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Search phrase: scene

Plays

 37 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.78Belong to Egypt. Good now, play one sceneBelong to Egypt. Good now, play one Scene
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.139Presents more woeful pageants than the scenePresents more wofull Pageants then the Sceane
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.164And whistles in his sound; last Scene of all,And whistles in his sound. Last Scene of all,
CoriolanusCor II.ii.94When he might act the woman in the scene,When he might act the Woman in the Scene,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.185The gods look down, and this unnatural sceneThe Gods looke downe, and this vnnaturall Scene
CymbelineCym II.ii.51Goes into the trunk. The scene closesExit.
HamletHam II.ii.398scene individable, or poem unlimited.Scene indiuidible: or Poem vnlimited.
HamletHam II.ii.588Have by the very cunning of the sceneHaue by the very cunning of the Scoene,
HamletHam III.ii.86One scene of it comes near the circumstance,One Scoene of it comes neere the Circumstance
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.159On bloody courses, the rude scene may end,On bloody Courses, the rude Scene may end,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.197For all my reign hath been but as a sceneFor all my Reigne, hath beene but as a Scene
Henry VH5 I.chorus.4And monarchs to behold the swelling scene!And Monarchs to behold the swelling Scene.
Henry VH5 II.chorus.34The King is set from London; and the sceneThe King is set from London, and the Scene
Henry VH5 II.chorus.42Unto Southampton do we shift our scene.Vnto Southampton do we shift our Scene.
Henry VH5 III.chorus.1Thus with imagined wing our swift scene fliesThus with imagin'd wing our swift Scene flyes,
Henry VH5 IV.chorus.48And so our scene must to the battle fly;And so our Scene must to the Battaile flye:
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.vi.10What scene of death hath Roscius now to act?What Scene of death hath Rossius now to Acte?
Julius CaesarJC III.i.112Shall this our lofty scene be acted over,Shall this our lofty Scene be acted ouer,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.161O, what a scene of foolery have I seen,O what a Scene of fool'ry haue I seene.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.717Worthies, away! The scene begins to cloud.Worthies away, the Scene begins to cloud.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.17Hath a great scene. The image of the jestHath a great Scene; the image of the iest
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.15Forsook his scene and entered in a brake,Forsooke his Scene, and entred in a brake,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.56A tedious brief scene of young PyramusLis. A tedious breefe Scene of yong Piramus,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.213that's the scene that I would see, which will be merely athat's the Scene that I would see, which will be meerely a
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.6Whom our fast-growing scene must findWhom our fast growing scene must finde
PericlesPer IV.iv.7Where our scene seems to live. I do beseech youWhere our sceanes seemes to liue, / I doe beseech you
PericlesPer IV.iv.48By Lady Fortune, while our scene must playBy Lady Fortune, while our Steare must play,
Richard IIR2 III.ii.164Allowing him a breath, a little scene,Allowing him a breath, a little Scene,
Richard IIR2 V.iii.78Our scene is altered from a serious thing,Our Scene is alter'd from a serious thing,
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.38What means this scene of rude impatience?What meanes this Scene of rude impatience?
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.27Woe's scene, world's shame, grave's due by life usurped,Woes Scene, Worlds shame, Graues due, by life vsurpt,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.91A queen in jest, only to fill the scene.A Queene in ieast, onely to fill the Scene.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.iii.19My dismal scene I needs must act alone.My dismall Sceane, I needs must act alone:
Troilus and CressidaTC prologue.1In Troy there lies the scene. From isles of GreeceIN Troy there lyes the Scene: From Iles of Greece
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.173Must be the scene of mirth; to cough and spit,Must be the Scene of myrth, to cough, and spit,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.i.16I turn my glass, and give my scene such growingI turne my glasse, and giue my Scene such growing
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.590The scene you play were mine. For instance, sir,The Scene you play, were mine. For instance Sir,

Poems

 1 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
The Phoenix and TurtlePhoen.52 As chorus to their tragic scene. As Chorus to their Tragique Scene.

Glossary

 13 result(s).
AngleterreEngland. [Click on this word for a translation of the French in this scene.]
appearerone who arrives on the scene
chevalhorse [Click on this word for a link to a translation of the French in this scene.]
diabledevil [Click on this word for a link to a translation of the French in this scene.]
DieuGod [Click on this word for a link to a translation of the French in this scene.]
inductionopening scene [of a play], initial step, preparation
pageantshow, scene, spectacle, tableau
pardonnezpardon [Click on this word for a link to a translation of the French in this scene.]
pensethink [Click on this word for a link to the translation of the French in this scene.]
picturescene, visible position, conspicuous place
quiwho [Click on this word for a link to a translation of the French in this scene.]
scenestage, performing area
sceneplay, drama, performance

Thesaurus

 5 result(s).
arrives on the scene, one whoappearer
opening scene [of a play]induction
scenepageant
scenepicture
scene, opening [of a play]induction

Themes and Topics

 2 result(s).
Stage directions... for example the opening direction in a scene will be numbered by referring to line 1 ...
...e numbered by referring to line 1 of the scene a direction immediately before line 42 ...
Thou and you... then continues with thou throughout the scene why are you moved thus tnk ii i 2...
...f his feelings and motivation during the scene interestingly beatrice always uses you...

Words Families

 2 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
ROSEPART OF BODYSCENE
SCENEBASICscene n
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL