Measure for Measure
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Enter Lucio, and two other Gentlemen.Enter Lucio and two other Gentlemen MM I.ii.1
Luc. LUCIO 
If the Duke, with the other Dukes, come not toIf the Duke, with the other dukes, come not to MM I.ii.1
composition with the King of Hungary, why then all thecomposition with the King of Hungary, why then all thecomposition (n.)settlement, truce, coming to termsMM I.ii.2
Dukes fall vpon the King.dukes fall upon the King. MM I.ii.3
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
Heauen grant vs its peace, but notHeaven grant us its peace, but not MM I.ii.4
the King of Hungaries.the King of Hungary's! MM I.ii.5
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
Amen.Amen. MM I.ii.6
Luc. LUCIO 
Thou conclud'st like the Sanctimonious Pirat,Thou conclud'st like the sanctimonious pirate, MM I.ii.7
that went to sea with the ten Commandements, butthat went to sea with the Ten Commandments, but MM I.ii.8
scrap'd one out of the Table.scraped one out of the table. MM I.ii.9
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
Thou shalt not Steale?‘ Thou shalt not steal ’? MM I.ii.10
Luc. LUCIO 
I, that he raz'd.Ay, that he razed.raze, raze out
old form: raz'd
erase, obliterate, wipe out
MM I.ii.11
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
Why? 'twas a commandement, toWhy, 'twas a commandment to MM I.ii.12
command the Captaine and all the rest from their functions:command the captain and all the rest from their functions. MM I.ii.13
they put forth to steale: There's not a Souldier ofThey put forth to steal. There's not a soldier of MM I.ii.14
vs all, that in the thanks-giuing before meate, do rallish theus all that, in the thanksgiving before meat, do relish the MM I.ii.15
petition well, that praies for peace.petition well that prays for peace. MM I.ii.16
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
I neuer heard any Souldier dislike it.I never heard any soldier dislike it. MM I.ii.17
Luc. LUCIO 
I beleeue thee: for I thinke thou neuer was't whereI believe thee, for I think thou never wast where MM I.ii.18
Grace was said.grace was said. MM I.ii.19
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
No? a dozen times at least.No? A dozen times at least. MM I.ii.20
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
What? In meeter?What? In metre? MM I.ii.21
Luc. LUCIO 
In any proportion. or in any language.In any proportion, or in any language. MM I.ii.22
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
I thinke, or in any Religion.I think, or in any religion. MM I.ii.23
Luc. LUCIO 
I, why not? Grace, is Grace, despight of allAy, why not? Grace is grace, despite of all MM I.ii.24
controuersie: as for example; Thou thy selfe art a wickedcontroversy; as, for example, thou thyself art a wicked MM I.ii.25
villaine, despight of all Grace.villain, despite of all grace.despite of (prep.)
old form: despight
in spite of
MM I.ii.26
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
Well: there went but a paire of Well, there went but a pair of MM I.ii.27
sheeres betweene vs.shears between us. MM I.ii.28
Luc. LUCIO 
I grant: as there may betweene the Lists, and theI grant: as there may between the lists and thelist (n.)cloth edging, border materialMM I.ii.29
Veluet. Thou art the List.velvet. Thou art the list. MM I.ii.30
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
And thou the Veluet; thou art goodAnd thou the velvet. Thou art good MM I.ii.31
veluet; thou'rt a three pild-peece I warrant thee: Ivelvet. Thou'rt a three-piled piece, I warrant thee. Ithree-piled (adj.)
old form: three pild
triple-thickness, three-threaded [i.e. very expensive or ornate]
MM I.ii.32
warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirm
had as liefe be a Lyst of an English Kersey, as be pil'd, ashad as lief be a list of an English kersey as be piled, askersey (n./adj.)coarsely woven plain woollen clothMM I.ii.33
lief, had as
old form: liefe
should like just as much
list (n.)
old form: Lyst
cloth edging, border material
thou art pil'd, for a French Veluet. Do I speake feelinglythou art piled, for a French velvet. Do I speak feelinglypilled (adj.)
