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Search phrase: smell

Plays

 46 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.ii.5smell somewhat strong of her strong displeasure.smell somewhat strong of her strong displeasure.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.ii.7smell so strongly as thou speakest of. I will henceforthsmell so strongly as thou speak'st of: I will hencefoorth
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.318Mine eyes smell onions, I shall weep anon.Mine eyes smell Onions, I shall weepe anon:
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.101Thou losest thy old smell.Thou loosest thy old smell.
CymbelineCym V.iv.115Was sulphurous to smell: the holy eagleWas sulphurous to smell: the holy Eagle
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.53To see him shine so brisk, and smell so sweet,To see him shine so briske, and smell so sweet,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.271I smell it! Upon my life it will do well!I smell it: Vpon my life, it will do wond'rous well.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.157To wake a wolf is as bad as smell a fox.To wake a Wolfe, is as bad as to smell a Fox.
Henry VH5 IV.iii.103The smell whereof shall breed a plague in France.The smell whereof shall breed a Plague in France.
Henry VH5 V.i.20Hence! I am qualmish at the smell of leek.Hence; I am qualmish at the smell of Leeke.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.253With whose sweet smell the air shall be perfumed,With whose sweet smell the Ayre shall be perfum'd,
Julius CaesarJC III.i.274That this foul deed shall smell above the earthThat this foule deede, shall smell aboue the earth
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.452Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds;Lillies that fester, smel far worse then weeds,
King JohnKJ IV.iii.113For I am stifled with this smell of sin.For I am stifled with this smell of sinne.
King LearKL I.i.15bed. Do you smell a fault?bed. Do you smell a fault?
King LearKL I.v.23what a man cannot smell out he may spy into.what a man cannot smell out, he may spy into.
King LearKL II.iv.68not a nose among twenty but can smell him that'snot a nose among twenty, but can smell him that's
King LearKL III.iv.178I smell the blood of a British man.’I smell the blood of a Brittish man.
King LearKL III.vii.92Go thrust him out at gates and let him smellGo thrust him out at gates, and let him smell
King LearKL IV.vi.180Thou knowest the first time that we smell the airThou know'st, the first time that we smell the Ayre
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.119O, marry me to one Frances! I smell someO, marrie me to one Francis, I smell some
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.i.74O, I smell false Latin! ‘ Dunghill ’ forOh I smell false Latine, dunghel for
MacbethMac V.i.48Here's the smell of the blood still. All the perfumesHeere's the smell of the blood still: all the per-fumes
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.159And smell of calumny. I have begun,And smell of calumnie. I haue begun,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.31Yes, to smell pork, to eat of the habitationYes, to smell porke, to eate of the habitation
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.266prunes – and, by my troth, I cannot abide the smell ofPrunes) and by my troth, I cannot abide the smell of
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.68men's apparel and smell like Bucklersbury in simple-time.mens apparrell, and smell like Bucklers-berry in simple time:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.84rankest compound of villainous smell that ever offendedrankest compound of villanous smell, that euer offended
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.80But stay – I smell a man of middle earth.But stay, I smell a man of middle earth.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.46Nay, 'a rubs himself with civet; can you smellNay a rubs himselfe with Ciuit, can you smell
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iv.57I am stuffed, cousin, I cannot smell.I am stuft cosin, I cannot smell.
OthelloOth III.iii.230Foh! One may smell in such a will most rank,Foh, one may smel in such, a will most ranke,
OthelloOth IV.iii.93Their wives have sense like them: they see and smell,Their wiues haue sense like them: They see, and smell,
OthelloOth V.ii.15It must needs wither. I'll smell it on the tree.It needs must wither. Ile smell thee on the Tree.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.44By any other word would smell as sweet.By any other word would smell as sweete,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.70I smell sweet savours and I feel soft things.I smel sweet sauours, and I feele soft things:
The TempestTem II.ii.26fishlike smell; a kind of not-of-the-newest poor-John.fish-like smell: a kinde of, not of the newest poore-Iohn:
The TempestTem IV.i.199Monster, I do smell all horse-piss, at whichMonster, I do smell all horse-pisse, at which
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.124Taste, touch, smell, all pleased from thy table rise;tast, touch all pleas'd from thy Table rise:
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.155Excellent! I smell a device.Excellent, I smell a deuice.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.22 acquainted with the smell before, knew it was Crab, andacquainted with the smell before, knew it was Crab; and
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.86Perfumes to kill the smell o'th' prison. After,Perfumes to kill the smell o'th prison, after
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.ii.17Smell where resistance is. I'll set it downSmell where resistance is. Ile set it downe
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.151You smell this business with a sense as coldYou smell this businesse with a sence as cold
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.638Are you in earnest, sir? (Aside) I smell theAre you in earnest, Sir? (I smell the
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.668for a cutpurse; a good nose is requisite also, to smell outfor a Cut-purse; a good Nose is requisite also, to smell out

Poems

 12 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.9 Lest she some subtle practice smellLeast she some subtill practise smell,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.695 Unapt for tender smell or speedy flight, Vnapt for tender smell, or speedie flight,
SonnetsSonn.69.12 To thy fair flower add the rank smell of weeds. To thy faire flower ad the rancke smell of weeds,
SonnetsSonn.94.14 Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Lillies that fester, smell far worse then weeds.
SonnetsSonn.98.5 Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Yet nor the laies of birds, nor the sweet smell
SonnetsSonn.141.7 Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invited Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be inuited
Venus and AdonisVen.165 Herbs for their smell, and sappy plants to bear; Herbes for their smell, and sappie plants to beare.
Venus and AdonisVen.441 And nothing but the very smell were left me, And nothing but the verie smell were left me,
Venus and AdonisVen.686 To make the cunning hounds mistake their smell, To make the cunning hounds mistake their smell,
Venus and AdonisVen.691 ‘ For there his smell with others being mingled, For there his smell with others being mingled,
Venus and AdonisVen.936 Gloss on the rose, smell to the violet? Glosse on the rose, smell to the violet.
Venus and AdonisVen.1171 She bows her head the new-sprung flower to smell, She bowes her head, the new-sprong floure to smel,

Glossary

 7 result(s).
nosesmell
overstinkstink worse than, drown the smell of
perfumersomeone employed to make rooms smell sweetly
savoursmell, stench, stink
savourscent, fragrance, smell
savoursmell, reek, stink
tender-smellingwith a sensitive sense of smell

Thesaurus

 11 result(s).
drown a smelloverstink
rooms smell sweetly, someone who makesperfumer
sensitive sense of smell, with a tender-smelling
smellsavour
smellnose
smellsavour
smellbalm
smellsavour
smell sweetly, someone who makes roomsperfumer
smell, drown aoverstink
smell, with a sensitive sense of tender-smelling

Themes and Topics

 1 result(s).
Plants...nosa sweet briar known for its sweet smell it ‘out-sweetened not’ innogen’s breath...

Words Families

 5 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
SMELLBASICsmell n, smell v
SMELLSTATEsweet-smellng adj, tender-smelling adj
SMELLNOTsmell-less adj
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