi.103.2
Before you finde it other. All the RegionsBefore you find it other. All the regions Cor IV.vi.104
Do smilingly Reuolt, and who resistsDo smilingly revolt, and who resists Cor IV.vi.105
Are mock'd for valiant Ignorance,Are mocked for valiant ignorance,ignorance (n.)negligence, obtuseness, lack of understandingCor IV.vi.106
And perish constant Fooles: who is't can blame him?And perish constant fools. Who is't can blame him?constant (adj.)faithful, steadfast, trueCor IV.vi.107
Your Enemies and his, finde something in him.Your enemies and his find something in him. Cor IV.vi.108
Mene. MENENIUS 
We are all vndone, vnlesseWe are all undone unlessundo (v.)ruin, destroy, wipe outCor IV.vi.109
undone (adj.)
old form: vndone
ruined, destroyed, brought down
The Noble man haue mercy.The noble man have mercy. Cor IV.vi.110.1
Com. COMINIUS 
Who shall aske it?Who shall ask it? Cor IV.vi.110.2
The Tribunes cannot doo't for shame; the peopleThe Tribunes cannot do't for shame; the people Cor IV.vi.111
Deserue such pitty of him, as the WolfeDeserve such pity of him as the wolf Cor IV.vi.112
Doe's of the Shepheards: For his best Friends, if theyDoes of the shepherds. For his best friends, if they Cor IV.vi.113
Should say be good to Rome, they charg'd him, euenShould say ‘ Be good to Rome,’ they charged him evencharge (v.)
old form: charg'd
entreat, exhort, enjoin
Cor IV.vi.114
As those should do that had deseru'd his hate,As those should do that had deserved his hate, Cor IV.vi.115
And therein shew'd like Enemies.And therein showed like enemies.show (v.)
old form: shew'd
appear, look [like], present [as]
Cor IV.vi.116.1
Me. MENENIUS 
'Tis true,'Tis true. Cor IV.vi.116.2
if he were putting to my house, the brandIf he were putting to my house the brand Cor IV.vi.117
That should consume it, I haue not the faceThat should consume it, I have not the face Cor IV.vi.118
To say, beseech you cease. You haue made faire hands,To say ‘ Beseech you, cease.’ You have made fair hands,hand (n.)handiwork, job, workCor IV.vi.119
fair (adj.)
old form: faire
fine, pleasing, splendid, excellent
You and your Crafts, you haue crafted faire.You and your crafts! You have crafted fair!craft (v.)carry out a craft; also: act craftilyCor IV.vi.120.1
Com. COMINIUS 
You haue broughtYou have brought Cor IV.vi.120.2
A Trembling vpon Rome, such as was neuerA trembling upon Rome, such as was never Cor IV.vi.121
S'incapeable of helpe.S'incapable of help. Cor IV.vi.122.1
Tri. TRIBUNES 
Say not, we brought it.Say not we brought it. Cor IV.vi.122.2
Mene. MENENIUS 
How? Was't we? We lou'd him, / But like Beasts,How? Was't we? We loved him, but, like beasts Cor IV.vi.123
and Cowardly Nobles, / Gaue way vnto your Clusters,And cowardly nobles, gave way unto your clusters,cluster (n.)crowd, mob, throngCor IV.vi.124
who did hoote / Him out o'th' Citty.Who did hoot him out o'th' city. Cor IV.vi.125.1
Com. COMINIUS 
But I feareBut I fear Cor IV.vi.125.2
They'l roare him in againe. Tullus Auffidius,They'll roar him in again. Tullus Aufidius, Cor IV.vi.126
The second name of men, obeyes his pointsThe second name of men, obeys his pointsname (n.)famous name, luminary, celebrityCor IV.vi.127
point (n.)decision, conclusion, direction
As if he were his Officer: Desperation,As if he were his officer. Desperation Cor IV.vi.128
Is all the Policy, Strength, and DefenceIs all the policy, strength, and defence, Cor IV.vi.129
That Rome can make against them.That Rome can make against them. Cor IV.vi.130.1
Enter a Troope of Citizens.Enter a troop of Citizenscluster (n.)crowd, mob, throngCor IV.vi.130
Mene. MENENIUS 
Heere come the Clusters.Here come the clusters. Cor IV.vi.130.2
And is Auffidius with him? You are theyAnd is Aufidius with him? You are they Cor IV.vi.131
That made the Ayre vnwholsome, when you castThat made the air unwholesome when you castunwholesome (adj.)
old form: vnwholsome
harmful, damaging, noxious
Cor IV.vi.132
Your stinking, greasie Caps, in hootingYour stinking greasy caps in hooting Cor IV.vi.133
At Coriolanus Exile. Now he's comming,At Coriolanus' exile. Now he's coming, Cor IV.vi.134
And not a haire vpon a Souldiers headAnd not a hair upon a soldier's head Cor IV.vi.135
Which will not proue a whip: As many CoxcombesWhich will not prove a whip. As many coxcombscoxcomb (n.)
old form: Coxcombes
fool's head, fool, simpleton
Cor IV.vi.136
As you threw Caps vp, will he tumble downe,As you threw caps up will he tumble down, Cor IV.vi.137
And pay you for your voyces. 'Tis no matter,And pay you for your voices. 'Tis no matter.voice (n.)
old form: voyces
vote, official support
Cor IV.vi.138
If he could burne vs all into one coale,If he could burn us all into one coal,coal (n.)
old form: coale
cinder, piece of charcoal
Cor IV.vi.139
We haue deseru'd it.We have deserved it. Cor IV.vi.140
Omnes. CITIZENS 
Faith, we heare fearfull Newes.Faith, we hear fearful news. Cor IV.vi.141.1
1 Cit. FIRST CITIZEN 
For mine owne part,For mine own part, Cor IV.vi.141.2
When I said banish him, I said 'twas pitty.When I said banish him, I said 'twas pity. Cor IV.vi.142
2 SECOND CITIZEN 
And so did I.And so did I. Cor IV.vi.143
3 THIRD CITIZEN 
And so did I: and to say the truth, soAnd so did I, and, to say the truth, so Cor IV.vi.144
did very many of vs, that we did we did for the best,did very many of us. That we did, we did for the best, Cor IV.vi.145
and though wee willingly consented to his Banishment,and though we willingly consented to his banishment, Cor IV.vi.146
yet it was against our will.yet it was against our will. Cor IV.vi.147
Com. COMINIUS 
Y'are goodly things, you Voyces.Y'are goodly things, you voices!voice (v.)
old form: Voyces
voter, person offering support
Cor IV.vi.148
Mene.MENENIUS 
You haue made good workeYou have made good work, Cor IV.vi.149
You and your cry. Shal's to the Capitoll?You and your cry! Shall's to the Capitol?Capitol (n.)geographical and ceremonial centre of ancient Rome, the seat of governmentCor IV.vi.150
cry (n.)company, pack [as of hounds]
Com. COMINIUS 
Oh I, what else? O, ay, what else? Cor IV.vi.151
Exeunt both. Exeunt both Cor IV.vi.151
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Go Masters get you home, be not dismaid,Go, masters, get you home. Be not dismayed; Cor IV.vi.152
These are a Side, that would be glad to haueThese are a side that would be glad to have Cor IV.vi.153
This true, which they so seeme to feare. Go home,This true which they so seem to fear. Go home, Cor IV.vi.154
And shew no signe of Feare.And show no sign of fear. Cor IV.vi.155
1 Cit. FIRST CITIZEN 
The Gods bee good to vs: Come MastersThe gods be good to us! Come, masters, Cor IV.vi.156
let's home, I euer said we were i'th wrong, when weLet's home. I ever said we were i'th' wrong when we Cor IV.vi.157
banish'd him.banished him. Cor IV.vi.158
2 Cit. SECOND CITIZEN 
So did we all. But come, let's home.So did we all. But come, let's home. Cor IV.vi.159
Exit Cit. Exeunt Citizens Cor IV.vi.159
Bru. BRUTUS 
I do not like this Newes.I do not like this news. Cor IV.vi.160
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Nor I.Nor I. Cor IV.vi.161
Bru. BRUTUS 
Let's to the Capitoll: would halfe my wealthLet's to the Capitol. Would half my wealth Cor IV.vi.162
Would buy this for a lye.Would buy this for a lie! Cor IV.vi.163.1
Sicin. SICINIUS 
Pray let's go. Pray, let's go. Cor IV.vi.163.2
Exeunt Tribunes. Exeunt Tribunes Cor IV.vi.163
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