The Merchant of Venice
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Enter the Maskers, Gratiano and Salino.Enter the masquers, Gratiano and Salerio MV II.vi.1.1
Gra. GRATIANO 
This is the penthouse vnder which LorenzoThis is the penthouse under which Lorenzopenthouse, pent-house (n.)covered way, sloping porch, overhanging roofMV II.vi.1
Desired vs to make a stand.Desired us to make stand. MV II.vi.2.1
Sal. SALERIO 
His houre is almost past.His hour is almost past.hour (n.)[time of] appointment, engagement, meetingMV II.vi.2.2
Gra. GRATIANO 
And it is meruaile he out-dwels his houre,And it is marvel he outdwells his hour,outdwell (v.)
old form: out-dwels
stay beyond
MV II.vi.3
For louers euer run before the clocke.For lovers ever run before the clock. MV II.vi.4
Sal. SALERIO 
O ten times faster Venus Pidgions flyeO ten times faster Venus' pigeons flyVenus (n.)Roman goddess of beauty and loveMV II.vi.5
To steale loues bonds new made, then they are wontTo seal love's bonds new-made than they are wontwont (v.)be accustomed, used [to], be in the habit ofMV II.vi.6
To keepe obliged faith vnforfaited.To keep obliged faith unforfeited!obliged (adj.)contracted, bound by marriageMV II.vi.7
unforfeited (adj.)
old form: vnforfaited
unviolated, unbroken
Gra. GRATIANO 
That euer holds, who riseth from a feastThat ever holds. Who riseth from a feast MV II.vi.8
With that keene appetite that he sits downe?With that keen appetite that he sits down? MV II.vi.9
Where is the horse that doth vntread againeWhere is the horse that doth untread againuntread (v.)
old form: vntread
retrace, go back upon
MV II.vi.10
His tedious measures with the vnbated fire,His tedious measures with the unbated firemeasure (n.)pattern of movement, regular course, routineMV II.vi.11
unbated (adj.)
old form: vnbated
unabated, undiminished, fresh
That he did pace them first: all things that are,That he did pace them first? All things that are MV II.vi.12
Are with more spirit chased then enioy'd.Are with more spirit chased than enjoyed. MV II.vi.13
How like a yonger or a prodigallHow like a younger or a prodigalyounger (n.)
old form: yonger
younger son
MV II.vi.14
prodigal (n.)
old form: prodigall
waster, squanderer, spendthrift
The skarfed barke puts from her natiue bay,The scarfed bark puts from her native bay,bark, barque (n.)
old form: barke
ship, vessel
MV II.vi.15
scarfed (adj.)
old form: skarfed
[unclear meaning] fully decked out; under full sail; [of the hull] well-jointed
Hudg'd and embraced by the strumpet winde:Hugged and embraced by the strumpet wind.strumpet (n.)harlot, prostitute, whoreMV II.vi.16
How like a prodigall doth she returneHow like the prodigal doth she return, MV II.vi.17
With ouer-wither'd ribs and ragged sailes,With overweathered ribs and ragged sails,overweathered (adj.)
old form: ouer-wither'd
weather-worn, storm-damaged
MV II.vi.18
Leane, rent, and begger'd by the strumpet winde?Lean, rent, and beggared by the strumpet wind.beggar (v.)
old form: begger'd
reduce to beggary, impoverish, make destitute
MV II.vi.19
Salino. SALERIO 
Heere comes Lorenzo, more of this hereafter.Here comes Lorenzo; more of this hereafter. MV II.vi.20

Enter Lorenzo MV II.vi.21.1
Lor. LORENZO 
Sweete friends, your patience for my long abode, Sweet friends, your patience for my long abode.abode (n.)delay, procrastinationMV II.vi.21
Not I, but my affaires haue made you wait:Not I but my affairs have made you wait. MV II.vi.22
When you shall please to play the theeues for wiuesWhen you shall please to play the thieves for wives, MV II.vi.23
Ile watch as long for you then: approachI'll watch as long for you then. Approach.watch (v.)keep the watch, keep guard, be on the look-outMV II.vi.24
Here dwels my father Iew. Hoa, who's within?Here dwells my father Jew! Ho! Who's within? MV II.vi.25
Iessica aboue.Enter Jessica above, in boy's clothes MV II.vi.26
Iess. JESSICA 
Who are you? tell me for more certainty,Who are you? Tell me for more certainty, MV II.vi.26
Albeit Ile sweare that I do know your tongue.Albeit I'll swear that I do know your tongue. MV II.vi.27
Lor. LORENZO 
Lorenzo, and thy Loue.Lorenzo, and thy love. MV II.vi.28
Ies. JESSICA 
Lorenzo certaine, and my loue indeed,Lorenzo certain, and my love indeed, MV II.vi.29
For who loue I so much? and now who knowesFor who love I so much? And now who knows MV II.vi.30
But you Lorenzo, whether I am yours?But you, Lorenzo, whether I am yours? MV II.vi.31
Lor. LORENZO 
Heauen and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.Heaven and thy thoughts are witness that thou art. MV II.vi.32
Ies. JESSICA 
Heere, catch this casket, it is worth the paines,Here, catch this casket; it is worth the pains. MV II.vi.33
I am glad 'tis night, you do not looke on me,I am glad 'tis night, you do not look on me, MV II.vi.34
For I am much asham'd of my exchange:For I am much ashamed of my exchange.exchange (n.)transformation, altered appearanceMV II.vi.35
But loue is blinde, and louers cannot seeBut love is blind, and lovers cannot see MV II.vi.36
The pretty follies that themselues commit,The pretty follies that themselves commit;pretty (adj.)clever, ingenious, artfulMV II.vi.37
For if they could, Cupid himselfe would blushFor if they could, Cupid himself would blushCupid (n.)[pron: 'kyoopid] Roman god of love, son of Venus and Mercury; a winged, blindfolded boy with curved bow and arrowsMV II.vi.38
To see me thus transformed to a boy.To see me thus transformed to a boy. MV II.vi.39
Lor. LORENZO 
Descend, for you must be my torch-bearer.Descend, for you must be my torchbearer. MV II.vi.40
Ies. JESSICA 
What, must I hold a Candle to my shames?What, must I hold a candle to my shames? MV II.vi.41
They in themselues goodsooth are too too light.They in themselves, good sooth, are too too light.sooth (n.)truth [in exclamations, emphasizing an assertion]MV II.vi.42
Why, 'tis an office of discouery Loue,Why, 'tis an office of discovery, love,discovery (n.)
old form: discouery
disclosure, admission, revelation
MV II.vi.43
office (n.)role, position, place, function
And I should be obscur'd.And I should be obscured. MV II.vi.44.1
Lor. LORENZO 
So you are sweet,So are you, sweet, MV II.vi.44.2
Euen in the louely garnish of a boy: Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.garnish (n.)outfit, adornment, trimmingMV II.vi.45
but come at once,But come at once, MV II.vi.46
For the close night doth play the run-away,For the close night doth play the runaway,close (adj.)secretive, tight-lipped, uncommunicativeMV II.vi.47
And we are staid for at Bassanio's feast.And we are stayed for at Bassanio's feast. MV II.vi.48
Ies. JESSICA 
I will make fast the doores and guild my selfeI will make fast the doors, and gild myselfgild (v.), past forms gilt, gilded
old form: guild
supply with money, enrich
MV II.vi.49
With some more ducats, and be with you straight.With some more ducats, and be with you straight.ducat (n.)gold (sometimes silver) coin used in several European countriesMV II.vi.50
straight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at once

Exit above MV II.vi.50
Gra. GRATIANO 
Now by my hood, a gentle, and no Iew.Now by my hood, a gentle and no Jew!hood (n.)[unclear meaning] head-covering, bonnet, maskMV II.vi.51
gentle (n.)[polite intimate address] dear one
Lor. LORENZO 
Beshrew me but I loue her heartily.Beshrew me but I love her heartily!beshrew, 'shrew (v.)curse, devil take, evil befallMV II.vi.52
For she is wise, if I can iudge of her,For she is wise, if I can judge of her, MV II.vi.53
And faire she is, if that mine eyes be true,And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true, MV II.vi.54
And true she is, as she hath prou'd her selfe:And true she is, as she hath proved herself;true (adj.)constant, faithful in loveMV II.vi.55
And therefore like her selfe, wise, faire, and true,And therefore, like herself, wise, fair, and true, MV II.vi.56
Shall she be placed in my constant soule.Shall she be placed in my constant soul. MV II.vi.57
Enter Iessica.Enter Jessica below MV II.vi.58
What, art thou come? on gentlemen, away,What, art thou come? On, gentlemen, away! MV II.vi.58
Our masking mates by this time for vs stay. Our masquing mates by this time for us stay. MV II.vi.59
Exit. Exit with Jessica and Salerio MV II.vi.59
Enter Anthonio.Enter Antonio MV II.vi.59
Ant. ANTONIO 
Who's there?Who's there? MV II.vi.60
Gra. GRATIANO 
Signior Anthonio?Signor Antonio? MV II.vi.61
Ant. ANTONIO 
Fie, fie, Gratiano, where are all the rest?Fie, fie, Gratiano! Where are all the rest? MV II.vi.62
'Tis nine a clocke, our friends all stay for you,'Tis nine o'clock; our friends all stay for you. MV II.vi.63
No maske to night, the winde is come about,No masque tonight. The wind is come about;come about (v.)change direction, veer roundMV II.vi.64
Bassanio presently will goe aboord,Bassanio presently will go aboard.presently (adv.)immediately, instantly, at onceMV II.vi.65
I haue sent twenty out to seeke for you.I have sent twenty out to seek for you. MV II.vi.66
Gra. GRATIANO 
I am glad on't, I desire no more delightI am glad on't. I desire no more delight MV II.vi.67
Then to be vnder saile, and gone to night.Than to be under sail and gone tonight. MV II.vi.68
ExeuntExeunt MV II.vi.68
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