countenance (n.) Old form(s): countinance
expression, look, face
1H4 II.iv.385[Hostess to all, of Falstaff] how he holds his countenance! [i.e. keeps his face straight]
2H6 III.i.99[Gloucester to Suffolk] thou shalt not see me ... change my countenance for this arrest
Cor IV.vi.60.1[Messenger to all, of the nobles] news is coming / That turns their countenances
H8 II.iv.26[Queen Katherine to King Henry] I have been, ... subject to your countenance, glad or sorry / As I saw it inclined
H8 III.ii.81[Cromwell to Wolsey, of King Henry] a heed / Was in his countenance
Sonn.86.13[of his friend] when your countenance filled up his line, / Then lacked I matter, that enfeebled mine
TC IV.v.195[Nestor to Hector] this thy countenance ... / I never saw till now
Tit I.i.266[Saturninus to Tamora] Clear up ... that cloudy countenance
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL