ill (adj.)
evil, wicked, immoral
2H4 I.ii.166[Lord Chief Justice to Falstaff] You follow the young Prince up and down, like his ill angel
2H4 V.ii.83[Lord Chief Justice to King Henry V] If the deed were ill
CE III.ii.20[Luciana to Antipholus of Syracuse] Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word
CE V.i.110[Adriana to Abbess] And ill it doth beseem your holiness / To separate the husband and the wife
Cym V.v.159[Iachimo to Cymbeline, of Posthumus] He was too good to be / Where ill men were
H8 I.iii.60[Sands to Lord Chamberlain, of Wolsey] in him / Sparing would show a worse sin than ill doctrine
H8 IV.ii.43[Katherine to Griffith, of Wolsey] Of his own body he was ill [i.e. unchaste]
JC IV.iii.286[Brutus to Caesar's ghost] Ill spirit
KJ IV.ii.219[King John to Hubert] How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds / Make deeds ill done! [first instance]
Luc.1530[of Sinon] So fair a form lodged not a mind so ill
Luc.579[Lucrece to Tarquin] End thy ill aim before thy shoot be ended [or: sense 1]
Mac III.ii.55[Macbeth to Lady Macbeth] Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill [or: noun use]
MM II.i.64[Elbow to Escalus, of Mistress Overdone] now she professes a hot-house, which I think is a very ill house too
MW III.iii.103[Mistress Page to Mistress Ford, of a man being in Ford's house] to take an ill advantage of his absence
Per IV.vi.107[Lysimachus to Marina] I came with no ill intent
R2 II.i.93[John of Gaunt to King Richard] I see thee ill; ... in thee seeing ill [punning on previous line]
R3 I.iv.214[Clarence to Murderers, of a killing] For whose sake did I that ill deed?
R3 III.vi.14[Scrivener alone] Bad is the world, and all will come to naught / When such ill dealing must be seen in thought
R3 IV.iv.217[Queen Elizabeth to King Richard, of the dead princes] to their lives ill friends were contrary
Sonn.34.14[] those tears are pearl which thy love sheds, / And they are rich, and ransom all ill deeds
Tem I.ii.458[Miranda to Prospero, of Ferdinand] There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple
Tem I.ii.459[Miranda to Prospero, of Ferdinand] If the ill spirit have so fair a house
TG V.iv.61.1[Valentine to Proteus] Thou friend of an ill fashion!
TNK II.i.144[Arcite to Palamon, reflecting on what would happen if they were at liberty] envy of ill men / Crave our acquaintance
TNK II.i.163[Palamon to Arcite] Had not the loving gods found this place for us, / We had died as they do, ill old men
WT V.iii.149[Leontes to Hermione and Polixenes] Both your pardons / That e'er I put between your holy looks / My ill suspicion
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