burden, burthen (n.) Old form(s): burthen
birth, state of pregnancy
CE V.i.344[Abbess to Egeon] a wife once called Aemilia, / That bore thee at a burden two fair sons
KJ III.i.90[Constance to King Philip, of the marriage day being recognized in the calendar] if it must stand still, let wives with child / Pray that their burdens may not fall this day
Sonn.59.4[of brains] labouring for invention bear amiss / The second burthen of a former child
Sonn.97.7[] The teeming autumn big with rich increase, / Bearing the wanton burthen of the prime
WT IV.iv.262[Autolycus to Mopsa, of a ballad] how a usurer's wife was brought to bed of twenty money-bags at a burden
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL