Troilus and Cressida
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Musicke sounds within. Enter Pandarus and a Seruant.Music sounds within. Enter Pandarus and a Servant TC III.i.1
Pan. PANDARUS 
Friend, you, pray you a word: Doe not you Friend, you, pray you, a word: do not you TC III.i.1
follow the yong Lord Paris?follow the young Lord Paris? TC III.i.2
Ser. SERVANT 
I sir, when he goes before me.Ay, sir, when he goes before me. TC III.i.3
Pan. PANDARUS 
You depend vpon him I meane?You depend upon him, I mean.depend on / upon (v.)
old form: vpon
serve, wait on, be a dependant of
TC III.i.4
Ser. SERVANT 
Sir, I doe depend vpon the Lord.Sir, I do depend upon the Lord. TC III.i.5
Pan. PANDARUS 
You depend vpon a noble Gentleman: I mustYou depend upon a noble gentleman; I must TC III.i.6
needes praise him.needs praise him. TC III.i.7
Ser. SERVANT 
The Lord be praised.The Lord be praised! TC III.i.8
Pa. PANDARUS 
You know me, doe you not?You know me, do you not? TC III.i.9
Ser. SERVANT 
Faith sir, superficially.Faith, sir, superficially. TC III.i.10
Pa. PANDARUS 
Friend know me better, I am the Lord Friend, know me better: I am the Lord TC III.i.11
Pandarus.Pandarus. TC III.i.12
Ser. SERVANT 
I hope I shall know your honour better.I hope I shall know your honour better. TC III.i.13
Pa. PANDARUS 
I doe desire it.I do desire it. TC III.i.14
Ser. SERVANT 
You are in the state of Grace?You are in the state of grace?grace (n.)means of salvation, divine favourTC III.i.15
Pa. PANDARUS 
Grace, not so friend, honor and Lordship Grace? Not so, friend; honour and lordship TC III.i.16
are my title: What Musique is this?are my titles. What music is this? TC III.i.17
Ser. SERVANT 
I doe but partly know sir: it is Musicke in parts.I do but partly know, sir: it is music in parts.partly (adv.)slightly, in some measure, a littleTC III.i.18
Pa. PANDARUS 
Know you the Musitians.Know you the musicians? TC III.i.19
Ser. SERVANT 
Wholly sir.Wholly, sir. TC III.i.20
Pa. PANDARUS 
Who play they to?Who play they to? TC III.i.21
Ser. SERVANT 
To the hearers sir.To the hearers, sir. TC III.i.22
Pa. PANDARUS 
At whose pleasur friend?At whose pleasure, friend? TC III.i.23
Ser. SERVANT 
At mine sir, and theirs that loue Musicke.At mine, sir, and theirs that love music. TC III.i.24
Pa. PANDARUS 
Command, I meane friend.Command, I mean, friend. TC III.i.25
Ser. SERVANT 
Who shallI command sir?Who shall I command, sir? TC III.i.26
Pa. PANDARUS 
Friend, we vnderstand not one another: I Friend, we understand not one another: I TC III.i.27
am too courtly, and thou art too cunning. At whose am too courtly, and thou art too cunning. At whosecunning (adj.)knowledgeable, skilful, cleverTC III.i.28
request doe these men play?request do these men play? TC III.i.29
Ser. SERVANT 
That's too't indeede sir: marry sir, at the That's to't indeed, sir: marry, sir, at themarry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryTC III.i.30
request of Paris my L. who's there in person; with request of Paris my lord, who's there in person; with TC III.i.31
him the mortall Venus, the heart bloud of beauty, him, the mortal Venus, the heart-blood of beauty,Venus (n.)Roman goddess of beauty and loveTC III.i.32
loues inuisible soule.love's visible soul –  TC III.i.33
Pa. PANDARUS 
Who? my Cosin Cressida.Who, my cousin Cressida? TC III.i.34
Ser. SERVANT 
No sir, Helen, could you not finde out that byNo, sir, Helen; could you not find out that by TC III.i.35
her attributes?her attributes? TC III.i.36
Pa. PANDARUS 
It should seeme fellow, that thou hast notIt should seem, fellow, that thou hast not TC III.i.37
seen the Lady Cressida. I come to speake with Paris seen the Lady Cressida. I come to speak with Paris TC III.i.38
from the Prince Troylus: I will make a complementall from the Prince Troilus. I will make a complimentalcomplimental (adj.)
old form: complementall
ceremonial, courteous, full of compliments
TC III.i.39
assault vpon him, for my businesse seethes.assault upon him, for my business seethes.seethe (v.)boil with urgency, bubble, be in a fermentTC III.i.40
Ser. SERVANT  
(aside) TC III.i.41.1
Sodden businesse, there's a stewed Sodden business! There's a stewedsodden (adj.)boiled, stewed upTC III.i.41
phrase indeede.phrase indeed. TC III.i.42
Enter Paris and Helena.Enter Paris and Helen with attendants TC III.i.43.1
Pan. PANDARUS 
Faire be to you my Lord, and to all this faire Fair be to you, my lord, and to all this fairfair (adj.)
old form: faire
fine, pleasing, splendid, excellent
TC III.i.43
fair (n.)
old form: faire
fortune, happiness, favour
company: faire desires in all faire measure fairely guide company; fair desires, in all fair measure, fairly guidefairly (adv.)
old form: fairely
fully, completely, entirely
TC III.i.44
fair (adj.)
old form: faire
virtuous, honourable, upright
fair (adj.)
old form: faire
appropriate, courteous, pleasing
them, especially to you faire Queene, faire thoughts be them! – especially to you, fair queen: fair thoughts befair (adj.)
old form: faire
handsome, good-looking, beautiful
TC III.i.45
fair (adj.)
old form: faire
good, elegant, fine
your faire pillow.your fair pillow!fair (adj.)
old form: faire
fortunate, favoured
TC III.i.46
Hel. HELEN 
Deere L. you are full of faire words.Dear lord, you are full of fair words.fair (adj.)
old form: faire
plausible, flattering, seductive
TC III.i.47
Pan. PANDARUS 
You speake your faire pleasure sweete Queene:You speak your fair pleasure, sweet queen. – fair (adj.)
old form: faire
appropriate, courteous, pleasing
TC III.i.48
faire Prince, here is good broken Musicke.Fair prince, here is good broken music.broken (adj.)arranged for different groups of instrumentsTC III.i.49
Par. PARIS 
You haue broke it cozen: and by my life you shall You have broke it, cousin: and by my life you shallbreak (v.)interrupt, break in on, cut in onTC III.i.50
make it whole againe, you shall peece it out with a peece make it whole again; you shall piece it out with a piecepiece out (v.)
old form: peece
augment, increase, supplement
TC III.i.51
of your performance. Nel, he is full of harmony.of your performance. – Nell, he is full of harmony. TC III.i.52
Pan. PANDARUS 
Truely Lady no.Truly, lady, no. TC III.i.53
Hel. HELEN 
O sir.O sir –  TC III.i.54
Pan. PANDARUS 
Rude in sooth, in good sooth very rude.Rude, in sooth; in good sooth, very rude.rude (adj.)amateurish, inexpert, lacking polishTC III.i.55
sooth (n.)truth [in exclamations, emphasizing an assertion]
Paris. PARIS 
Well said my Lord: well, you say so in fits.Well said, my lord; well, you say so in fits.fit (n.)spasm, short burstTC III.i.56
Pan. PANDARUS 
I haue businesse to my Lord, deere Queene: myI have business to my lord, dear queen. – My TC III.i.57
Lord will you vouchsafe me a word.lord, will you vouchsafe me a word? TC III.i.58
Hel. HELEN 
Nay, this shall not hedge vs out, weele heare youNay, this shall not hedge us out; we'll hear youhedge out (v.)exclude, keep out, shut outTC III.i.59
sing certainely.sing, certainly. TC III.i.60
Pan. PANDARUS 
Well sweete Queene you are pleasant with me,Well, sweet queen, you are pleasant with me.pleasant (adj.)facetious, joking, drollTC III.i.61
but, marry thus my Lord, my deere Lord, and most – But, marry, thus, my lord: my dear lord, and most TC III.i.62
esteemed friend your brother Troylus.esteemed friend, your brother Troilus –  TC III.i.63
Hel. HELEN 
My Lord Pandarus, hony sweete Lord.My Lord Pandarus, honey-sweet lord –  TC III.i.64
Pan. PANDARUS 
Go too sweete Queene, goe to. / Commends Go to, sweet queen, go to – commendscommend (v.)convey greetings, present kind regardsTC III.i.65
himselfe most affectionately to you.himself most affectionately to you –  TC III.i.66
Hel. HELEN 
You shall not bob vs out of our melody: / If you doe, You shall not bob us out of our melody; if you do,bob (v.)swindle, cheat, get by deceptionTC III.i.67
our melancholly vpon your head.our melancholy upon your head! TC III.i.68
Pan. PANDARUS 
Sweete Queene, sweete Queene, that's a sweeteSweet queen, sweet queen; that's a sweet TC III.i.69
Queene I faith---queen, i'faith –  TC III.i.70
Hel. HELEN 
And to make a sweet Lady sad, is a sower offence.And to make a sweet lady sad is a sour offence.sad (adj.)downcast, distressed, mournful, gloomyTC III.i.71
Pan. PANDARUS 
Nay, that shall not serue your turne, that shall Nay, that shall not serve your turn, that shallserve one's turn
old form: serue turne
meet one's need, answer one's requirements
TC III.i.72
it not in truth la. Nay, I care not for such words, no, it not, in truth, la. Nay, I care not for such words; no,la (int.)indeedTC III.i.73
no. And my Lord he desires you, that if the King call no – and, my lord, he desires you that if the King call TC III.i.74
for him at Supper, you will make his excuse.for him at supper, you will make his excuse. TC III.i.75
Hel. HELEN 
My Lord Pandarus?My Lord Pandarus –  TC III.i.76
Pan. PANDARUS 
What saies my sweete Queene, my very, veryWhat says my sweet queen, my very very TC III.i.77
sweete Queene?sweet queen? TC III.i.78
Par. PARIS 
What exploit's in hand, where sups he to night?What exploit's in hand? Where sups he tonight?sup (v.)have supperTC III.i.79
Hel. HELEN 
Nay but my Lord?Nay, but, my lord –  TC III.i.80
Pan. PANDARUS 
What saies my sweete Queene? my cozen willWhat says my sweet queen? – My cousin will TC III.i.81
fall out with you.fall out with you.  TC III.i.82
Hel. HELEN  
(to Paris) TC III.i.83
You must not know where he sups.You must not know where he sups. TC III.i.83
Par. PARIS 
With my disposer Cressida.I'll lay my life, with my disposer Cressida.disposer (n.)[unclear meaning] one who makes arrangements, one who can handle [a person]TC III.i.84
Pan. PANDARUS 
No, no; no such matter, you are wide, come No, no, no such matter, you are wide; come,wide (adj.)wide of the mark, mistakenTC III.i.85
your disposer is sicke.your disposer is sick. TC III.i.86
Par. PARIS 
Well, Ile make excuse.Well, I'll make excuse. TC III.i.87
Pan. PANDARUS 
I good my Lord: why should you say Ay, good my lord. Why should you say TC III.i.88
Cressida? no, your poore disposer's sicke.Cressida? No, your poor disposer's sick. TC III.i.89
Par. PARIS 
I spie.I spy. TC III.i.90
Pan. PANDARUS 
You spie, what doe you spie: come, giue me You spy? What do you spy? – Come, give me TC III.i.91
an Instrument now sweete Queene.an instrument. – Now, sweet queen. TC III.i.92
Hel. HELEN 
Why this is kindely done?Why, this is kindly done. TC III.i.93
Pan. PANDARUS 
My Neece is horrible in loue with a thing youMy niece is horribly in love with a thing you TC III.i.94
haue sweete Queene.have, sweet queen. TC III.i.95
Hel. HELEN 
She shall haue it my Lord, if it be not my LordShe shall have it, my lord, if it be not my Lord TC III.i.96
Paris.Paris. TC III.i.97
Pand. PANDARUS 
Hee? no, sheele none of him, they two areHe? No, she'll none of him; they two are TC III.i.98
twaine.twain.twain (adv.)
old form: twaine
of separate minds, at variance
TC III.i.99
Hel. HELEN 
Falling in after falling out, may make them Falling in after falling out may make themfalling in (n.)reconciliation, coming togetherTC III.i.100
three.three. TC III.i.101
Pan. PANDARUS 
Come, come, Ile heare no more of this, Ile singCome, come, I'll hear no more of this; I'll TC III.i.102
you a song now.sing you a song now. TC III.i.103
Hel. HELEN 
I, I, prethee now: by my troth sweet Lord thouAy, ay, prithee now. By my troth, sweet lord, thoutroth, by myby my truth [exclamation emphasizing an assertion]TC III.i.104
hast a fine fore-head.hast a fine forehead.forehead (n.)
old form: fore-head
commanding countenance, assurance, audacity
TC III.i.105
Pan. PANDARUS 
I you may, you may.Ay, you may, you may. TC III.i.106
Hel. HELEN 
Let thy song be loue: this loue will vndoe vs al. Oh Let thy song be love; this love will undo us all. O TC III.i.107
Cupid, Cupid, Cupid.Cupid, Cupid, Cupid!Cupid (n.)[pron: 'kyoopid] Roman god of love, son of Venus and Mercury; a winged, blindfolded boy with curved bow and arrowsTC III.i.108
Pan. PANDARUS 
Loue? I that it shall yfaith.Love? Ay, that it shall, i'faith. TC III.i.109
Par. PARIS 
I, good now loue, loue, no thing but loue.Ay, good now, love, love, nothing but love. TC III.i.110
Pan. PANDARUS 
In good troth it begins so.In good troth, it begins so.troth, good troth (n.)exclamations, emphasizing an assertion - truly, indeedTC III.i.111
Loue, loue, no thing but loue, still more:Love, love, nothing but love, still love, still more! TC III.i.112
For O loues Bow,For, O, love's bow TC III.i.113
Shootes Bucke and Doe:Shoots buck and doe; TC III.i.114
The Shaft confounds The shaft confounds,confound (v.)destroy, overthrow, ruinTC III.i.115
not that it wounds,Not that it wounds, TC III.i.116
But tickles still the sore:But tickles still the sore.still (adv.)constantly, always, continuallyTC III.i.117
These Louers cry, oh ho they dye;These lovers cry – O ho, they die! TC III.i.118
Yet that which seemes the wound to kill,Yet that which seems the wound to kill TC III.i.119
Doth turne oh ho, to ha ha he:Doth turn O ho to ha, ha, he! TC III.i.120
So dying loue liues still,So dying love lives still: TC III.i.121
O ho a while, but ha ha ha,O ho, a while, but ha, ha, ha! TC III.i.122
O ho grones out for ha ha ha----hey ho.O ho, groans out for ha, ha, ha! – Heigh ho! TC III.i.123
Hel. HELEN 
In loue yfaith to the very tip of the nose.In love, i'faith, to the very tip of the nose. TC III.i.124
Par. PARIS 
He eates nothing but doues loue, and that breedsHe eats nothing but doves, love, and that breeds TC III.i.125
hot bloud, and hot bloud begets hot thoughts, and hothot blood, and hot blood begets hot thoughts, and hotblood (n.)
old form: bloud
passion, feeling, strong emotion [especially sexual]
TC III.i.126
thoughts beget hot deedes, and hot deedes is loue.thoughts beget hot deeds, and hot deeds is love. TC III.i.127
Pan. PANDARUS 
Is this the generation of loue? Hot bloud, hotIs this the generation of love? Hot blood, hotgeneration (n.)genealogy, line of descentTC III.i.128
hot (adj.)lecherous, lustful, hot-blooded
thoughts, and hot deedes, why they are Vipers, is Loue thoughts, and hot deeds? Why, they are vipers: is love TC III.i.129
a generation of Vipers? / Sweete Lord whose a field a generation of vipers? – Sweet lord, who's a-field TC III.i.130
to day?today? TC III.i.131
Par. PARIS 
Hector, Deiphobus, Helenus, Anthenor, and all Hector, Deiphobus, Helenus, Antenor, and all TC III.i.132
the gallantry of Troy. I would faine haue arm'd to day, the gallantry of Troy. I would fain have armed today,fain (adv.)
old form: faine
gladly, willingly
TC III.i.133
gallantry (n.)gallants, nobility, gentry
but my Nell would not haue it so. / How chance my but my Nell would not have it so. How chance mychance (v.)happen [to], transpire, come aboutTC III.i.134
brother Troylus went not?brother Troilus went not? TC III.i.135
Hel. HELEN 
He hangs the lippe at something; you know allHe hangs the lip at something – you know all,lip, hang the
old form: lippe
look vexed, pout, sulk
TC III.i.136
Lord Pandarus?Lord Pandarus. TC III.i.137
Pan. PANDARUS 
Not I hony sweete Queene: I long to heare Not I, honey-sweet queen; I long to hear TC III.i.138
how they sped to day: / Youle remember your how they sped today. – You'll remember yourspeed (v.)meet with success, prosper, flourishTC III.i.139
brothers excuse?brother's excuse? TC III.i.140
Par. PARIS 
To a hayre.To a hair.hair / hair's breadth, to a
old form: hayre
in every little detail, in full, exactly
TC III.i.141
Pan. PANDARUS 
Farewell sweete Queene.Farewell, sweet queen. TC III.i.142
Hel. HELEN 
Commend me to your Neece.Commend me to your niece.commend (v.)convey greetings, present kind regardsTC III.i.143
Pan. PANDARUS 
I will sweete Queene.I will, sweet queen. TC III.i.144
Exit TC III.i.144
Sounda retreat.Sound a retreatfield (n.)
old form: fielde
field of battle, battleground, field of combat
TC III.i.145
Par. PARIS 
They're come from fielde: let vs to Priams HallThey're come from field; let us to Priam's hall, TC III.i.145.1
To greete the Warriers. Sweet Hellen, I must woe you,To greet the warriors. Sweet Helen, I must woo you TC III.i.146
To helpe vnarme our Hector: his stubborne Buckles,To help unarm our Hector; his stubborn buckles,unarm (v.)
old form: vnarme
disarm, remove armour
TC III.i.147
With these your white enchanting fingers toucht,With these your white enchanting fingers touched, TC III.i.148
Shall more obey then to the edge of Steele,Shall more obey than to the edge of steel TC III.i.149
Or force of Greekish sinewes: you shall doe moreOr force of Greekish sinews. You shall do moresinew (n.)
old form: sinewes
muscle
TC III.i.150
Then all the Iland Kings, disarme great Hector.Than all the island kings – disarm great Hector. TC III.i.151
Hel. HELEN 
'Twill make vs proud to be his seruant Paris:'Twill make us proud to be his servant, Paris; TC III.i.152
Yea what he shall receiue of vs in duetie,Yea, what he shall receive of us in duty TC III.i.153
Giues vs more palme in beautie then we haue:Gives us more palm in beauty than we have,palm (n.)
old form: palme
praise, honour, esteem
TC III.i.154
Yea ouershines our selfe.Yea, overshines ourself. TC III.i.155
PARIS 
Sweete aboue thought I loue thee. Sweet, above thought I love thee. TC III.i.156
Exeunt.Exeunt TC III.i.156
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