old form: pil'd
made bald, with hair removed
MM I.ii.34
feelingly (adv.)pertinently, aptly, to the point
velvet (n.)
old form: Veluet
piece of velvet fabric
now?now? MM I.ii.35
Luc. LUCIO 
I thinke thou do'st: and indeed with most painfullI think thou dost, and indeed with most painful MM I.ii.36
feeling of thy speech: I will, out of thine owne confession,feeling of thy speech. I will, out of thine own confession, MM I.ii.37
learne to begin thy health; but, whilst I liue forget tolearn to begin thy health, but, whilst I live, forget to MM I.ii.38
drinke after thee.drink after thee. MM I.ii.39
1. Gen. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
I think I haue done my selfe wrong,I think I have done myself wrong,wrong (n.)dishonour, discredit, harmMM I.ii.40
haue I not?have I not? MM I.ii.41
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
Yes, that thou hast; whether thouYes, that thou hast, whether thou MM I.ii.42
art tainted, or free.art tainted or free.free (adj.)uninfected, free from diseaseMM I.ii.43
tainted (adj.)infected, diseased
Enter Bawde.Enter Mistress Overdone MM I.ii.44
Luc. LUCIO 
Behold, behold, where Madam Mitigation comes.Behold, behold, where Madam Mitigation comes. MM I.ii.44
FIRST GENTLEMAN 
I haue purchas'd as many diseasesI have purchased as many diseases MM I.ii.45
vnder her Roofe, / As come tounder her roof as come to –  MM I.ii.46
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
To what, I pray?To what, I pray? MM I.ii.47
Luc. LUCIO 
Iudge.Judge. MM I.ii.48
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
To three thousand Dollours a yeare.To three thousand dolours a year.dolour (n.)
old form: Dollours
sorrow, grief, lamentation
MM I.ii.49
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
I, and more.Ay, and more. MM I.ii.50
Luc. LUCIO 
A French crowne more.A French crown more.French crownbaldness caused by syphilis [often punning on the French coin]MM I.ii.51
crown (n.)
old form: crowne
coin [usually showing a monarch's crown], English value: 5 shilllings
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
Thou art alwayes figuring diseasesThou art always figuring diseasesfigure (v.)symbolize, represent, portrayMM I.ii.52
in me; but thou art full of error, I am sound.in me, but thou art full of error. I am sound. MM I.ii.53
Luc. LUCIO 
Nay, not (as one would say) healthy: but so sound,Nay, not, as one would say, healthy, but so sound MM I.ii.54
as things that are hollow; thy bones are hollow;as things that are hollow. Thy bones are hollow. MM I.ii.55
Impiety has made a feast of thee.Impiety has made a feast of thee. MM I.ii.56
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
How now, which of your hips hasHow now, which of your hips has MM I.ii.57
the most profound Ciatica?the most profound sciatica? MM I.ii.58
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
Well, well: there's one yonderWell, well; there's one yonder MM I.ii.59
arrested, and carried to prison, was worth fiue thousandarrested and carried to prison was worth five thousand MM I.ii.60
of you all.of you all. MM I.ii.61
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
Who's that I pray'thee?Who's that, I pray thee? MM I.ii.62
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
Marry Sir, that's Claudio, Signior Marry, sir, that's Claudio, Signormarry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryMM I.ii.63
Claudio.Claudio. MM I.ii.64
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
Claudio to prison? 'tis not so.Claudio to prison? 'Tis not so. MM I.ii.65
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
Nay, but I know 'tis so: I saw himNay, but I know 'tis so. I saw him MM I.ii.66
arrested: saw him carried away: and which is more,arrested, saw him carried away, and, which is more, MM I.ii.67
within these three daies his head to be chop'd off.within these three days his head to be chopped off. MM I.ii.68
Luc. LUCIO 
But, after all this fooling, I would not haue it so:But, after all this fooling, I would not have it so. MM I.ii.69
Art thou sure of this?Art thou sure of this? MM I.ii.70
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
I am too sure of it: and it is forI am too sure of it; and it is for MM I.ii.71
getting Madam Iulietta with childe.getting Madam Julietta with child. MM I.ii.72
Luc. LUCIO 
Beleeue me this may be: he promis'd to meete meBelieve me, this may be. He promised to meet me MM I.ii.73
two howres since, and he was euer precise intwo hours since, and he was ever precise in MM I.ii.74
promise keeping.promise-keeping. MM I.ii.75
2. Gent. SECOND GENTLEMAN 
Besides you know, it drawes Besides, you know, it draws MM I.ii.76
somthing neere to the speech we had to such a purpose.something near to the speech we had to such a purpose.purpose (n.)outcome, result, endMM I.ii.77
something (adv.)
old form: somthing
somewhat, rather
1. Gent. FIRST GENTLEMAN 
But most of all agreeing with theBut most of all agreeing with the MM I.ii.78
proclamatiõ.proclamation. MM I.ii.79
Luc. LUCIO 
Away: let's goe learne the truth of it. Away. Let's go learn the truth of it. MM I.ii.80
Exit.Exeunt Lucio and Gentlemen MM I.ii.80
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
Thus, what with the war; whatThus, what with the war, what MM I.ii.81
with the sweat, what with the gallowes, and what withwith the sweat, what with the gallows, and what withsweat (n.)sweating-sickness [type of plague]MM I.ii.82
pouerty, I am Custom-shrunke.poverty, I am custom-shrunk.custom-shrunk (adj.)
old form: Custom-shrunke
down in business, suffering great loss of trade
MM I.ii.83
Enter Clowne.Enter Pompey. A Gaoler and Prisoner pass over the stage MM I.ii.84
How now? what's the newes with you.How now? What's the news with you? MM I.ii.84
Clo. POMPEY 
Yonder man is carried to prison.Yonder man is carried to prison. MM I.ii.85
Baw. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
Well: what has he done?Well, what has he done? MM I.ii.86
Clo. POMPEY 
A Woman.A woman. MM I.ii.87
Baw. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
But what's his offence?But what's his offence? MM I.ii.88
Clo. POMPEY 
Groping for Trowts, in a peculiar Riuer.Groping for trouts in a peculiar river. MM I.ii.89
Baw. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
What? is there a maid with childWhat? Is there a maid with child MM I.ii.90
by him?by him? MM I.ii.91
Clo. POMPEY 
No: but there's a woman with maid by him: youNo, but there's a woman with maid by him. Youmaid (n.)young fishMM I.ii.92
haue not heard of the proclamation, haue you?have not heard of the proclamation, have you? MM I.ii.93
Baw. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
What proclamation, man?What proclamation, man? MM I.ii.94
Clow. POMPEY 
All howses in the Suburbs of Vienna must beeAll houses in the suburbs of Vienna must besuburbs (n.)(plural) parts of a city lying outside the walls [reputed for lawlessness]MM I.ii.95
house (n.)
old form: howses
inn, tavern
pluck'd downe.plucked down. MM I.ii.96
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
And what shall become of thoseAnd what shall become of those MM I.ii.97
in the Citie?in the city? MM I.ii.98
Clow. POMPEY 
They shall stand for seed: they had gon downThey shall stand for seed. They had gone down MM I.ii.99
to, but that a wise Burger put in for them.too, but that a wise burgher put in for them.put in (v.)present a claim, put in a bidMM I.ii.100
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
But shall all our houses of resortBut shall all our houses of resortresort (n.)habitual meeting, regular visitingMM I.ii.101
in the Suburbs be puld downe?in the suburbs be pulled down? MM I.ii.102
Clow. POMPEY 
To the ground, Mistris.To the ground, mistress. MM I.ii.103
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
Why heere's a change indeed inWhy, here's a change indeed in  MM I.ii.104
the Commonwealth: what shall become of me?the commonwealth. What shall become of me? MM I.ii.105
Clow. POMPEY 
Come: feare not you; good Counsellors lacke noCome, fear not you; good counsellors lack no MM I.ii.106
Clients: though you change your place, you neede notclients. Though you change your place, you need notplace (n.)position, post, office, rankMM I.ii.107
change your Trade: Ile bee your Tapster still; courage,change your trade. I'll be your tapster still. Courage,tapster (n.)inn waiter, drawer of aleMM I.ii.108
still (adv.)ever, now [as before]
there will bee pitty taken on you; you that haue worne yourthere will be pity taken on you. You that have worn your MM I.ii.109
eyes almost out in the seruice, you will bee considered.eyes almost out in the service, you will be considered. MM I.ii.110
Bawd. MISTRESS OVERDONE 
What's to doe heere, Thomas Tapster?What's to do here, Thomas Tapster? MM I.ii.111
let's withdraw?Let's withdraw. MM I.ii.112
Clo. POMPEY 
Here comes Signior Claudio, led by the ProuostHere comes Signor Claudio, led by the provost MM I.ii.113
to prison: and there's Madam Iuliet.to prison; and there's Madam Juliet. MM I.ii.114
Exeunt. Exeunt MM I.ii.114
Enter Prouost, Claudio, Iuliet, Officers, Lucio, & Enter Provost, Claudio, Juliet, Officers, Lucio, andprovost (n.)
old form: Prouost
officer in charge of the arrest, custody, and punishment of prisoners
MM I.ii.115.1
2. Gent.two Gentlemen MM I.ii.115.2
Cla. CLAUDIO 
Fellow, why do'st thou show me thus to th' world?Fellow, why dost thou show me thus to th'world? MM I.ii.115
Beare me to prison, where I am committed.Bear me to prison, where I am committed. MM I.ii.116
Pro. PROVOST 
I do it not in euill disposition,I do it not in evil disposition,disposition (n.)inclination, mood, frame of mindMM I.ii.117
But from Lord Angelo by speciall charge.But from Lord Angelo by special charge. MM I.ii.118
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Thus can the demy-god (Authority)Thus can the demigod Authority MM I.ii.119
Make vs pay downe, for our offence, by waightMake us pay down for our offence by weight MM I.ii.120
The words of heauen; on whom it will, it will,The words of heaven. On whom it will, it will; MM I.ii.121
On whom it will not (soe) yet still 'tis iust.On whom it will not, so: yet still 'tis just.still (adv.)constantly, always, continuallyMM I.ii.122
Luc. LUCIO 
Why how now Claudio? whence comes this restraint.Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?restraint (n.)captivity, imprisonment, confinementMM I.ii.123
Cla. CLAUDIO 
From too much liberty, (my Lucio) LibertyFrom too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty. MM I.ii.124
As surfet is the father of much fast,As surfeit is the father of much fast,surfeit (n.)
old form: surfet
excess, over-indulgence
MM I.ii.125
So euery Scope by the immoderate vseSo every scope by the immoderate usescope (n.)opportunity, liberty, free course of actionMM I.ii.126
Turnes to restraint: Our Natures doe pursueTurns to restraint. Our natures do pursue, MM I.ii.127
Like Rats that rauyn downe their proper Bane,Like rats that ravin down their proper bane,proper (adj.)special, particular, specificMM I.ii.128
ravin down (v.)
old form: rauyn downe
gobble ravenously, devour voraciously
bane (n.)poison [from ‘ratsbane’]
A thirsty euill, and when we drinke, we die.A thirsty evil, and when we drink we die. MM I.ii.129
Luc. LUCIO 
If I could speake so wisely vnder an arrest, I would If I could speak so wisely under an arrest, I would MM I.ii.130
send for certaine of my Creditors: and yet, to say thesend for certain of my creditors. And yet, to say the MM I.ii.131
truth, I had as lief haue the foppery of freedome, astruth, I had as lief have the foppery of freedom asfoppery (n.)folly, foolishness, stupidityMM I.ii.132
lief, had asshould like just as much
the mortality of imprisonment: what's thy offence,the morality of imprisonment. What's thy offence,mortality (n.)deadliness, mortification, deadly situationMM I.ii.133
Claudio?Claudio? MM I.ii.134
Cla. CLAUDIO 
What (but to speake of) would offend againe.What but to speak of would offend again. MM I.ii.135
Luc. LUCIO 
What, is't murder?What, is't murder? MM I.ii.136
Cla. CLAUDIO 
No.No. MM I.ii.137
Luc. LUCIO 
Lecherie?Lechery? MM I.ii.138
Cla. CLAUDIO 
Call it so.Call it so. MM I.ii.139
Pro. PROVOST 
Away, Sir, you must goe.Away, sir, you must go. MM I.ii.140
Cla. CLAUDIO 
One word, good friend: / Lucio, a word with you.One word, good friend. Lucio, a word with you. MM I.ii.141
Luc. LUCIO 
A hundred: / If they'll doe you any good:A hundred, if they'll do you any good. MM I.ii.142
Is Lechery so look'd after?Is lechery so looked after?look after (v.)
old form: look'd
watch closely, keep an eye on, police
MM I.ii.143
Cla. CLAUDIO 
Thus stands it with me: vpon a true contractThus stands it with me: upon a true contract MM I.ii.144
I got possession of Iulietas bed,I got possession of Julietta's bed. MM I.ii.145
You know the Lady, she is fast my wife,You know the lady. She is fast my wifefast (adj.)bound, assured, promisedMM I.ii.146
Saue that we doe the denunciation lackeSave that we do the denunciation lackdenunciation (n.)proclamation, public announcement, official declarationMM I.ii.147
Of outward Order. This we came not to,Of outward order. This we came not to,order (n.)prescribed practice, regular procedureMM I.ii.148
outward (adj.)formal, official, public
Onely for propogation of a DowreOnly for propagation of a dowerpropagation (n.)
old form: propogation
enlargement, increasing in extent
MM I.ii.149
dower (n.)
old form: Dowre
dowry, property or wealth given with a wife
Remaining in the Coffer of her friends,Remaining in the coffer of her friends, MM I.ii.150
From whom we thought it meet to hide our LoueFrom whom we thought it meet to hide our lovemeet (adj.)fit, suitable, right, properMM I.ii.151
Till Time had made them for vs. But it chancesTill time had made them for us. But it chanceschance (v.)happen [to], transpire, come aboutMM I.ii.152
The stealth of our most mutuall entertainmentThe stealth of our most mutual entertainmentstealth (n.)stealing away, furtive journey, clandestine actMM I.ii.153
With Character too grosse, is writ on Iuliet.With character too gross is writ on Juliet.character (n.)distinctive sign, stamp, traitMM I.ii.154
gross (adj.)
old form: grosse
plain, striking, evident, obvious
Luc. LUCIO 
With childe, perhaps?With child, perhaps? MM I.ii.155.1
Cla. CLAUDIO 
Vnhappely, euen so.Unhappily, even so. MM I.ii.155.2
And the new Deputie, now for the Duke,And the new deputy now for the Duke –  MM I.ii.156
Whether it be the fault and glimpse of newnes,Whether it be the fault and glimpse of newness, MM I.ii.157
Or whether that the body publique, beOr whether that the body public be MM I.ii.158
A horse whereon the Gouernor doth ride,A horse whereon the governor doth ride, MM I.ii.159
Who newly in the Seate, that it may knowWho, newly in the seat, that it may know MM I.ii.160
He can command; lets it strait feele the spur:He can command, lets it straight feel the spur;straight (adv.)
old form: strait
straightaway, immediately, at once
MM I.ii.161
Whether the Tirranny be in his place,Whether the tyranny be in his place,place (n.)position, post, office, rankMM I.ii.162
Or in his Eminence that fills it vpOr in his eminence that fills it up, MM I.ii.163
I stagger in: But this new GouernorI stagger in – but this new governorstagger (v.)hesitate, waver, vacillateMM I.ii.164
Awakes me all the inrolled penaltiesAwakes me all the enrolled penaltiesenrolled (adj.)
old form: inrolled
recorded, registered, legally entered
MM I.ii.165
Which haue (like vn-scowr'd Armor) hung by th' wallWhich have, like unscoured armour, hung by th' wall MM I.ii.166
So long, that ninteene Zodiacks haue gone round,So long that nineteen zodiacs have gone roundzodiac (n.)
old form: Zodiacks
year, calendar course of the zodiac
MM I.ii.167
And none of them beene worne; and for a nameAnd none of them been worn, and, for a name MM I.ii.168
Now puts the drowsie and neglected ActNow puts the drowsy and neglected act MM I.ii.169
Freshly on me: 'tis surely for a name.Freshly on me. 'Tis surely for a name.name (n.)reputation, fame, renownMM I.ii.170
Luc. LUCIO 
I warrant it is: And thy head stands so tickle on thy I warrant it is, an thy head stands so tickle on thytickle (adv.)insecurely, precariously, unstablyMM I.ii.171
warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirm
shoulders, that a milke-maid, if she be in loue, may sigh itshoulders that a milkmaid, if she be in love, may sigh it MM I.ii.172
off: Send after the Duke, and appeale to him.off. Send after the Duke and appeal to him. MM I.ii.173
Cla. CLAUDIO 
I haue done so, but hee's not to be found.I have done so, but he's not to be found. MM I.ii.174
I pre'thee ( Lucio) doe me this kinde seruice:I prithee, Lucio, do me this kind service; MM I.ii.175
This day, my sister should the Cloyster enter,This day my sister should the cloister enter, MM I.ii.176
And there receiue her approbation.And there receive her approbation.approbation (n.)acceptance as a novice, probationary periodMM I.ii.177
Acquaint her with the danger of my state,Acquaint her with the danger of my state, MM I.ii.178
Implore her, in my voice, that she make friendsImplore her, in my voice, that she make friends MM I.ii.179
To the strict deputie: bid her selfe assay him,To the strict deputy, bid herself assay him.assay (v.)make advances to, accost, address proposals toMM I.ii.180
I haue great hope in that: for in her youthI have great hope in that, for in her youth MM I.ii.181
There is a prone and speechlesse dialect,There is a prone and speechless dialect,prone (adj.)submissive, vulnerable, docileMM I.ii.182
dialect (n.)language, manner of speaking
Such as moue men: beside, she hath prosperous ArtSuch as move men; beside, she hath prosperous artart (n.)rhetorical art, verbal artistryMM I.ii.183
When she will play with reason, and discourse,When she will play with reason and discourse,reason (n.)observation, remark, pointMM I.ii.184
discourse (n.)conversation, talk, chat
And well she can perswade.And well she can persuade. MM I.ii.185
Luc. LUCIO 
I pray shee may; aswell for the encouragement of theI pray she may, as well for the encouragement of thelike, thethe sameMM I.ii.186
like, which else would stand vnder greeuous imposition:like, which else would stand under grievous imposition,imposition (n.)accusation, charge, imputationMM I.ii.187
as for the enioying of thy life, who I would be sorry as for the enjoying of thy life, who I would be sorry MM I.ii.188
should bee thus foolishly lost, at a game of ticke-tacke:should be thus foolishly lost at a game of tick-tack.tick-tack (n.)
old form: ticke-
type of backgammon in which scoring is by placing pegs in holes
MM I.ii.189
Ile to her.I'll to her. MM I.ii.190
Cla. CLAUDIO 
I thanke you good friend Lucio.I thank you, good friend Lucio. MM I.ii.191
Luc. LUCIO 
Within two houres.Within two hours. MM I.ii.192.1
Cla.CLAUDIO 
Come Officer, away. Come, officer, away. MM I.ii.192.2
Exeunt.Exeunt MM I.ii.192
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