grace (n.) 1
honour, favour, recognition, respect
1H4 III.i.176 [Worcester to Hotspur, of Hotspur's behaviour] Though sometimes it show greatness, courage, blood - / And that's the dearest grace it renders you
1H4 V.iv.156 [Prince Hal aside to Falstaff] if a lie may do thee grace, / I'll gild it with the happiest terms I have
1H6 I.iv.7 [Master Gunner to Boy] Something I must do to procure me grace
1H6 V.iii.33 [Richard to Pucelle] A goodly prize, fit for the devil's grace!
2H4 I.ii.27 [Falstaff to Page, of Prince Henry] He may keep his own grace, but he's almost out of mine [also: title of 'your grace']
2H4 V.ii.30 [Prince John to Lord Chief Justice] Though no man be assured what grace to find, / You stand in coldest expectation
2H4 V.v.6 [Falstaff to Shallow] I will make the King do you grace
AC II.ii.152 [Antony to Caesar, of the marriage proposal] Further this act of grace
AW V.ii.46 [Parolles to Lafew] bring me in some grace, for you did bring me out
CE II.i.87 [Adriana to Luciana, of her husband] His company must do his minions grace [i.e. reflect well on his minions]
Cym V.v.7 [Cymbeline to all, of the soldier] He shall be happy that can find him, if / Our grace can make him so
H5 II.Chorus.28 [Chorus, of the traitors] by their hands this grace of kings must die [i.e. the king who most graces the name]
H8 II.iv.22 [Queen Katherine to King Henry] thus you should proceed to put me off / And take your good grace from me
Ham I.ii.124 [Claudius to Gertrude, of Hamlet's agreement] in grace whereof / No jocund health that Denmark drinks today / But that the great cannon to the clouds shall tell
Ham II.ii.53 [Claudius to Polonius, of the ambassadors] do grace to them
JC III.ii.58 [Brutus to all] Do grace to Caesar's corpse
KL I.iv.163 [Fool to Lear] Fools had ne'er less grace in a year
KL V.iii.68 [Gonerill to Regan, of Edmund] In his own grace he doth exalt himself / More than in your addition [i.e. more than the honour you have given him]
MM IV.iii.134 [disguised Duke to Isabella] you shall have ... / Grace of the Duke
MND IV.i.133 [Theseus to Egeus, of the Athenians] they ... / Came here in grace of our solemnity
R2 III.iii.181 [King Richard to Northumberland] In the base-court ... where kings grow base / To come at traitors' calls, and do them grace
RJ II.iii.82 [Romeo to Friar, of Juliet] Her I love now / Doth grace for grace and love for love allow
Tem V.i.70 [Prospero to charmed Gonzalo] I will pay thy graces / Home
TG III.i.146 [Duke reading Valentine's letter to Silvia, of his thoughts being with her] I ... curse the grace that with such grace hath blessed them [second instance: see also grace = 'fortune']
Tim I.i.74 [Poet to Painter, of Fortune and Timon] Whose present grace to present slaves and servants / Translates his rivals
WT II.i.122 [Hermione to her Ladies] This action I now go on / Is for my better grace
WT III.ii.46 [Hermione to Leontes] I appeal / To your own conscience, sir, before Polixenes / Came to your court, how I was in your grace

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