The Comedy of Errors
Printer Friendly View
mainCont width actsCont width
mainCont left actsCont left
mainCont right actsCont right
selAct left selAct right
  absolutní levá pozice
  acts cont padding (l/r) 3%

First folio
Modern text

Definitions

Key line

Enter Antipholis Errotis.Enter Antipholus of Syracuse CE II.ii.1
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
The gold I gaue to Dromio is laid vp The gold I gave to Dromio is laid up CE II.ii.1
Safe at the Centaur, and the heedfull slaue Safe at the Centaur, and the heedful slaveslave (n.)
old form: slaue
fellow, rascal, rogue, villain
CE II.ii.2
Is wandred forth in care to seeke me out Is wandered forth in care to seek me outcare (n.)attentiveness, heedfulness, diligenceCE II.ii.3
By computation and mine hosts report. By computation and mine host's report.computation (n.)working out, reasoning, cogitationCE II.ii.4
I could not speake with Dromio, since at first I could not speak with Dromio since at first CE II.ii.5
I sent him from the Mart? see here he comes. I sent him from the mart. See, here he comes.mart (n.)marketCE II.ii.6
Enter Dromio Siracusia.Enter Dromio of Syracusehumour (n.)
old form: humor
mood, disposition, frame of mind, temperament [as determined by bodily fluids]
CE II.ii.7
How now sir, is your merrie humor alter'd? How now, sir. Is your merry humour altered? CE II.ii.7
As you loue stroakes, so iest with me againe: As you love strokes, so jest with me again. CE II.ii.8
You know no Centaur? you receiu'd no gold? You know no Centaur. You received no gold. CE II.ii.9
Your Mistresse sent to haue me home to dinner? Your mistress sent to have me home to dinner? CE II.ii.10
My house was at the Phoenix? Wast thou mad, My house was at the Phoenix. Wast thou mad CE II.ii.11
That thus so madlie thou did didst answere me? That thus so madly thou didst answer me? CE II.ii.12
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
What answer sir? when spake I such a word? What answer, sir? When spake I such a word? CE II.ii.13
E.Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Euen now, euen here, not halfe an howre since. Even now, even here, not half an hour since. CE II.ii.14
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I did not see you since you sent me hence I did not see you since you sent me hence CE II.ii.15
Home to the Centaur with the gold you gaue me. Home to the Centaur with the gold you gave me. CE II.ii.16
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Villaine, thou didst denie the golds receit,  Villain, thou didst deny the gold's receipt, CE II.ii.17
And toldst me of a Mistresse, and a dinner, And toldest me of a mistress and a dinner, CE II.ii.18
For which I hope thou feltst I was displeas'd. For which I hope thou feltest I was displeased. CE II.ii.19
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I am glad to see you in this merrie vaine, I am glad to see you in this merry vein.vein (n.)
old form: vaine
state of mind, motive, mood
CE II.ii.20
What meanes this iest, I pray you Master tell me? What means this jest, I pray you, master, tell me? CE II.ii.21
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Yea, dost thou ieere & flowt me in the teeth? Yea, dost thou jeer and flout me in the teeth?flout (v.)insult, abuse, mockCE II.ii.22
teeth, in theto my face, in direct opposition
Thinkst yu I iest? hold, take thou that, & that.Thinkest thou I jest? Hold, take thou that, and that. CE II.ii.23
Beats Dro.He beats Dromioearnest (adj.)genuine, real, seriousCE II.ii.24
S.Dr.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Hold sir, for Gods sake, now your iest is earnest, Hold, sir, for God's sake; now your jest is earnest. CE II.ii.24
Vpon what bargaine do you giue it me? Upon what bargain do you give it me? CE II.ii.25
Antiph.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Because that I familiarlie sometimes Because that I familiarly sometimes CE II.ii.26
Doe vse you for my foole, and chat with you, Do use you for my fool, and chat with you, CE II.ii.27
Your sawcinesse will iest vpon my loue, Your sauciness will jest upon my love,jest upon (v.)
