Henry VI Part 1
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Enter Charles, Burgundy, Alanson, Bastard,Enter Charles, Burgundy, Alençon, the Bastard, 1H6 V.ii.1.1
Reignier, and Ione.Reignier, and Joan la Pucelle 1H6 V.ii.1.2
Char. CHARLES 
These newes (my Lords) may cheere our drooping spirits:These news, my lords, may cheer our drooping spirits: 1H6 V.ii.1
'Tis said, the stout Parisians do reuolt,'Tis said the stout Parisians do revoltstout (adj.)brave, valiant, resolute1H6 V.ii.2
And turne againe vnto the warlike French.And turn again unto the warlike French. 1H6 V.ii.3
Alan. ALENÇON 
Then march to Paris Royall Charles of France,Then march to Paris, royal Charles of France, 1H6 V.ii.4
And keepe not backe your powers in dalliance.And keep not back your powers in dalliance.dalliance (n.)frivolity, idleness, wasteful activity1H6 V.ii.5
power (n.)armed force, troops, host, army
Pucel. PUCELLE 
Peace be amongst them if they turne to vs,Peace be amongst them if they turn to us; 1H6 V.ii.6
Else ruine combate with their Pallaces.Else ruin combat with their palaces!ruin (n.)
old form: ruine
ruination, destruction, devastation
1H6 V.ii.7
Enter Scout.Enter a Scout 1H6 V.ii.8
Scout. SCOUT 
Successe vnto our valiant Generall,Success unto our valiant general, 1H6 V.ii.8
And happinesse to his accomplices.And happiness to his accomplices!accomplice (n.)associate, partner, aide1H6 V.ii.9
Char.CHARLES 
What tidings send our Scouts? I prethee speak.What tidings send our scouts? I prithee speak. 1H6 V.ii.10
Scout. SCOUT 
The English Army that diuided wasThe English army, that divided was 1H6 V.ii.11
Into two parties, is now conioyn'd in one,Into two parties, is now conjoined in one,conjoin (v.)
old form: conioyn'd
unite, join together
1H6 V.ii.12
And meanes to giue you battell presently.And means to give you battle presently.presently (adv.)after a short time, soon, before long1H6 V.ii.13
Char. CHARLES 
Somewhat too sodaine Sirs, the warning is,Somewhat too sudden, sirs, the warning is, 1H6 V.ii.14
But we will presently prouide for them.But we will presently provide for them. 1H6 V.ii.15
I trust the Ghost of Talbot is not there:I trust the ghost of Talbot is not there. 1H6 V.ii.16
Bur. BURGUNDY 
Now he is gone my Lord, you neede not feare.Now he is gone, my lord, you need not fear. 1H6 V.ii.17
Pucel. PUCELLE 
Of all base passions, Feare is most accurst.Of all base passions fear is most accursed.base (adj.)dishonourable, low, unworthy1H6 V.ii.18
passion (n.)powerful feeling, overpowering emotion [often opposed to ‘reason’]
Command the Conquest Charles, it shall be thine:Command the conquest, Charles, it shall be thine, 1H6 V.ii.19
Let Henry fret, and all the world repine.Let Henry fret and all the world repine.repine (v.)be discontented, complain, feel dissatisfaction1H6 V.ii.20
Char. CHARLES 
Then on my Lords, and France be fortunate.Then on, my lords; and France be fortunate!fortunate (adj.)favoured by fortune, successful1H6 V.ii.21
Exeunt. Exeunt 1H6 V.ii.21
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