old form: iest vpon
mock, scoff at, trifle with
CE II.ii.28
And make a Common of my serious howres, And make a common of my serious hours.common (n.)public property, common land, open pastureCE II.ii.29
When the sunne shines, let foolish gnats make sport, When the sun shines let foolish gnats make sport,sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainmentCE II.ii.30
But creepe in crannies, when he hides his beames: But creep in crannies when he hides his beams. CE II.ii.31
If you will iest with me, know my aspect, If you will jest with me, know my aspect,aspect (n.)[astrology] influential phase, direction of alignmentCE II.ii.32
And fashion your demeanor to my lookes, And fashion your demeanour to my looks, CE II.ii.33
Or I will beat this method in your sconce. Or I will beat this method in your sconce.sconce (n.)[jocular] head, pate, bonceCE II.ii.34
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Sconce call you it? so you ‘ Sconce ’ call you it? So you CE II.ii.35
would leaue batte-ring, I had rather haue it a head, and you would leave battering I had rather have it a head. An youand, an (conj.)if, whetherCE II.ii.36
vse these blows long, I must get a sconce for my head, use these blows long I must get a sconce for my head,sconce (n.)shelter, screen, guardCE II.ii.37
and Insconce it to, or else I shall seek my wit in my and ensconce it too, or else I shall seek my wit in mywit (n.)mind, brain, thoughtsCE II.ii.38
ensconce, insconce (v.)
old form: Insconce
protect, conceal, shelter
shoulders, but I pray sir, why am I beaten? shoulders. But I pray, sir, why am I beaten? CE II.ii.39
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Dost thou not know? Dost thou not know? CE II.ii.40
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Nothing sir, but that I am Nothing, sir, but that I am CE II.ii.41
beaten. beaten. CE II.ii.42
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Shall I tell you why? Shall I tell you why? CE II.ii.43
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I sir, and wherefore; for they Ay, sir, and wherefore; for they CE II.ii.44
say, euery why hath a wherefore. say every why hath a wherefore. CE II.ii.45
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Why first for flowting me, and then wherefore, Why, first: for flouting me; and then wherefore:flout (v.)
old form: flowting
insult, abuse, mock
CE II.ii.46
for vrging it the second time to me. For urging it the second time to me.urge (v.)
old form: vrging
provoke, incite, impel
CE II.ii.47
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Was there euer anie man thus beaten out of season, Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season,season, out of (adj./adv.)inopportunely, inappropriately, inconvenientlyCE II.ii.48
when in the why and the wherefore, is neither rime nor reason. When in the why and the wherefore is neither rhyme nor reason? CE II.ii.49
Well sir, I thanke you. Well, sir, I thank you. CE II.ii.50
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Thanke me sir, for what? Thank me, sir, for what? CE II.ii.51
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Marry sir, for this something Marry, sir, for this somethingmarry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryCE II.ii.52
that you gaue me for nothing. that you gave me for nothing. CE II.ii.53
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Ile make you amends next, I'll make you amends next, CE II.ii.54
to giue you nothing for something. But say sir, is it to give you nothing for something. But say, sir, is it CE II.ii.55
dinner time? dinner-time? CE II.ii.56
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
No sir, I thinke the meat wants No, sir. I think the meat wantswant (v.)lack, need, be withoutCE II.ii.57
that I haue. that I have. CE II.ii.58
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
In good time sir: what's In good time, sir. What's CE II.ii.59
that? that? CE II.ii.60
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Basting. Basting. CE II.ii.61
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Well sir, then 'twill be Well, sir, then 'twill be CE II.ii.62
drie. dry CE II.ii.63
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
If it be sir, I pray you eat none If it be, sir, I pray you eat none CE II.ii.64
of it. of it. CE II.ii.65
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Your reason? Your reason? CE II.ii.66
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Lest it make you chollericke, and Lest it make you choleric, andcholeric (adj.)
old form: chollericke
irritable, angry, enraged
CE II.ii.67
purchase me another drie basting. purchase me another dry basting.dry (adj.)
old form: drie
severe, hard, harsh
CE II.ii.68
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Well sir, learne to iest in Well, sir, learn to jest in CE II.ii.69
good time, there's a time for all things. good time. There's a time for all things.good (adj.)seasonable, appropriate, properCE II.ii.70
time, in goodat the right moment
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I durst haue denied that before I durst have denied that before CE II.ii.71
you were so chollericke. you were so choleric.choleric (adj.)
old form: chollericke
irritable, angry, enraged
CE II.ii.72
Anti.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
By what rule sir? By what rule, sir? CE II.ii.73
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Marry sir, by a rule as plaine as Marry, sir, by a rule as plain as CE II.ii.74
the plaine bald pate of Father time himselfe. the plain bald pate of Father Time himself. CE II.ii.75
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Let's heare it. Let's hear it. CE II.ii.76
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
There's no time for a man to There's no time for a man to CE II.ii.77
recouer his haire that growes bald by nature. recover his hair that grows bald by nature.recover (v.)get back; also: cover againCE II.ii.78
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
May he not doe it by fine May he not do it by finefine (n.)[legal] agreement to transfer land possessionCE II.ii.79
and recouerie? and recovery?recovery (n.)
old form: recouer
[legal] procedure for transferring property into full ownership
CE II.ii.80
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Yes, to pay a fine for a perewig, Yes, to pay a fine for a periwig,periwig (n.)
old form: perewig
wig
CE II.ii.81
fine (n.)[legal] fee, contracted amount
and recouer the lost haire of another man. and recover the lost hair of another man. CE II.ii.82
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Why, is Time such a Why is Time such a CE II.ii.83
niggard of haire, being (as it is) so plentifull an excrement? niggard of hair, being, as it is, so plentiful an excrement?excrement (n.)outgrowth [of hair]CE II.ii.84
niggard (n.)miser, mean person, skinflint
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Because it is a blessing that hee Because it is a blessing that he CE II.ii.85
bestowes on beasts, and what he hath scanted them in bestows on beasts, and what he hath scanted men inscant (v.)give out sparingly, curtail, withhold [from]CE II.ii.86
haire, hee hath giuen them in wit. hair he hath given them in wit.wit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityCE II.ii.87
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Why, but theres manie a Why, but there's many a CE II.ii.88
man hath more haire then wit. man hath more hair than wit. CE II.ii.89
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Not a man of those but he hath Not a man of those but he hath CE II.ii.90
the wit to lose his haire. the wit to lose his hair. CE II.ii.91
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Why thou didst conclude Why, thou didst conclude CE II.ii.92
hairy men plain dealers without wit. hairy men plain dealers, without wit.plain (adj.)honest, open, free from deceitCE II.ii.93
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
The plainer dealer, the sooner The plainer dealer, the sooner CE II.ii.94
lost; yet he looseth it in a kinde of iollitie. lost. Yet he loseth it in a kind of jollity.jollity (n.)
old form: iollitie
sexual pleasure, carnal enjoyment
CE II.ii.95
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
For what reason. For what reason? CE II.ii.96
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
For two, and sound ones to. For two, and sound ones, too. CE II.ii.97
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Nay not sound I pray Nay, not sound, I pray CE II.ii.98
you. you. CE II.ii.99
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Sure ones then. Sure ones, then. CE II.ii.100
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Nay, not sure in a thing Nay, not sure in a thing CE II.ii.101
falsing. falsing.falsing (adj.)deceptive, playing falseCE II.ii.102
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Certaine ones then. Certain ones, then. CE II.ii.103
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Name them. Name them. CE II.ii.104
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
The one to saue the money The one, to save the money CE II.ii.105
that he spends in trying: the other, that at dinner they that he spends in tiring. The other, that at dinner theytiring (n.)
old form: trying
hair-dressing
CE II.ii.106
should not drop in his porrage. should not drop in his porridge.porridge (n.)
old form: porrage
meat and vegetable stew or broth [reputed to produce strength]
CE II.ii.107
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
You would all this time You would all this time CE II.ii.108
haue prou'd, there is no time for all things. have proved there is no time for all things. CE II.ii.109
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Marry and did sir: namely, in Marry, and did, sir; namely, e'en CE II.ii.110
no time to recouer haire lost by Nature. no time to recover hair lost by nature. CE II.ii.111
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
But your reason was not But your reason was not CE II.ii.112
substantiall, why there is no time to recouer. substantial, why there is no time to recover. CE II.ii.113
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Thus I mend it: Time himselfe is bald, and therefore Thus I mend it: Time himselfmend (v.)amend, improve, make better, put rightCE II.ii.114
to the worlds end, will haue bald followers. followers. CE II.ii.116
An.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
I knew 'twould be a bald I knew 'twould be a baldbald (adj.)trivial, foolish, witlessCE II.ii.117
conclusion: but soft, who wafts vs yonder. conclusion. But, soft – who wafts us yonder?soft (adv.)[used as a command] not so fast, wait a moment, be quietCE II.ii.118
waft (v.)beckon, wave [at], signal
Enter Adriana and Luciana.Enter Adriana and Luciana CE II.ii.1.119
Adri.ADRIANA 
I, I, Antipholus, looke strange and frowne, Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown. CE II.ii.119
Some other Mistresse hath thy sweet aspects: Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects.aspect (n.)[of a human face] look, appearance, expressionCE II.ii.120
I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. CE II.ii.121
The time was once, when thou vn-vrg'd wouldst vow, The time was once when thou unurged wouldst vow CE II.ii.122
That neuer words were musicke to thine eare, That never words were music to thine ear, CE II.ii.123
That neuer obiect pleasing in thine eye, That never object pleasing in thine eye, CE II.ii.124
That neuer touch well welcome to thy hand, That never touch well welcome to thy hand, CE II.ii.125
That neuer meat sweet-sauour'd in thy taste, That never meat sweet-savoured in thy taste, CE II.ii.126
Vnlesse I spake, or look'd, or touch'd, or caru'd to thee. Unless I spake, or looked, or touched, or carved to thee. CE II.ii.127
How comes it now, my Husband, oh how comes it, How comes it now, my husband, O how comes it, CE II.ii.128
That thou art then estranged from thy selfe? That thou art then estranged from thyself? CE II.ii.129
Thy selfe I call it, being strange to me: Thyself I call it, being strange to me CE II.ii.130
That vndiuidable Incorporate That, undividable, incorporate,incorporate (adj.)united in one body, combined in one entityCE II.ii.131
Am better then thy deere selfes better part. Am better than thy dear self's better part. CE II.ii.132
Ah doe not teare away thy selfe from me; Ah, do not tear away thyself from me; CE II.ii.133
For know my loue: as easie maist thou fall For know, my love, as easy mayst thou fallfall (v.)drop, descend, let fallCE II.ii.134
A drop of water in the breaking gulfe, A drop of water in the breaking gulf,gulf (n.)
old form: gulfe
whirlpool
CE II.ii.135
And take vnmingled thence that drop againe And take unmingled thence that drop again CE II.ii.136
Without addition or diminishing, Without addition or diminishing, CE II.ii.137
As take from me thy selfe, and not me too. As take from me thyself, and not me too. CE II.ii.138
How deerely would it touch thee to the quicke, How dearly would it touch me to the quickdearly (adv.)
old form: deerely
keenly, deeply, intensely
CE II.ii.139
quick (n.)
old form: quicke
sensitive parts [of the body], tender flesh
Shouldst thou but heare I were licencious? Shouldst thou but hear I were licentious, CE II.ii.140
And that this body consecrate to thee, And that this body consecrate to thee CE II.ii.141
By Ruffian Lust should be contaminate? By ruffian lust should be contaminate? CE II.ii.142
Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurne at me, Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurn at me,spurn against / at (v.)
old form: spurne
kick out at, treat with contempt
CE II.ii.143
And hurle the name of husband in my face, And hurl the name of husband in my face, CE II.ii.144
And teare the stain'd skin of my Harlot brow, And tear the stained skin off my harlot brow,brow (n.)forehead [often plural, referring to the two prominences of the forehead]CE II.ii.145
And from my false hand cut the wedding ring, And from my false hand cut the wedding ring,false (adj.)disloyal, faithless, inconstant, unfaithfulCE II.ii.146
And breake it with a deepe-diuorcing vow? And break it with a deep-divorcing vow? CE II.ii.147
I know thou canst, and therefore see thou doe it. I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it! CE II.ii.148
I am possest with an adulterate blot, I am possessed with an adulterate blot.adulterate (adj.)adulterousCE II.ii.149
blot (n.)stain, disgrace, blemish
My bloud is mingled with the crime of lust: My blood is mingled with the crime of lust;crime (n.)sin, offence, wrong-doingCE II.ii.150
For if we two be one, and thou play false, For if we two be one, and thou play false,false (adv.)slanderously, faithlessly, with such calumnyCE II.ii.151
I doe digest the poison of thy flesh, I do digest the poison of thy flesh, CE II.ii.152
Being strumpeted by thy contagion: Being strumpeted by thy contagion.contagion (n.)contagious quality, infecting influenceCE II.ii.153
strumpet (v.)make a whore, pervert, debauch
Keepe then faire league and truce with thy true bed, Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed, CE II.ii.154
I liue distain'd, thou vndishonoured. I live unstained, thou undishonoured. CE II.ii.155
Antip.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Plead you to me faire dame? I know you not: Plead you to me, fair dame? I know you not. CE II.ii.156
In Ephesus I am but two houres old, In Ephesus I am but two hours old, CE II.ii.157
As strange vnto your towne, as to your talke, As strange unto your town as to your talk, CE II.ii.158
Who euery word by all my wit being scan'd, Who, every word by all my wit being scanned,wit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityCE II.ii.159
scan (v.)
old form: scan'd
examine, carefully consider
Wants wit in all, one word to vnderstand. Wants wit in all one word to understand.want (v.)lack, need, be withoutCE II.ii.160
Luci.LUCIANA 
Fie brother, how the world is chang'd with you: Fie, brother, how the world is changed with you. CE II.ii.161
When were you wont to vse my sister thus? When were you wont to use my sister thus?wont (v.)be accustomed, used [to], be in the habit ofCE II.ii.162
She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner. She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner. CE II.ii.163
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
By Dromio? By Dromio? CE II.ii.164
Drom.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
By me. By me? CE II.ii.165
Adr.ADRIANA 
By thee, and this thou didst returne from him. By thee; and this thou didst return from him:return (v.)
old form: returne
answer, report, say in reply [to]
CE II.ii.166
That he did buffet thee, and in his blowes, That he did buffet thee, and in his blowsbuffet (v.)beat, strike, cuffCE II.ii.167
Denied my house for his, me for his wife. Denied my house for his, me for his wife. CE II.ii.168
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Did you conuerse sir with this gentlewoman: Did you converse, sir, with this gentlewoman?gentlewoman (n.)woman of good breeding, well-born ladyCE II.ii.169
What is the course and drift of your compact? What is the course and drift of your compact?drift (n.)direction, progress, courseCE II.ii.170
compact (n.)agreement, contract, covenant
course (n.)gist, scope, tenor
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I sir? I neuer saw her till this time. I, sir? I never saw her till this time. CE II.ii.171
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Villaine thou liest, for euen her verie words, Villain, thou liest; for even her very words CE II.ii.172
Didst thou deliuer to me on the Mart. Didst thou deliver to me on the mart.deliver (v.)
old form: deliuer
report [to], communicate [to], tell, describe
CE II.ii.173
mart (n.)market
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I neuer spake with her in all my life. I never spake with her in all my life. CE II.ii.174
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
How can she thus then call vs by our names? How can she thus then call us by our names? –  CE II.ii.175
Vnlesse it be by inspiration. Unless it be by inspiration.inspiration (n.)supernatural power, inspired meansCE II.ii.176
Adri.ADRIANA 
How ill agrees it with your grauitie, How ill agrees it with your gravityill (adv.)badly, adversely, unfavourablyCE II.ii.177
gravity (n.)
old form: grauitie
respectability, authority, dignified position
To counterfeit thus grosely with your slaue, To counterfeit thus grossly with your slave,counterfeit (v.)pretend, feign, make believeCE II.ii.178
slave (n.)
old form: slaue
fellow, rascal, rogue, villain
grossly (adv.)
old form: grosely
openly, blatantly, brazenly
Abetting him to thwart me in my moode; Abetting him to thwart me in my mood.mood (n.)
old form: moode
anger, fury, frenzy, fit of temper
CE II.ii.179
Be it my wrong, you are from me exempt, Be it my wrong you are from me exempt;exempt (adj.)removed, cut off, excluded, debarredCE II.ii.180
But wrong not that wrong with a more contempt. But wrong not that wrong with a more contempt.more (adj.)greaterCE II.ii.181
Come I will fasten on this sleeue of thine: Come, I will fasten on this sleeve of thine. CE II.ii.182
Thou art an Elme my husband, I a Vine: Thou art an elm, my husband; I a vine, CE II.ii.183
Whose weaknesse married to thy stranger state, Whose weakness, married to thy stronger state, CE II.ii.184
Makes me with thy strength to communicate: Makes me with thy strength to communicate.communicate (v.)share [in], partake [of], participate [in]CE II.ii.185
If ought possesse thee from me, it is drosse, If aught possess thee from me, it is dross,aught (n.)
old form: ought
anything, [with negative word] nothing
CE II.ii.186
possess (v.)
old form: possesse
take possession of, seize
Vsurping Iuie, Brier, or idle Mosse, Usurping ivy, brier, or idle moss,idle (adj.)useless, barren, worthlessCE II.ii.187
Who all for want of pruning, with intrusion, Who, all for want of pruning, with intrusionwant (n.)lack, shortage, dearthCE II.ii.188
Infect thy sap, and liue on thy confusion. Infect thy sap, and live on thy confusion.confusion (n.)destruction, overthrow, ruinCE II.ii.189
intrusion (n.)breaking in, forced entry
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE  
(aside)move (v.)
old form: moues
appeal to, urge, exhort
CE II.ii.190
theme (n.)
old form: theame
subject, subject-matter, topic of discourse
To mee shee speakes, shee moues mee for her theame; To me she speaks; she moves me for her theme. CE II.ii.190
What, was I married to her in my dreame? What, was I married to her in my dream? CE II.ii.191
Or sleepe I now, and thinke I heare all this? Or sleep I now, and think I hear all this? CE II.ii.192
What error driues our eies and eares amisse? What error drives our eyes and ears amiss? CE II.ii.193
Vntill I know this sure vncertaintie, Until I know this sure uncertainty,sure (adj.)certain, definite, reliableCE II.ii.194
know (v.)unravel, get to understand
uncertainty (n.)
old form: vncertaintie
mystery, puzzle, enigma
Ile entertaine the free'd fallacie. I'll entertain the offered fallacy.fallacy (n.)
old form: fallacie
delusion, misconception, error
CE II.ii.195
entertain (v.)
old form: entertaine
accept as true, allow, accommodate
Luc.LUCIANA 
Dromio, goe bid the seruants spred for dinner. Dromio, go bid the servants spread for dinner.spread (v.)
old form: spred
lay the table
CE II.ii.196
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE  
(aside)bead (n.)[plural] rosary beadsCE II.ii.197
Oh for my beads, I crosse me for a sinner. O for my beads! I cross me for a sinner. CE II.ii.197
This is the Fairie land, oh spight of spights, This is the fairy land. O spite of spites,spite of spite
old form: spight
whatever happens, come what may
CE II.ii.198
We talke with Goblins, Owles and Sprights; We talk with goblins, owls, and sprites.sprite, spright (n.)
old form: Sprights
spirit, ghost, supernatural being
CE II.ii.199
If we obay them not, this will insue: If we obey them not, this will ensue: CE II.ii.200
They'll sucke our breath, or pinch vs blacke and blew. They'll suck our breath, or pinch us black and blue. CE II.ii.201
Luc.LUCIANA 
Why prat'st thou to thy selfe, and answer'st not? Why pratest thou to thyself, and answerest not?prate (v.)
old form: prat'st
prattle, chatter, blather
CE II.ii.202
Dromio, thou Dromio, thou snaile, thou slug, thou sot. Dromio, thou Dromio, thou snail, thou slug, thou sot.sot (n.)blockhead, idiot, doltCE II.ii.203
slug (n.)sluggard, lazy fellow
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
I am transformed Master, am I not? I am transformed, master, am not I?transform (v.)change in form, metamorphoseCE II.ii.204
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
I thinke thou art in minde, and so am I. I think thou art in mind, and so am I. CE II.ii.205
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Nay Master, both in minde, and in my shape. Nay, master, both in mind and in my shape. CE II.ii.206
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE 
Thou hast thine owne forme. Thou hast thine own form. CE II.ii.207
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
No, I am an Ape. No, I am an ape. CE II.ii.208
Luc.LUCIANA 
If thou art chang'd to ought, 'tis to an Asse. If thou art changed to aught, 'tis to an ass.aught (n.)
old form: ought
anything, [with negative word] nothing
CE II.ii.209
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
'Tis true she rides me, and I long for grasse. 'Tis true, she rides me, and I long for grass.ride (v.), past forms rid, riddencontrol, dominate, tyrannizeCE II.ii.210
'Tis so, I am an Asse, else it could neuer be, 'Tis so, I am an ass; else it could never be CE II.ii.211
But I should know her as well as she knowes me. But I should know her as well as she knows me. CE II.ii.212
Adr.ADRIANA 
Come, come, no longer will I be a foole, Come, come, no longer will I be a fool, CE II.ii.213
To put the finger in the eie and weepe; To put the finger in the eye and weep CE II.ii.214
Whil'st man and Master laughes my woes to scorne: Whilst man and master laughs my woes to scorn. CE II.ii.215
Come sir to dinner, Dromio keepe the gate: Come, sir, to dinner. – Dromio, keep the gate. –  CE II.ii.216
Husband Ile dine aboue with you to day, Husband, I'll dine above with you today,above (adv.)
old form: aboue
upstairs; [in stage directions] in the gallery or upper stage
CE II.ii.217
And shriue you of a thousand idle prankes: And shrive you of a thousand idle pranks. – idle (adj.)mad, crazy, lunaticCE II.ii.218
prank (n.)
old form: prankes
trick, frolic, mischief
shrive (v.)
old form: shriue
hear confession, grant absolution, forgive
Sirra, if any aske you for your Master, Sirrah, if any ask you for your master, CE II.ii.219
Say he dines forth, and let no creature enter: Say he dines forth, and let no creature enter. – forth (adv.)away from home, outCE II.ii.220
Come sister, Dromio play the Porter well. Come, sister. – Dromio, play the porter well. CE II.ii.221
Ant.ANTIPHOLUS OF SYRACUSE  
(aside) CE II.ii.222
Am I in earth, in heauen, or in hell? Am I in earth, in heaven, or in hell? CE II.ii.222
Sleeping or waking, mad or well aduisde: Sleeping or waking? mad or well advised?well (adv.)in one's right mind, sane, rationalCE II.ii.223
Knowne vnto these, and to my selfe disguisde: Known unto these, and to myself disguised! CE II.ii.224
Ile say as they say, and perseuer so: I'll say as they say and persever so,persever (v.)
old form: perseuer
persevere, persist, keep at it
CE II.ii.225
And in this mist at all aduentures go. And in this mist at all adventures go.adventure (n.)
old form: aduentures
venture, enterprise, issue, hazard
CE II.ii.226
mist (n.)confused state, state of uncertainty
S.Dro.DROMIO OF SYRACUSE 
Master, shall I be Porter at the gate? Master, shall I be porter at the gate? CE II.ii.227
Adr.ADRIANA 
I, and let none enter, least I breake your pate. Ay, and let none enter, lest I break your pate.break (v.)
old form: breake
crack, split, beat
CE II.ii.228
Luc.LUCIANA 
Come, come, Antipholus, we dine to late.Come, come, Antipholus, we dine too late. CE II.ii.229
Exeunt CE II.ii.229
 Previous Act II, Scene II Next  
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL