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Search phrase: man

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 1913 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.24How called you the man you speak of, madam?How call'd you the man you speake of Madam?
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.111ask you a question. Man is enemy to virginity; how mayaske you a question. Man is enemie to virginitie, how may
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.117There is none. Man setting down before youThere is none: Man setting downe before you,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.122Virginity being blown down, man will quicklierVirginity beeing blowne downe, Man will quicklier
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.ii.45In their poor praise he humbled. Such a manIn their poore praise he humbled: Such a man
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.85at an earthquake, 'twould mend the lottery well; a manat an earthquake, 'twould mend the Lotterie well, a man
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.89That man should be at woman's command, andThat man should be at womans command, and
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.63Then here's a man stands that has brought his pardon.Then heres a man stands that has brought his pardon,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.ii.8Truly, madam, if God have lent a man anyTruly Madam, if God haue lent a man any
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.17Right, as 'twere a man assured of a – Right, as 'twere a man assur'd of a------
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.103Into your guiding power. This is the man.Into your guiding power: This is the man.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.192To any Count, to all Counts, to what is man.To any Count, to all Counts: to what is man.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.193To what is Count's man; Count's master is ofTo what is Counts man: Counts maister is of
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.197I must tell thee, sirrah, I write man, to whichI must tell thee sirrah, I write Man: to which
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.227default, ‘He is a man I know'.default, he is a man I know.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.252Methinkst thou art a general offence and every man shouldmee-think'st thou art a generall offence, and euery man shold
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.296A young man married is a man that's marred.A yong man maried, is a man that's mard:
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.22Marry, you are the wiser man, for many a man'sMarry you are the wiser man: for many a mans
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.44man is his clothes. Trust him not in matter of heavyman is his cloathes: Trust him not in matter of heauie
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.i.11But like a common and an outward manBut like a common and an outward man,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.4melancholy man.melancholly man.
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.8and sing. I knew a man that had this trick of melancholyand sing: I know a man that had this tricke of melancholy
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.16man loves money, with no stomach.man loues money, with no stomacke.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.i.17be a man of his own fancy, not to know what we speakbe a man of his owne fancie, not to know what we speak
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.4it he changed almost into another man.it, he chang'd almost into another man.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.143I will never trust a man again for keepingI will neuer trust a man againe, for keeping
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.253that an honest man should not have; what anthat an honest man should not haue; what an
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.254honest man should have, he has nothing.honest man should haue, he has nothing.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.264man what honour I can, but of this I am not certain.man what honour I can, but of this I am not certaine.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.329There's place and means for every man alive.There's place and meanes for euery man aliue.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.25I would cozen the man of his wife and do hisI would cousen the man of his wife, and do his
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.103and nod at every man.and nod at euerie man.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.i.7This man may help me to his majesty's ear,This man may helpe me to his Maiesties eare,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.ii.26My lord, I am a man whom Fortune hathMy Lord I am a man whom fortune hath
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.203I saw the man today, if man he be.I saw the man to day, if man he bee.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.233.1Is this the man you speak of?Is this the man you speake of?
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.251I am a poor man, and at your majesty'sI am a poore man, and at your Maiesties
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.285By Jove, if ever I knew man 'twas you.By Ioue if euer I knew man 'twas you.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.i.36Feeds beast as man. The nobleness of lifeFeeds Beast as Man; the Noblenesse of life
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.8Is this the man? Is't you, sir, that knowIs this the Man? Is't you sir that know
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.72For, as it is a heartbreaking to see a handsome manFor, as it is a heart-breaking to see a handsome man
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.115The man from Sicyon – is there such an one?The man from Scicion, / Is there such an one?
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.163When it pleaseth their deities to take the wife of a manwhen it pleaseth their Deities to take the wife of a man
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.164from him, it shows to man the tailors of the earth;from him, it shewes to man the Tailors of the earth:
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iv.9A man who is the abstract of all faultsa man, who is th' abstracts of all faults,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iv.43And the ebbed man, ne'er loved till ne'er worth love,And the ebb'd man, / Ne're lou'd, till ne're worth loue,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.v.54Note him, good Charmian, 'tis the man; but note him!Note him good Charmian, 'tis the man; but note him.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.v.61So does it no man else. Met'st thou my posts?So do's it no mans else. Met'st thou my Posts?
Antony and CleopatraAC I.v.72.1My man of men.My man of men.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.41.1Not like a formal man.Not like a formall man.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.47.2Th'art an honest man.Th'art an honest man.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.76The man is innocent.The man is innocent.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.19Have one man but a man? And that is itHaue one man but a man, and that his it
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.40I came before you here a man preparedI came before you heere, / A man prepar'd
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.88I will praise any man that will praise me;I will praise any man that will praise me,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.1Here they'll be, man. Some o' theirHeere they'l be man: some o'th'their
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.64And, though thou think me poor, I am the manand though thou thinke me poore, I am the man
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.89'A bears the third part of the world, man; seest not?A beares the third part of the world man: seest not?
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.109The holding every man shall beat as loudThe holding euery man shall beate as loud,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.ii.53.1So is he, being a man.so is he being a man.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.37.2A proper man.A proper man.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.41The man hath seen some majesty, and should know.The man hath seene some Maiesty, and should know.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.v.3What, man?What man?
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vii.18Appear there for a man. Speak not against it;Appeare there for a man. Speake not against it,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vii.78.2Well I know the man.Well, I know the man.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xi.62To the young man send humble treaties, dodgeTo the young man send humble Treaties, dodge
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xii.15A private man in Athens. This for him.A priuate man in Athens: this for him.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.87The bidding of the fullest man, and worthiestThe bidding of the fullest man, and worthiest
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.33Now like a man of steel. You that will fight,Now like a man of Steele, you that will fight,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.viii.22Get goal for goal of youth. Behold this man.Get gole for gole of youth. Behold this man,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ix.6.1What man is this?What man is this?
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xi.3Is forth to man his galleys. To the vales,Is forth to Man his Gallies. To the Vales,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.92'Tis said, man, and farewell.'Tis said man, and farewell.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.115Wilt thou not answer, man?wilt thou not answer man?
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.50The business of this man looks out of him;The businesse of this man lookes out of him,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.78.1But such another man!But such another man.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.93Think you there was or might be such a manThinke you there was, or might be such a man
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.174Through th' ashes of my chance. Wert thou a man,Through th'Ashes of my chance: Wer't thou a man,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.241.2This is the man.This is the man.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.26no man in good earnest, nor no further in sport neither,no man in good earnest, nor no further in sport neyther,
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.110There comes an old man and his three sons – There comes an old man, and his three sons.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.120Yonder they lie, the poor old man their father makingyonder they lie, the poore old man their Father, making
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.141Is yonder the man?Is yonder the man??
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.148is such odds in the man. In pity of the challenger'sis such oddes in the man: In pitie of the challengers
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.156Young man, have you challenged Charles theYoung man, haue you challeng'd Charles the
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.197Now Hercules be thy speed, young man!Now Hercules, be thy speede yong man.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.200O excellent young man!Oh excellent yong man.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.209What is thy name, young man?What is thy name yong man?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.212I would thou hadst been son to some man else.I would thou hadst beene son to some man else,
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.225Had I before known this young man his son,Had I before knowne this yong man his sonne,
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.114That I did suit me all points like a man?That I did suite me all points like a man,
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.121What shall I call thee when thou art a man?What shall I call thee when thou art a man?
As You Like ItAYL II.ii.1Can it be possible that no man saw them?Can it be possible that no man saw them?
As You Like ItAYL II.iii.54I'll do the service of a younger manIle doe the seruice of a yonger man
As You Like ItAYL II.iii.56O good old man, how well in thee appearsOh good old man, how well in thee appeares
As You Like ItAYL II.iii.63But, poor old man, thou prunest a rotten treeBut poore old man, thou prun'st a rotten tree,
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.17A young man and an old in solemn talk.a yong man and an old in solemne talke.
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.25As sure I think did never man love so – As sure I thinke did neuer man loue so:
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.58I pray you, one of you question yond manI pray you, one of you question yon'd man,
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.75But I am shepherd to another man,But I am shepheard to another man,
As You Like ItAYL II.v.22Well then, if ever I thank any man, I'll thank you;Well then, if euer I thanke any man, Ile thanke you:
As You Like ItAYL II.v.24two dog-apes, and when a man thanks me heartily,two dog-Apes. And when a man thankes me hartily,
As You Like ItAYL II.v.48That any man turn ass,that any man turne Asse:
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.2For I can nowhere find him like a man.For I can no where finde him, like a man.
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.87Unclaimed of any man. But who come here?Vnclaim'd of any. man But who come here?
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.92Art thou thus boldened, man, by thy distressArt thou thus bolden'd man by thy distres?
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.130And give it food. There is an old poor manAnd giue it food. There is an old poore man,
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.143And one man in his time plays many parts,And one man in his time playes many parts,
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.201Go to my cave and tell me. – Good old man,Go to my Caue, and tell mee. Good old man,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.54sweat of a man? Shallow, shallow. A better instance, Isweat of a man? Shallow, shallow: A better instance I
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.62Most shallow man! Thou worms' meat, inMost shallow man: Thou wormes meate in
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.68shallow man! God make incision in thee, thou art raw!shallow man: God make incision in thee, thou art raw.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.70that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness,that I weare; owe no man hate, enuie no mans happinesse:
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.125Some, how brief the life of manSome, how briefe the Life of man
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.174Is it a man?Is it a man?
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.189though I am caparisoned like a man, I have a doubletthough I am caparison'd like a man, I haue a doublet
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.193that thou mightst pour this concealed man out of thythat thou might'st powre this conceal'd man out of thy
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.197So you may put a man in your belly.So you may put a man in your belly.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.199man? Is his head worth a hat? Or his chin worth aman? Is his head worth a hat? Or his chin worth a
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.202Why, God will send more, if the man will beWhy God will send more, if the man will bee
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.309With a priest that lacks Latin, and a rich manWith a Priest that lacks Latine, and a rich man
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.333his youth an inland man – one that knew courtship toohis youth an inland man, one that knew Courtship too
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.345those that are sick. There is a man haunts the forestthose that are sicke. There is a man haunts the Forrest,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.355He taught me how to know a man in love; in which cagehe taught me how to know a man in loue: in which cage
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.366desolation. But you are no such man: you are ratherdesolation: but you are no such man; you are rather
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.2your goats, Audrey. And now, Audrey, am I the manyour / Goates, Audrey : and how Audrey am I the man
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.12Understanding, it strikes a man more dead than a greatvnderstanding: it strikes a man more dead then a great
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.44Amen. A man may, if he were of a fearfulAmen. A man may if he were of a fearful
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.48It is said, ‘ Many a man knows no end of his goods.’It is said, many a man knowes no end of his goods;
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.49Right! Many a man has good horns, and knows no endright: Many a man has good Hornes, and knows no end
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.53Is the single man therefore blessed? No. As a walledIs the single man therefore blessed? No, as a wall'd
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.55of a married man more honourable than the bare browof a married man, more honourable then the bare brow
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.63I will not take her on gift of any man.I wil not take her on guift of any man.
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.73curb, and the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires;curb, and the Falcon her bels, so man hath his desires,
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.75And will you, being a man of your breeding, beAnd wil you (being a man of your breeding) be
As You Like ItAYL III.iv.3that tears do not become a man.that teares do not become a man.
As You Like ItAYL III.iv.35man as Orlando?man as Orlando?
As You Like ItAYL III.iv.36O, that's a brave man! He writes brave verses,O that's a braue man, hee writes braue verses,
As You Like ItAYL III.v.51You are a thousand times a properer manYou are a thousand times a properer man
As You Like ItAYL III.v.61Cry the man mercy, love him, take his offer.Cry the man mercy, loue him, take his offer,
As You Like ItAYL III.v.65I had rather hear you chide than this man woo.I had rather here you chide, then this man wooe.
As You Like ItAYL III.v.102To glean the broken ears after the manTo gleane the broken eares after the man
As You Like ItAYL III.v.115He'll make a proper man. The best thing in himHee'll make a proper man: the best thing in him
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.87was not any man died in his own person, videlicit, in awas not anie man died in his owne person (videlicet) in a
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.154A man that had a wife with such a wit, he mightA man that had a wife with such a wit, he might
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.18Were man as rare as phoenix. 'Od's my will,Were man as rare as Phenix: 'od's my will,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.48Whiles the eye of man did woo me,Whiles the eye of man did wooe me,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.97What man I am, and how, and why, and whereWhat man I am, and how, and why, and where
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.107A wretched ragged man, o'ergrown with hair,A wretched ragged man, ore-growne with haire
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.117When that the sleeping man should stir; for 'tisWhen that the sleeping man should stirre; for 'tis
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.120This seen, Orlando did approach the man,This seene, Orlando did approach the man,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.164Be of good cheer, youth! You a man? You lackBe of good cheere youth: you a man? / You lacke
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.173be a man.be a man.
As You Like ItAYL V.i.9the world. Here comes the man you mean.the world: here comes the man you meane.
As You Like ItAYL V.i.31man knows himself to be a fool.’ The heathen philosopher,knowes himselfe to be a Foole. The Heathen Philosopher,
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.110ever I satisfied man, and you shall be married tomorrow.euer I satisfi'd man, and you shall bee married to morrow.
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.42If any man doubt that, let him put me toIf any man doubt that, let him put mee to
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.58mine, sir, to take that that no man else will. Rich honestymine sir, to take that that no man else will rich honestie
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.157Where, meeting with an old religious man,Where, meeting with an old Religious man,
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.163.2Welcome, young man.Welcome yong man:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.97Nay, forward, old man; do not break off so,Nay forward old man, doe not breake off so,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.17Many a man would take you at your wordMany a man would take you at your word,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.7A man is master of his liberty.A man is Master of his libertie: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.20Man, more divine, the master of all these,Man more diuine, the Master of all these, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.43Here comes your man. Now is your husband nigh.Heere comes your man, now is your husband nie. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.112Wear gold, and no man that hath a nameWhere gold and no man that hath a name, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.48Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season,Was there euer anie man thus beaten out of season, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.77There's no time for a man toThere's no time for a man to 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.82and recover the lost hair of another man.and recouer the lost haire of another man. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.89man hath more hair than wit.man hath more haire then wit. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.90Not a man of those but he hathNot a man of those but he hath 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.215Whilst man and master laughs my woes to scorn.Whil'st man and Master laughes my woes to scorne: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.1.1Enter Antipholus of Ephesus, his man Dromio, Angelo Enter Antipholus of Ephesus, his man Dromio, Angelo
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.72It would make a man mad as a buck to be so bought and sold.It would make a man mad as a Bucke to be so bought and sold.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.75A man may break a word with you, sir, and words are but wind;A man may breake a word with your sir, and words are but winde: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.74Dromio? Am I your man? Am I myself?Dromio? Am I your man? Am I my selfe?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.76art my man, thou art thyself.art my man, thou art thy selfe.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.78man, and besides myself.man, and besides my selfe.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.79What woman's man? AndWhat womans man? and
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.93a one as a man may not speak of without he say ‘ sir-reverence.’ a one, as a man may not speake of, without he say sir reuerence,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.107nothing like so clean kept. For why? She sweats a mannothing like so cleane kept: for why? she sweats a man
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.162As from a bear a man would run for life,As from a Beare a man would run for life,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.186You are a merry man, sir. Fare you well.You are a merry man sir, fare you well.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.188But this I think: there's no man is so vainBut this I thinke, there's no man is so vaine,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.190I see a man here needs not live by shifts,I see a man heere needs not liue by shifts,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.22A man is well holp up that trusts to you.A man is well holpe vp that trusts to you,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.ii.41Why, man, what is the matter? Why man, what is the matter?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.1There's not a man I meet but doth salute meThere's not a man I meete but doth salute me 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.23that went like a bass viol in a case of leather; the man,that went like a Base-Viole in a case of leather; the man 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.31 – he that brings any man to answer it that breaks hishe that brings any man to answer it that breakes his 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.32band; one that thinks a man always going to bed, andBand: one that thinkes a man alwaies going to bed, and 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.58Your man and you are marvellous merry, sir.Your man and you are maruailous merrie sir. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.1Fear me not, man. I will not break away.Feare me not man, I will not breake away,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.8Here comes my man. I think he brings the money.Heere comes my Man, I thinke he brings the monie.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.52I charge thee, Satan, housed within this man,I charge thee Sathan, hous'd within this man,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.90Mistress, both man and master is possessed;Mistris, both Man and Master is possest,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.106Ay me, poor man, how pale and wan he looks.Aye me poore man, how pale and wan he looks.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.111Go bind this man, for he is frantic too.Go binde this man, for he is franticke too.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.113Hast thou delight to see a wretched manHast thou delight to see a wretched man
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.131I know the man. What is the sum he owes?I know the man: what is the summe he owes?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.4How is the man esteemed here in the city?How is the man esteem'd heere in the Citie? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.44How long hath this possession held the man?How long hath this possession held the man. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.46And much, much different from the man he was.And much different from the man he was: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.68And thereof came it that the man was mad.And thereof came it, that the man was mad. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.84To be disturbed would mad or man or beast.To be disturb'd, would mad or man, or beast: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.105To make of him a formal man again.To make of him a formall man againe: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.169My master and his man are both broke loose,My Master and his man are both broke loose, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.175His man with scissors nicks him like a fool.His man with Cizers nickes him like a foole: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.178Peace, fool; thy master and his man are here,Peace foole, thy Master and his man are here, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.242A living dead man. This pernicious slave,A liuing dead man. This pernicious slaue, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.249There left me and my man, both bound together,There left me and my man, both bound together, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.291Now am I Dromio, and his man, unbound.Now am I Dromio, and his man, vnbound. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.306and whatsoever a man denies you are now bound toand whatsoeuer a man denies, you are now bound to 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.331Most mighty Duke, behold a man much wronged.Most mightie Duke, behold a man much wrong'd. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.334And so, of these, which is the natural man,And so of these, which is the naturall man, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.342Speak, old Egeon, if thou beest the manSpeake olde Egeon, if thou bee'st the man 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.386And Dromio my man did bring them me.And Dromio my man did bring them me: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.387I see we still did meet each other's man,I see we still did meete each others man, 
CoriolanusCor I.i.135And, through the cranks and offices of man,And through the Crankes and Offices of man,
CoriolanusCor I.i.250Was ever man so proud as is this Martius?Was euer man so proud as is this Martius?
CoriolanusCor I.i.266To th' utmost of a man, and giddy censureTo th' vtmost of a man, and giddy censure
CoriolanusCor I.iii.17man.man.
CoriolanusCor I.iii.37Like to a harvest-man that's tasked to mowLike to a Haruest man, that task'd to mowe
CoriolanusCor I.iii.40Away, you fool! It more becomes a manAway you Foole; it more becomes a man
CoriolanusCor I.iv.14No, nor a man that fears you less than he:No, nor a man that feares you lesse then he,
CoriolanusCor I.v.10There is the man of my soul's hate, Aufidius,There is the man of my soules hate, Auffidious,
CoriolanusCor I.vi.27.1From every meaner man.From euery meaner man.
CoriolanusCor I.vi.34As with a man busied about decrees:As with a man busied about Decrees:
CoriolanusCor II.ii.33No more of him, he's a worthy man.No more of him, hee's a worthy man:
CoriolanusCor II.ii.84The man I speak of cannot in the worldThe man I speake of, cannot in the World
CoriolanusCor II.ii.95He proved best man i'th' field, and for his meedHe prou'd best man i'th' field, and for his meed
CoriolanusCor II.ii.120.2Worthy man!Worthy man.
CoriolanusCor II.iii.38man.man.
CoriolanusCor II.iii.100counterfeit the bewitchment of some popular man andcounterfet the bewitchment of some popular man, and
CoriolanusCor II.iii.154How now, my masters, have you chose this man?How now, my Masters, haue you chose this man?
CoriolanusCor II.iii.164.2No, no! No man saw 'em.No, no: no man saw 'em.
CoriolanusCor III.i.82.1A man of their infirmity.a man, of their Infirmity.
CoriolanusCor III.i.253This man has marred his fortune.This man ha's marr'd his fortune.
CoriolanusCor III.i.264.1Be every man himself?be euery man himself
CoriolanusCor III.ii.16.1The man I am.The man I am.
CoriolanusCor III.ii.19You might have been enough the man you areYou might haue beene enough the man you are,
CoriolanusCor IV.i.42O'er the vast world to seek a single man,O're the vast world, to seeke a single man,
CoriolanusCor IV.ii.18Was not a man my father? Hadst thou foxshipWas not a man my Father? Had'st thou Foxship
CoriolanusCor IV.ii.28Good man, the wounds that he does bear for Rome!Good man, the Wounds that he does beare for Rome!
CoriolanusCor IV.iii.43man, I think, that shall set them in present action. So,man I thinke, that shall set them in present Action. So
CoriolanusCor IV.v.57.1Why speak'st not? Speak, man. What's thy name?Why speak'st not? Speake man: What's thy name?
CoriolanusCor IV.v.59Think me for the man I am, necessitythinke me for the man I am, necessitie
CoriolanusCor IV.v.117I loved the maid I married; never manI lou'd the Maid I married: neuer man
CoriolanusCor IV.v.165simply the rarest man i'th' world.simply the rarest man i'th' world.
CoriolanusCor IV.v.181nations. I had as lief be a condemned man.Nations; I had as liue be a condemn'd man.
CoriolanusCor IV.v.211man I can imagine.man I can imagine.
CoriolanusCor IV.v.218crest up again and the man in blood, they will out of theirCrest vp againe, and the man in blood, they will out of their
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.93That shapes man better; and they follow himThat shapes man Better: and they follow him
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.110.1The noble man have mercy.The Noble man haue mercy.
CoriolanusCor IV.vii.39The happy man; whether defect of judgement,The happy man; whether detect of iudgement,
CoriolanusCor V.ii.88I will not hear thee speak. This man, Aufidius,I will not heare thee speake. This man Auffidius
CoriolanusCor V.iii.8.2This last old man,This last old man,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.36As if a man were author of himselfAs if a man were Author of himself,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.145Whose chronicle thus writ: ‘ The man was noble,Whose Chronicle thus writ, The man was Noble,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.158Than can our reasons. There's no man in the worldThen can our Reasons. There's no man in the world
CoriolanusCor V.iv.10condition of a man?condition of a man.
CoriolanusCor V.iv.13grown from man to dragon. He has wings; he's moregrowne from Man to Dragon: He has wings, hee's more
CoriolanusCor V.vi.11As with a man by his own alms empoisonedas with a man by his owne Almes impoyson'd,
CoriolanusCor V.vi.125The man is noble and his fame folds inThe man is Noble, and his Fame folds in
CymbelineCym I.i.1You do not meet a man but frowns: our bloodsYOu do not meet a man but Frownes. / Our bloods
CymbelineCym I.i.18I mean, that married her, alack good man,(I meane, that married her, alacke good man,
CymbelineCym I.i.24.1Endows a man, but he.Endowes a man, but hee.
CymbelineCym I.i.54.1What kind of man he is.what kind of man he is.
CymbelineCym I.ii.26Than doth become a man. I will remainThen doth become a man. I will remaine
CymbelineCym I.ii.77A man worth any woman: overbuys meA man, worth any woman: Ouer-buyes mee
CymbelineCym I.vii.69Can my sides hold, to think that man, who knowsCan my sides hold, to think that man who knowes
CymbelineCym II.i.1Was there ever man had such luck? When I kissedWas there euer man had such lucke? when I kist
CymbelineCym II.iii.1Your lordship is the most patient man in loss,Your Lordship is the most patient man in losse,
CymbelineCym II.iii.3It would make any man cold to lose.It would make any man cold to loose.
CymbelineCym II.iii.4But not every man patient after the noble temperBut not euery man patient after the noble temper
CymbelineCym II.iii.7Winning will put any man into courage. If I couldWinning will put any man into courage: if I could
CymbelineCym II.iv.110Where there's another man. The vows of womenWhere there's another man. The Vowes of Women,
CymbelineCym II.iv.155And that most venerable man, which IAnd that most venerable man, which I
CymbelineCym II.iv.173That tends to vice in man, but I affirmThat tends to vice in man, but I affirme
CymbelineCym III.ii.71Why, one that rode to's execution, man,Why, one that rode to's Execution Man,
CymbelineCym III.ii.79I see before me, man: nor here, nor here,I see before me (Man) nor heere, not heere;
CymbelineCym III.iv.3To see me first, as I have now – Pisanio! Man!To see me first, as I haue now. Pisanio, Man:
CymbelineCym III.iv.16And he's at some hard point. Speak, man, thy tongueAnd hee's at some hard point. Speake man, thy Tongue
CymbelineCym III.iv.19And you shall find me – wretched man – a thingAnd you shall finde me (wretched man) a thing
CymbelineCym III.iv.169.1A man already.A man already.
CymbelineCym III.v.55That man of hers, Pisanio, her old servant,That man of hers, Pisanio, her old Seruant
CymbelineCym III.v.115man: thou shouldst neither want my means for thyman: thou should'st neither want my meanes for thy
CymbelineCym III.vii.44He is a man, I'll love him as my brother:He is a man, Ile loue him as my Brother:
CymbelineCym IV.i.8for a man and his glass to confer in his own chamber;for a man, and his Glasse, to confer in his owne Chamber;
CymbelineCym IV.ii.3.2So man and man should be;So man and man should be,
CymbelineCym IV.ii.85The man that gave them thee. Thou art some fool,The man that gaue them thee. Thou art some Foole,
CymbelineCym IV.ii.110I mean, to man, he had not apprehensionI meane to man; he had not apprehension
CymbelineCym IV.ii.207Jove knows what man thou mightst have made: but I,Ioue knowes what man thou might'st haue made: but I,
CymbelineCym IV.ii.297This bloody man, the care on't. I hope I dream:This bloody man the care on't. I hope I dreame:
CymbelineCym IV.ii.308A headless man? The garments of Posthumus?A headlesse man? The Garments of Posthumus?
CymbelineCym IV.iv.36Did see man die, scarce ever looked on blood,Did see man dye, scarse euer look'd on blood,
CymbelineCym V.iii.52A narrow lane, an old man, and two boys.A narrow Lane, an old man, and two Boyes.
CymbelineCym V.iii.57Two boys, an old man twice a boy, a lane,"Two Boyes, an Oldman (twice a Boy) a Lane,
CymbelineCym V.iii.85'Tis thought the old man, and his sons, were angels.'Tis thought the old man, and his sonnes, were Angels.
CymbelineCym V.iii.86There was a fourth man, in a silly habit,There was a fourth man, in a silly habit,
CymbelineCym V.iv.24'Tween man and man they weigh not every stamp;'Tweene man, and man, they waigh not euery stampe:
CymbelineCym V.iv.30.2to Posthumus, an old man, attired like a warrior, leading in his handto Posthumus, an old man, attyred like a warriour, leading in his hand
CymbelineCym V.iv.52When once he was mature for man,When once he was mature for man,
CymbelineCym V.iv.175but a man that were to sleep your sleep, and abut a man that were to sleepe your sleepe, and a
CymbelineCym V.iv.190What an infinite mock is this, that a manWhat an infinite mocke is this, that a man
CymbelineCym V.iv.200Unless a man would marry a gallows, andVnlesse a man would marry a Gallowes, &
CymbelineCym V.v.152Than die ere I hear more: strive, man, and speak.Then dye ere I heare more: striue man, and speake.
CymbelineCym V.v.166A shop of all the qualities that manA shop of all the qualities, that man
CymbelineCym V.v.299.2That headless manThat headlesse man
CymbelineCym V.v.302This man is better than the man he slew,This man is better then the man he slew,
CymbelineCym V.v.320Assumed this age: indeed a banished man,Assum'd this age: indeed a banish'd man,
HamletHam I.ii.84For they are actions that a man might play.For they are actions that a man might play:
HamletHam I.ii.187'A was a man. Take him for all in all,He was a man, take him for all in all:
HamletHam I.iii.68Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice.Giue euery man thine eare; but few thy voyce:
HamletHam I.iii.72For the apparel oft proclaims the man,For the Apparell oft proclaimes the man.
HamletHam I.iii.80Thou canst not then be false to any man.Thou canst not then be false to any man.
HamletHam I.iv.34As infinite as man may undergo,
HamletHam I.v.65Holds such an enmity with blood of manHolds such an enmity with bloud of Man,
HamletHam I.v.121How say you then? Would heart of man once think it?How say you then, would heart of man once think it?
HamletHam I.v.130For every man hath business and desire,For euery man ha's businesse and desire,
HamletHam I.v.184And what so poor a man as Hamlet isAnd what so poore a man as Hamlet is,
HamletHam II.i.1Enter Polonius, with his man ReynaldoEnter Polonius, and Reynoldo.
HamletHam II.i.48.1Of man and country – Of man and Country.
HamletHam II.ii.6Sith nor th' exterior nor the inward manSince not th'exterior, nor the inward man
HamletHam II.ii.130As of a man faithful and honourable.As of a man, faithfull and Honourable.
HamletHam II.ii.176Then I would you were so honest a man.Then I would you were so honest a man.
HamletHam II.ii.179one man picked out of ten thousand.one man pick'd out of two thousand.
HamletHam II.ii.268of my servants. For, to speak to you like an honest man,of my seruants: for to speake to you like an honest man:
HamletHam II.ii.303of vapours. What a piece of work is a man,of vapours. What a piece of worke is a man!
HamletHam II.ii.308to me what is this quintessence of dust? Man delightsto me, what is this Quintessence of Dust? Man delights
HamletHam II.ii.313Why did ye laugh then, when I said ‘ ManWhy did you laugh, when I said, Man
HamletHam II.ii.316man, what lenten entertainment the players shallMan, what Lenton entertainment the Players shall
HamletHam II.ii.322sigh gratis; the humorous man shall end his part insigh gratis, the humorous man shall end his part in
HamletHam II.ii.384them. For they say an old man is twice a child.them: for they say, an old man is twice a childe.
HamletHam II.ii.527God's bodkin, man, much better! Use everyGods bodykins man, better. Vse euerie
HamletHam II.ii.528man after his desert, and who shall 'scape whipping?man after his desart, and who should scape whipping:
HamletHam III.ii.31nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have sonor the gate of Christian, Pagan, or Norman, haue so
HamletHam III.ii.44you have some again that keeps one suit of jests, as a man
HamletHam III.ii.52jest unless by chance, as the blind man catcheth a hare.
HamletHam III.ii.64Horatio, thou art e'en as just a manHoratio, thou art eene as iust a man
HamletHam III.ii.77A man that Fortune's buffets and rewardsA man that Fortunes buffets, and Rewards
HamletHam III.ii.81To sound what stop she please. Give me that manTo sound what stop she please. Giue me that man,
HamletHam III.ii.135man do but be merry? For look you how cheerfully myman do, but be merrie. For looke you how cheerefully my
HamletHam III.ii.145.7asleep, leaves him. Anon comes in another man; takesa-sleepe, leaues him. Anon comes in a Fellow, takes
HamletHam III.ii.214The great man down, you mark his favourite flies.The great man downe, you marke his fauourites flies,
HamletHam III.iii.41And like a man to double business boundAnd like a man to double businesse bound,
HamletHam III.iv.63To give the world assurance of a man.To giue the world assurance of a man.
HamletHam III.iv.212This man shall set me packing.This man shall set me packing:
HamletHam IV.i.12.1The unseen good old man.The vnseene good old man.
HamletHam IV.i.19This mad young man. But so much was our love,This mad yong man. But so much was our loue,
HamletHam IV.iii.2How dangerous is it that this man goes loose!How dangerous is it that this man goes loose:
HamletHam IV.iii.26A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a
HamletHam IV.iii.53My mother. Father and mother is man and wife;My Mother: Father and Mother is man and wife:
HamletHam IV.iii.54man and wife is one flesh; and so, my mother. Come,man & wife is one flesh, and so my mother. Come,
HamletHam IV.iv.29Why the man dies. I humbly thank you, sir.
HamletHam IV.iv.33And spur my dull revenge! What is a man,
HamletHam IV.v.129Speak, man.Speake man.
HamletHam V.i.16Here stands the man – good. If the man go to this waterheere stands the man; good: If the man goe to this water
HamletHam V.i.128What man dost thou dig it for?What man dost thou digge it for?
HamletHam V.i.129For no man, sir.For no man Sir.
HamletHam V.i.160sexton here, man and boy, thirty years.sixeteene heere, man and Boy thirty yeares.
HamletHam V.i.161How long will a man lie i'th' earth ere he rot?How long will a man lie 'ith' earth ere he rot?
HamletHam V.ii.57Why, man, they did make love to this employment.Why man, they did make loue to this imployment
HamletHam V.ii.138with him in excellence. But to know a man well were to
HamletHam V.ii.216now, yet it will come. The readiness is all. Since no mannow; yet it will come; the readinesse is all, since no man
HamletHam V.ii.336.2As th' art a man,As th'art a man, giue me the Cup.
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.89streets and no man regards it.no man regards it.
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.93knew thee Hal, I knew nothing, and now am I, if a manknew thee Hal, I knew nothing: and now I am (if a man
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.105for a man to labour in his vocation.for a man to labour in his Vocation.
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.109omnipotent villain that ever cried ‘ Stand!’ to a true man.omnipotent Villaine, that euer cryed, Stand, to a true man.
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.89For I shall never hold that man my friendFor I shall neuer hold that man my Friend,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.159Upon the head of this forgetful manVpon the head of this forgetfull man,
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.66 Nicholas, as truly as a man of falsehood may.Nicholas as truly as a man of falshood may.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.93our purchase, as I am a true man.our purpose, / As I am a true man.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.ii.22drink to turn true man, and to leave these rogues, I amto drinke, to turne True-man, and to leaue these Rogues, I am
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.ii.75Now, my masters, happy man be his dole, sayNow my Masters, happy man be his dole, say
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.ii.76I. Every man to his business.I: euery man to his businesse.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.121is nothing but roguery to be found in villainous man, yetis nothing but Roguery to be found in Villanous man; yet
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.135Why, you whoreson round man, what's theWhy you horson round man? what's the
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.158What, a hundred, man?What, a hundred, man?
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.164signum! I never dealt better since I was a man. All wouldsignum. I neuer dealt better since I was a man: all would
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.173You rogue, they were bound, every man ofYou Rogue, they were bound, euery man of
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.236would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.would giue no man a Reason vpon compulsion, I.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.280Marry my lord, there is a nobleman of the courtMarry, my Lord, there is a Noble man of the Court
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.284man and send him back again to my mother.man, and send him backe againe to my Mother.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.285What manner of man is he?What manner of man is hee?
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.286An old man.An old man.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.325sighing and grief, it blows a man up like a bladder.sighing and griefe, it blowes a man vp like a Bladder.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.409And yet there is a virtuous man whom I have often noted inand yet there is a vertuous man, whom I haue often noted in
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.411What manner of man, an it like your Majesty?What manner of man, and it like your Maiestie?
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.412A goodly portly man, i'faith, and a corpulent; of a cheerfulA goodly portly man yfaith, and a corpulent, of a chearefull
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.415And now I remember me, his name is Falstaff. If that manand now I remember mee, his Name is Falstaffe: if that man
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.436haunts thee in the likeness of an old fat man, a tun of man ishaunts thee, in the likenesse of a fat old Man; a Tunne of Man is
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.451My lord, the man I know.My Lord, the man I know.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.483another man, a plague on my bringing up! I hope I shallanother man, a plague on my bringing vp: I hope I shall
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.496.1A gross fat man.a grosse fat man.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.497The man I do assure you is not here,The man, I doe assure you, is not heere,
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.501Send him to answer thee, or any man,Send him to answere thee, or any man,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.47I think there's no man speaks better Welsh.I thinke there's no man speakes better Welsh:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.51Why, so can I, or so can any man:Why so can I, or so can any man:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.167I warrant you that man is not aliveI warrant you, that man is not aliue,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.37Is ruined, and the soul of every manIs ruin'd, and the Soule of euery man
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.30many a man doth of a death's-head, or a memento mori.many a man doth of a Deaths-Head, or a Memento Mori.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.55have enquired, so has my husband, man by man, boy byhaue enquired, so haz my Husband, Man by Man, Boy by
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.92doth thy husband? I love him well, he is an honest man.does thy Husband? I loue him well, hee is an honest man.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.106like a foul-mouthed man as he is, and said he wouldlike a foule-mouth'd man as hee is, and said, hee would
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.125Why? She's neither fish nor flesh, a man knowsWhy? She's neither fish nor flesh; a man knowes
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.127Thou art an unjust man in saying so, thou orThou art vniust man in saying so; thou, or
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.128any man knows where to have me, thou knave, thou.anie man knowes where to haue me, thou knaue thou.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.143Why Hal, thou knowest as thou art but man IWhy Hal? thou know'st, as thou art but a man, I
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.165have more flesh than another man, and therefore morehaue more flesh then another man, and therefore more
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.8In my heart's love hath no man than yourself.In my hearts loue, hath no man then your Selfe.
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.11No man so potent breathes upon the groundNo man so potent breathes vpon the ground,
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.ii.65Tush, man, mortal men, mortal men.tush man, mortall men, mortall men.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.107Both he, and they, and you, yea, every manBoth he, and they, and you; yea euery man
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.48And that no man might draw short breath todayAnd that no man might draw short breath to day,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.55He gave you all the duties of a man,He gaue you all the Duties of a Man,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.92Let each man do his best. And here draw ILet each man do his best. And heere I draw
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.103I could have better spared a better man.I could haue better spar'd a better man.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.115is but the counterfeit of a man who hath not the life ofis but the counterfeit of a man, who hath not the life of
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.116a man. But to counterfeit dying, when a man therebya man: But to counterfeit dying, when a man thereby
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.130Did you not tell me this fat man was dead?Did you not tell me this Fat man was dead?
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.136No, that's certain, I am not a double-man. ButNo, that's certaine: I am not a double man: but
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.151the man were alive, and would deny it, zounds, I wouldif the man were a-liue, and would deny it, I would
Henry IV Part 22H4 induction.38And not a man of them brings other newsAnd not a man of them brings other newes
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.70Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless,Euen such a man, so faint, so spiritlesse,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.190With well-appointed powers. He is a manWith well appointed Powres: he is a man
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.212Go in with me, and counsel every manGo in with me, and councell euery man
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.7brain of this foolish-compounded clay, man, is not ablebraine of this foolish compounded Clay-man, is not able
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.26writ man ever since his father was a bachelor. He maywrit man euer since his Father was a Batchellour. He may
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.38of keys at their girdles; and if a man is through withof Keyes at their girdles: and if a man is through with
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.79Why, sir, did I say you were an honest man?Why sir? Did I say you were an honest man?
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.85honest man.honest man.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.174to man, as the malice of this age shapes them, areto man (as the malice of this Age shapes them) are
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.218If ye will needs say I am an old man, you should give
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.231man can no more separate age and covetousness than 'aman can no more separate Age and Couetousnesse, then he
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.iii.65The utmost man of expectation,The vtmost man of expectation:
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.16will foin like any devil; he will spare neither man,will foyne like any diuell, he will spare neither man,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.79man of good temper would endure this tempest ofman of good temper would endure this tempest of
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.83Marry, if thou wert an honest man, thyself andMarry (if thou wer't an honest man) thy selfe, &
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.88liking his father to a singing-man of Windsor, thoulik'ning him to a singing man of Windsor; Thou
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.123if a man will make curtsy and say nothing, he isIf a man wil curt'sie, and say nothing, he is
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.44persistency. Let the end try the man. But I tell thee,persistencie. Let the end try the man. But I tell thee,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.53thou art a blessed fellow, to think as every man thinks.thou art a blessed Fellow, to thinke as euery man thinkes:
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.55better than thine. Every man would think me anbetter then thine: euery man would thinke me an
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.73What a maidenly man-at-arms are you become! Is'twhat a Maidenly man at Armes are you become? Is it
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.104man must know that as oft as he has occasion to nameman must know that, as oft as hee hath occasion to name
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.99Cheater, call you him? I will bar no honest manCheater, call you him? I will barre no honest man
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.260And look whether the fiery trigon his man be notAnd looke whether the fierie Trigon, his Man, be not
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.371when the man of action is called on. Farewell, goodwhen the man of Action is call'd on. Farewell good
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.379and truer-hearted man – well, fare thee well.and truer-hearted man--- Well, fare thee well.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.57This Percy was the man nearest my soul,This Percie was the man, neerest my Soule,
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.78The which observed, a man may prophesy,The which obseru'd, a man may prophecie
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.20Squele, a Cotsole man – you had not four such swinge-bucklersSquele a Cot-sal-man, you had not foure such Swindge-bucklers
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.63backsword man. How doth the good knight? May I askBack-Sword-man. How doth the good Knight? may I aske,
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.76heaven. Accommodated: that is, when a man is, as theyAccommodated: that is, when a man is (as they
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.77say, accommodated, or when a man is being whereby 'asay) accommodated: or, when a man is, being whereby he
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.176O Lord, sir, I am a diseased man.Oh sir, I am a diseased man.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.228By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once:I care not, a man can die but once:
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.230be my destiny, so; an't be not, so. No man's too goodbe my destinie, so: if it be not, so: no man is too good
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.251choose a man? Care I for the limb, the thews, thechuse a man? Care I for the Limbe, the Thewes, the
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.252stature, bulk, and big assemblance of a man? Give mestature, bulke, and bigge assemblance of a man? giue mee
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.258Shadow; give me this man: he presents no mark to theShadow, giue me this man: hee presents no marke to the
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.298Clement's Inn, like a man made after supper of aClements Inne, like a man made after Supper, of a
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.8Than now to see you here an iron man,Then now to see you heere an Iron man
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.11That man that sits within a monarch's heartThat man that sits within a Monarches heart,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.44.1To the last man.To the last man.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.11As good a man as he, sir, whoe'er I am. DoAs good a man as he sir, who ere I am: doe
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.87boy doth not love me, nor a man cannot makeBoy doth not loue me, nor a man cannot make
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.107to all the rest of this little kingdom, man, to arm; andto all the rest of this little Kingdome (Man) to Arme: and
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.25Doth the man of war stay all night, sir?Doth the man of Warre, stay all night sir?
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.39at his friend's request. An honest man, sir, is ableat his Friends request. An honest man sir, is able
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.43honest man, I have little credit with your worship. Thehonest man, I haue but a very litle credite with your Worshippe. The
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.67would curry with Master Shallow that no man couldwould currie with Maister Shallow, that no man could
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.30Though no man be assured what grace to find,Though no man be assur'd what grace to finde,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.108‘ Happy am I, that have a man so boldHappy am I, that haue a man so bold,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.36I did not think Master Silence had been a manI did not thinke M. Silence had bin a man
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.78Is't so? Why then, say an old man can doIs't so? Why then say an old man can do
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.86Not the ill wind which blows no man to good.Not the ill winde which blowes none to good,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.97I pray thee now, deliver them like a man ofI prethee now deliuer them, like a man of
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.117Harry the Fifth's the man. I speak the truth – Harry the Fift's the man, I speake the truth.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.6her; there hath been a man or two killed about her.her. There hath beene a man or two (lately) kill'd about her.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.16both, go with me, for the man is dead that you andboth go with me: for the man is dead, that you and
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.18I'll tell you what, you thin man in a censer, I willIle tell thee what, thou thin man in a Censor; I will
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.46vain man.vaine man.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.50I know thee not, old man. Fall to thy prayers.I know thee not, old man: Fall to thy Prayers:
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.52I have long dreamed of such a kind of man,I haue long dream'd of such a kinde of man,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.82your advancements; I will be the man yet that shallyour aduancement: I will be the man yet, that shall
Henry IV Part 22H4 epilogue.31martyr, and this is not the man. My tongue is weary;a Martyr, and this is not the man. My Tongue is wearie,
Henry VH5 I.chorus.24Into a thousand parts divide one man,Into a thousand parts diuide one Man,
Henry VH5 I.ii.99When the man dies, let the inheritanceWhen the man dyes, let the Inheritance
Henry VH5 I.ii.184The state of man in divers functions,The state of man in diuers functions,
Henry VH5 I.ii.278And plodded like a man for working-days;And plodded like a man for working dayes:
Henry VH5 I.ii.310Therefore let every man now task his thoughtTherefore let euery man now taske his thought,
Henry VH5 II.chorus.4Reigns solely in the breast of every man.Reignes solely in the breast of euery man.
Henry VH5 II.ii.8Nay, but the man that was his bedfellow,Nay, but the man that was his bedfellow,
Henry VH5 II.ii.19No doubt, my liege, if each man do his best.No doubt my Liege, if each man do his best.
Henry VH5 II.ii.40Enlarge the man committed yesterdayInlarge the man committed yesterday,
Henry VH5 II.ii.57Appear before us? We'll yet enlarge that man,Appeare before vs? Wee'l yet inlarge that man,
Henry VH5 II.ii.88Belonging to his honour; and this manBelonging to his Honour; and this man,
Henry VH5 II.ii.139To mark the full-fraught man and best enduedTo make thee full fraught man, and best indued
Henry VH5 II.ii.142Another fall of man. Their faults are open.Another fall of Man. Their faults are open,
Henry VH5 II.iii.10bosom, if ever man went to Arthur's bosom. 'A madeBosome, if euer man went to Arthurs Bosome: a made
Henry VH5 II.iii.17fields. ‘ How now, Sir John?’ quoth I, ‘ What, man, befields. How now Sir Iohn (quoth I?) what man? be
Henry VH5 III.i.3In peace there's nothing so becomes a manIn Peace, there's nothing so becomes a man,
Henry VH5 III.ii.30though they would serve me, could not be man to me;though they would serue me, could not be Man to me;
Henry VH5 III.ii.31for indeed three such antics do not amount to a man.for indeed three such Antiques doe not amount to a man:
Henry VH5 III.ii.64siege is given, is altogether directed by an Irishman, aSiege is giuen, is altogether directed by an Irish man, a
Henry VH5 III.ii.78his argument as well as any military man in the world, inhis Argument as well as any Militarie man in the World, in
Henry VH5 III.ii.125man as yourself, both in the disciplines of war, and inman as your selfe, both in the disciplines of Warre, and in
Henry VH5 III.ii.127I do not know you so good a man as myself.I doe not know you so good a man as my selfe:
Henry VH5 III.vi.7Agamemnon, and a man that I love and honour with myAgamemnon, and a man that I loue and honour with my
Henry VH5 III.vi.13think in my very conscience he is as valiant a man asthinke in my very conscience hee is as valiant a man as
Henry VH5 III.vi.14Mark Antony, and he is a man of no estimation in theMarke Anthony, and hee is a man of no estimation in the
Henry VH5 III.vi.19Here is the man.Here is the man.
Henry VH5 III.vi.41Let gallows gape for dog; let man go free,let Gallowes gape for Dogge, let Man goe free,
Henry VH5 III.vi.81he is not the man that he would gladly make show tohee is not the man that hee would gladly make shew to
Henry VH5 III.vi.93tell your majesty, the Duke is a prave man.tell your Maiestie, the Duke is a praue man.
Henry VH5 III.vi.97Duke hath lost never a man, but one that is like to beDuke hath lost neuer a man, but one that is like to be
Henry VH5 III.vi.99majesty know the man: his face is all bubukles, andMaiestie know the man: his face is all bubukles and
Henry VH5 III.vii.30Nay, the man hath no wit that cannot, from theNay, the man hath no wit, that cannot from the
Henry VH5 IV.i.99though I speak it to you, I think the King is but a man,though I speake it to you, I thinke the King is but a man,
Henry VH5 IV.i.103nakedness he appears but a man; and though hisNakednesse he appeares but a man; and though his
Henry VH5 IV.i.108man should possess him with any appearance of fear,man should possesse him with any appearance of feare;
Henry VH5 IV.i.174man in his bed, wash every mote out of his conscience;man in his Bed, wash euery Moth out of his Conscience:
Henry VH5 IV.i.181'Tis certain, every man that dies ill, the ill'Tis certaine, euery man that dyes ill, the ill
Henry VH5 IV.iii.23God's will! I pray thee wish not one man more.Gods will, I pray thee wish not one man more.
Henry VH5 IV.iii.30No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England:No 'faith, my Couze, wish not a man from England:
Henry VH5 IV.iii.32As one man more methinks would share from meAs one man more me thinkes would share from me,
Henry VH5 IV.iii.56This story shall the good man teach his son;This story shall the good man teach his sonne:
Henry VH5 IV.iii.72Perish the man whose mind is backward now!Perish the man, whose mind is backward now.
Henry VH5 IV.iii.93The man that once did sell the lion's skinThe man that once did sell the Lyons skin
Henry VH5 IV.vi.30But I had not so much of man in me,But I had not so much of man in mee,
Henry VH5 IV.vii.62And not a man of them that we shall takeAnd not a man of them that we shall take,
Henry VH5 IV.vii.112God, so long as your majesty is an honest man.God so long as your Maiesty is an honest man.
Henry VH5 IV.vii.152helm. If any man challenge this, he is a friend to Alençon,Helme: If any man challenge this, hee is a friend to Alanson,
Henry VH5 IV.vii.157the man that has but two legs that shall find himselfthe man, that ha's but two legges, that shall find himselfe
Henry VH5 IV.viii.31this man with my glove in his cap, and I have been asthis man with my Gloue in his Cappe, and I haue been as
Henry VH5 IV.viii.51appeared to me but as a common man – witness theappear'd to me but as a common man; witnesse the
Henry VH5 V.ii.353As man and wife, being two, are one in love,As Man and Wife being two, are one in loue,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.62What sayest thou, man, before dead Henry's corse?What say'st thou man, before dead Henry's Coarse?
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.103And while I live, I'll ne'er fly from a man.And while I liue, Ile ne're flye from a man.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.iv.30But with a baser man-of-arms by farBut with a baser man of Armes by farre,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.iv.71O Lord, have mercy on me, woeful man!O Lord haue mercy on me, wofull man.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.ii.42That she may boast she hath beheld the manThat she may boast she hath beheld the man,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.13And he is welcome. What? Is this the man?And he is welcome: what? is this the man?
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.47.1Why, art thou not the man?Why? art not thou the man?
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iv.2Dare no man answer in a case of truth?Dare no man answer in a Case of Truth?
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.3Even like a man new haled from the rack,Euen like a man new haled from the Wrack,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.20A man of thy profession and degree.A man of thy Profession, and Degree.
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.94My lord, we know your grace to be a manMy Lord, we know your Grace to be a man
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.55And twit with cowardice a man half dead?And twit with Cowardise a man halfe dead?
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.112What is the trust or strength of foolish man?What is the trust or strength of foolish man?
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iv.36Why, what is he? As good a man as York.Why, what is he? as good a man as Yorke.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.31And ill beseeming any common man,And ill beseeming any common man;
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.187But howsoe'er, no simple man that seesBut howsoere, no simple man that sees
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.31Lo, there thou standest, a breathing valiant manLoe, there thou standst a breathing valiant man
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.53Sell every man his life as dear as mine,Sell euery man his life as deere as mine,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iii.44But curse the cause I cannot aid the man.But curse the cause I cannot ayde the man.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iii.51That ever-living man of memory,That euer-liuing man of Memorie,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.i.18A man of great authority in France,A man of great Authoritie in France,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.37O, Charles the Dauphin is a proper man;Oh, Charles the Dolphin is a proper man,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.81Fond man, remember that thou hast a wife.Fond man, remember that thou hast a wife,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.85He talks at random. Sure the man is mad.He talkes at randon: sure the man is mad.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.21Peasant, avaunt! – You have suborned this manPezant auant. You haue suborn'd this man
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.79A married man! That's most intolerable.A married man, that's most intollerable.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.136Retain but privilege of a private man?Retaine but priuiledge of a priuate man?
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.184More like a soldier than a man o'th' church,More like a Souldier then a man o'th' Church,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.63Were I a man, a duke, and next of blood,Were I a Man, a Duke, and next of blood,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.68Where are you there? Sir John! Nay, fear not, man.Where are you there? Sir Iohn; nay feare not man,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.74What sayst thou, man? Hast thou as yet conferredWhat saist thou man? Hast thou as yet confer'd
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.85Here, Hume, take this reward. Make merry, man,Here Hume, take this reward, make merry man
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.1.1Enter four Petitioners, Peter, the armourer's man,Enter three or foure Petitioners, the Armorers Man
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.5for he's a good man. Jesu bless him!for hee's a good man, Iesu blesse him.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.16against John Goodman, my lord Cardinal's man, foragainst Iohn Goodman, my Lord Cardinals Man, for
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.158I say, my sovereign, York is meetest manI say, my Soueraigne, Yorke is meetest man
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.162That York is most unmeet of any man.That Yorke is most vnmeet of any man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.175Enter Horner the armourer and his man Peter, guardedEnter Armorer and his Man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.175Because here is a man accused of treason.Because here is a man accused of Treason,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.179Please it your majesty, this is the manPlease it your Maiestie, this is the man
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.184Say, man, were these thy words?Say man, were these thy words?
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.200honest man for a villain's accusation.honest man for a Villaines accusation.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.212pity my case. The spite of man prevaileth against me. Opitty my case: the spight of man preuayleth against me. O
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.8Yea, man and birds are fain of climbing high.Yea Man and Birds are fayne of climbing high.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.44Had not your man put up the fowl so suddenly,Had not your man put vp the Fowle so suddenly,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.57Enter a Man crying ‘ A miracle!’Enter one crying a Miracle.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.61Forsooth, a blind man at Saint Alban's shrineForsooth, a blinde man at Saint Albones Shrine,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.63A man that ne'er saw in his life before.A man that ne're saw in his life before.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.66.2with music, bearing the man Simpcox between twobearing the man betweene two
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.67To present your highness with the man.To present your Highnesse with the man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.ii.82The greatest man in England but the king.The greatest man in England, but the King.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.13With Sir John Stanley in the Isle of Man.With Sir Iohn Stanly, in the Ile of Man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.50The armourer and his man, to enter the lists,The Armorer and his Man, to enter the Lists,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.59.5door Peter his man, with a drum and sand-bag, andDoore his Man, with a Drumme and Sand-bagge, and
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.65neighbour. Drink, and fear not your man.Neighbor: drinke, and feare not your Man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.87honest man; and touching the Duke of York, I will takehonest man: and touching the Duke of Yorke, I will take
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.78To take her with him to the Isle of Man.To take her with him to the Ile of Man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.94Why, madam, that is to the Isle of Man,Why, Madame, that is to the Ile of Man,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.2'Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man,'Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.20And Humphrey is no little man in England.And Humfrey is no little Man in England.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.56No, no, my sovereign, Gloucester is a manNo, no, my Soueraigne, Glouster is a man
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.81Hangs on the cutting short that fraudful man.Hangs on the cutting short that fraudfull man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.209Thou never didst them wrong, nor no man wrong;Thou neuer didst them wrong, nor no man wrong:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.244Ah, York, no man alive so fain as I.Ah Yorke, no man aliue, so faine as I.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.335Let pale-faced fear keep with the mean-born man,Let pale-fac't feare keepe with the meane-borne man,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.4Didst ever hear a man so penitent?Didst euer heare a man so penitent?
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.24That faultless may condemn a noble man!That faultlesse may condemne a Noble man:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.72Ah, woe is me for Gloucester, wretched man!Ah woe is me for Gloster, wretched man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.170Staring full ghastly like a strangled man;Staring full gastly, like a strangled man:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.256And charge that no man should disturb your restAnd charge, that no man should disturbe your rest,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.34A cunning man did calculate my birth,A cunning man did calculate my birth,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.38He was an honest man and a good bricklayer.He was an honest man, and a good Bricklayer.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.76o'er, should undo a man? Some say the bee stings, but Iore, should vndoe a man. Some say the Bee stings, but I
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.78and I was never mine own man since. How now? Who'sand I was neuer mine owne man since. How now? Who's
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.88I am sorry for't. The man is a proper man, of mineI am sorry for't: The man is a proper man of mine
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.96man?man?
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.108be encountered with a man as good as himself. He isbe encountred with a man as good as himselfe. He is
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.vii.85Why dost thou quiver, man?Why dost thou quiuer man?
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.42Took odds to combat a poor famished man.Tooke oddes to combate a poore famisht man.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.71Kent from me she hath lost her best man, and exhortKent from me, she hath lost her best man, and exhort
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.71Tell me, my friend, art thou the man that slew him?Tell me my Friend, art thou the man that slew him?
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.110If they can brook I bow a knee to man.If they can brooke I bow a knee to man:
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.131To Bedlam with him! Is the man grown mad?To Bedlem with him, is the man growne mad.
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.185To do a murderous deed, to rob a man,To do a murd'rous deede, to rob a man,
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.216Ah, wretched man! Would I had died a maid,Ah wretched man, would I had dy'de a Maid?
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iii.9Lest thou be hated both of God and man.Least thou be hated both of God and Man.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iii.24He is a man, and, Clifford, cope with him.He is a man, and Clifford cope with him.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.89Why art thou patient, man? Thou shouldst be mad;Why art thou patient, man? thou should'st be mad:
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.29How many years a mortal man may live.How many Yeares, a Mortall man may liue.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.56This man whom hand to hand I slew in fightThis man whom hand to hand I slew in fight,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.60To some man else, as this dead man doth me. – To some man else, as this dead man doth me.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.65My father, being the Earl of Warwick's man,My Father being the Earle of Warwickes man,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.76Weep, wretched man; I'll aid thee tear for tear;Weepe wretched man: Ile ayde thee Teare for Teare,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.12Here comes a man; let's stay till he be past.Heere comes a man, let's stay till he be past:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.20No, not a man comes for redress of thee;No, not a man comes for redresse of thee:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.57A man at least, for less I should not be;A man at least, for lesse I should not be:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.81Why, am I dead? Do I not breathe a man?Why? Am I dead? Do I not breath a Man?
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.118Enter a NoblemanEnter a Noble man.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.121And go we, brothers, to the man that took him,And goe wee Brothers to the man that tooke him,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.163And am I then a man to be beloved?And am I then a man to be belou'd?
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.25Is of a king become a banished man,Is, of a King, become a banisht man,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.1Come on, my masters; each man take his stand.Come on my Masters, each man take his stand,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.9But say, I pray, what nobleman is thatBut say, I pray, what Noble man is that,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.v.15Nay, this way, man; see where the huntsmen stand.Nay this way man, / See where the Huntsmen stand.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.vii.13Tush, man, abodements must not now affright us;Tush man, aboadments must not now affright vs:
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.vii.31The good old man would fain that all were well,The good old man would faine that all were wel,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.vii.37What! Fear not, man, but yield me up the keys;What, feare not man, but yeeld me vp the Keyes,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iv.42And make him, naked, foil a man at arms.And make him, naked, foyle a man at Armes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iv.44For did I but suspect a fearful man,For did I but suspect a fearefull man,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.56He was a man; this, in respect, a child;He was a Man; this (in respect) a Childe,
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.32A man may weep upon his wedding-day.A Man may weepe vpon his Wedding day.
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.21Made Britain India; every man that stoodMade Britaine, India: Euery man that stood,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.89.2Every man,Euery man,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.134Self-mettle tires him. Not a man in EnglandSelfe-mettle tyres him: Not a man in England
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.100Free pardon to each man that has deniedFree pardon to each man that has deny'de
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.118Than ever they were fair. This man so complete,Then euer they were faire. This man so compleat,
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.187There's mischief in this man. Canst thou say further?There's mischiefe in this man; canst thou say further?
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.201.1And this man out of prison?And this man out of Prison.
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.54And see the noble ruined man you speak of.And see the noble ruin'd man you speake of.
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.125This from a dying man receive as certain:This from a dying man receiue as certaine:
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.5London, a man of my lord Cardinal's, by commission andLondon, a man of my Lord Cardinalls, by Commission, and
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.42.1This bold bad man.This bold bad man.
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.45Or this imperious man will work us allOr this imperious man will worke vs all
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.94One general tongue unto us, this good man,One generall Tongue vnto vs. This good man,
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.99They have sent me such a man I would have wished for.They haue sent me such a Man, I would haue wish'd for.
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.122.1Was he not held a learned man?Was he not held a learned man?
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.127Kept him a foreign man still, which so grieved himKept him a forraigne man still, which so greeu'd him,
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.140Would it not grieve an able man to leaveWould it not grieue an able man to leaue
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.134That man i'th' world who shall report he hasThat man i'th'world, who shall report he ha's
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.64Forgetting, like a good man, your late censureForgetting (like a good man) your late Censure
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.84That any Englishman dare give me counsel,That any English man dare giue me Councell?
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.162The prime man of the state? I pray you tell meThe prime man of the State? I pray you tell me,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.227And no man see me more.And no man see me more.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.274Dare mate a sounder man than Surrey can be,Dare mate a sounder man then Surrie can be,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.297How much, methinks, I could despise this man,How much me thinkes, I could despise this man,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.333Press not a falling man too far! 'Tis virtue.Presse not a falling man too farre: 'tis Vertue:
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.352This is the state of man: today he puts forthThis is the state of Man; to day he puts forth
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.356And when he thinks, good easy man, full surelyAnd when he thinkes, good easie man, full surely
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.367Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours!Is that poore man, that hangs on Princes fauours?
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.375A great man should decline? Nay, an you weepA great man should decline. Nay, and you weep
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.385Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven!Too heauy for a man, that hopes for Heauen.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.395But he's a learned man. May he continueBut he's a Learned man. May he continue
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.413I am a poor fall'n man, unworthy nowI am a poore falne man, vnworthy now
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.441By that sin fell the angels. How can man then,By that sinne fell the Angels: how can man then
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.70That ever lay by man; which when the peopleThat euer lay by man: which when the people
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.79And make 'em reel before 'em. No man livingAnd make 'em reele before 'em. No man liuing
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.109A man in much esteem with th' King, and trulyA man in much esteeme with th'King, and truly
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.14As a man sorely tainted, to his answer,As a man sorely tainted, to his Answer,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.16.2Alas, poor man.Alas poore man.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.21An old man, broken with the storms of state,An old man, broken with the stormes of State,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.33And yet with charity. He was a manAnd yet with Charity. He was a man
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.68Than man could give him, he died fearing God.Then man could giue him; he dy'de, fearing God.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.159Or let me lose the fashion of a man!Or let me loose the fashion of a man.
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.113.1Than I myself, poor man.Then I my selfe, poore man.
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.117What manner of man are you? My lord, I lookedWhat manner of man are you? My Lord, I look'd
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.152There make before them. Look, the good man weeps!There make before them. Looke, the goodman weeps:
Henry VIIIH8 V.ii.29A man of his place, and so near our favour,A man of his Place, and so neere our fauour
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.39A man that more detests, more stirs against,A man that more detests, more stirres against,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.50And by that virtue no man dare accuse you.And by that vertue no man dare accuse you.
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.55Where, being but a private man again,Where being but a priuate man againe,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.77.1To load a falling man.To load a falling man.
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.107.1Of this man to be vexed?Of this man to be vex'd?
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.111Against this man, whose honesty the devilAgainst this man, whose honesty the Diuell
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.130Good man, sit down. Now let me see the proudest,Good man sit downe: Now let me see the proudest
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.137Was it discretion, lords, to let this man,Was it discretion Lords, to let this man,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.138This good man – few of you deserve that title – This good man (few of you deserue that Title)
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.139This honest man, wait like a lousy footboyThis honest man, wait like a lowsie Foot-boy
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.171.1Embrace and love this man.Embrace, and loue this man.
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.174Good man, those joyful tears show thy true heart.Good Man, those ioyfull teares shew thy true hearts,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.1.1Noise and tumult within. Enter Porter and his ManNoyse and Tumult within: Enter Porter and his man.
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.33In her days every man shall eat in safetyIn her dayes, Euery Man shall eate in safety,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.64Thou hast made me now a man; never beforeThou hast made me now a man, neuer before
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.74She will be sick else. This day, no man thinkShe will be sicke els. This day, no man thinke
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.18.2What man is that?What man is that?
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.115Did I the tired Caesar. And this manDid I the tyred Casar: And this Man,
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.129A man of such a feeble temper shouldA man of such a feeble temper should
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.134Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow worldWhy man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.152But it was famed with more than with one man?But it was fam'd with more then with one man?
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.154That her wide walls encompassed but one man?That her wide Walkes incompast but one man?
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.156When there is in it but one only man.When there is in it but one onely man.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.199I do not know the man I should avoidI do not know the man I should auoyd
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.259no true man.no true man.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.264to cut. An I had been a man of any occupation, If Ito cut: and I had beene a man of any Occupation, if I
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.72Now could I, Casca, name to thee a manNow could I (Caska) name to thee a man,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.76A man no mightier than thyself, or me,A man no mightier then thy selfe, or me,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.104Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf,Poore man, I know he would not be a Wolfe,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.116You speak to Casca, and to such a manYou speake to Caska, and to such a man,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.155Is ours already, and the man entireIs ours alreadie, and the man entire
Julius CaesarJC II.i.67Are then in council; and the state of man,Are then in councell; and the state of a man,
Julius CaesarJC II.i.90Yes, every man of them; and no man hereYes, euery man of them; and no man here
Julius CaesarJC II.i.117And every man hence to his idle bed;And euery man hence, to his idle bed:
Julius CaesarJC II.i.119Till each man drop by lottery. But if these,Till each man drop by Lottery. But if these
Julius CaesarJC II.i.154Shall no man else be touched but only Caesar?Shall no man else be toucht, but onely Casar?
Julius CaesarJC II.i.251Which sometime hath his hour with every man.Which sometime hath his houre with euery man.
Julius CaesarJC II.i.310Here is a sick man that would speak with you.Heere is a sicke man that would speak with you.
Julius CaesarJC II.iv.36Will crowd a feeble man almost to death;Will crowd a feeble man (almost) to death:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.94Do so; and let no man abide this deedDo so, and let no man abide this deede,
Julius CaesarJC III.i.119.2Ay, every man away.I, euery man away.
Julius CaesarJC III.i.184Let each man render me his bloody hand.Let each man render me his bloody hand.
Julius CaesarJC III.i.256Thou art the ruins of the noblest manThou art the Ruines of the Noblest man
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.61I do entreat you, not a man depart,I do intreat you, not a man depart,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.83For Brutus is an honourable man;(For Brutus is an Honourable man,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.88And Brutus is an honourable man.And Brutus is an Honourable man.
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.95And Brutus is an honourable man.And Brutus is an Honourable man.
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.100And sure he is an honourable man.And sure he is an Honourable man.
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.117There's not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.There's not a Nobler man in Rome then Antony.
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.219But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,But (as you know me all) a plaine blunt man
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.243To every several man, seventy-five drachmas.To euery seuerall man, seuenty fiue Drachmaes.
Julius CaesarJC III.iii.8Are you a married man or a bachelor?Are you a married man, or a Batchellor?
Julius CaesarJC III.iii.9Answer every man directly.Answer euery man directly.
Julius CaesarJC III.iii.14do I dwell? Am I a married man or a bachelor? Then todo I dwell? Am I a married man, or a Batchellour? Then to
Julius CaesarJC III.iii.15answer every man directly and briefly, wisely and truly;answer euery man, directly and breefely, wisely and truly:
Julius CaesarJC IV.i.12This is a slight unmeritable man,This is a slight vnmeritable man,
Julius CaesarJC IV.i.19And though we lay these honours on this man,And though we lay these Honours on this man,
Julius CaesarJC IV.ii.50Lucius, do you the like, and let no manLucillius, do you the like, and let no man
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.5Because I knew the man, were slighted off.Because I knew the man was slighted off.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.22That struck the foremost man of all this worldThat strucke the Formost man of all this World,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.37Away, slight man!Away slight man.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.145No man bears sorrow better. Portia is dead.No man beares sorrow better. Portia is dead.
Julius CaesarJC V.i.60Young man, thou couldst not die more honourable.Yong-man, thou could'st not dye more honourable.
Julius CaesarJC V.i.122Why then, lead on. O, that a man might knowWhy then leade on. O that a man might know
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.102To this dead man than you shall see me pay.To this dead man, then you shall see me pay.
Julius CaesarJC V.iv.27A prize no less in worth. Keep this man safe;A prize no lesse in worth; keepe this man safe,
Julius CaesarJC V.v.35I found no man but he was true to me.I found no man, but he was true to me.
Julius CaesarJC V.v.52What man is that?What man is that?
Julius CaesarJC V.v.53My master's man. Strato, where is thy master?My Masters man. Strato, where is thy Master?
Julius CaesarJC V.v.57And no man else hath honour by his death.And no man else hath Honor by his death.
Julius CaesarJC V.v.75And say to all the world, ‘ This was a man!’And say to all the world; This was a man.
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.31That I, a Frenchman, should discover this;That I a French man should discouer this,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.89Defiance, Frenchman? We rebound it back,Defiance French man we rebound it backe,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.19Commend us, as the man in ChristendomCommend vs as the man in Christendome,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.57Jemmy, my man, saddle my bonny black.Iemmy my man, saddle my bonny blacke.
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.179The sick man best sets down the pangs of death,The sick man best sets downe the pangs of death,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.180The man that starves the sweetness of a feast,The man that starues the sweetnes of a feast,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.266By God was honoured for a married man,By God was honored for a married man,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.306O, that a man might hold the heart's close bookO that a man might hold the hartes close booke,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.333That he hath broke his faith with God and man,That hee hath broke his faith with God and man,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.335What office were it to suggest a manWhat office were it to suggest a man,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.337An office for the devil, not for man.An office for the deuill not for man,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.435The greater man, the greater is the thing,The greater man, the greater is the thing,
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.13Content thee, man; they are far enough from hence,Content thee man, they are farre enough from hence,
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.46Enter a FrenchmanEnter a French man.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.1Where's the Frenchman by whose cunning guideWheres the French man by whose cunning guide,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.31And he is labouring for a knighthood, man.And he is laboring for a knighthood man.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.46Audley, content. I will not have a man,Audley content, I will not haue a man,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.ii.84But now 'tis past that no man can recall,But now tis past that no man can recall,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iii.6Thy ransom, man? Why need'st thou talk of that?Thy ransome man: why needest thou talke of that?
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iii.35Why, is it lawful for a man to kill,Why is it lawfull for a man to kill,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.52Are but a power. When we name a man,Are but a power, when we name a man,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.80To urge the plea of mercy to a man,To vrge the plea of mercie to a man,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.131Thou art a married man in this distress,Thou art a married man in this distresse.
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.150Ah, good old man, a thousand thousand armoursAh good olde man, a thousand thousand armors,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.85Nor that same man doth never break his wordNor that same man doth neuer breake his worde,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.53.2Even as a man may doEuen as a man may do
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.57And, in the worst, ends but a mortal man.and in the worst ends but a mortall man,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vii.44Cheerily, bold man, thy soul is all too proudCheerely bold man, thy soule is all to proud,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.89This man doth please me, and I like his words;This man doth please mee, and I like his words,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.214Accursed man! Of this I was foretold,Accursed man, of this I was fortolde,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.218That, as thy pleasure chose me for the manThat as thy pleasure chose me for the man,
King JohnKJ I.i.64Out on thee, rude man! Thou dost shame thy mother,Out on thee rude man, yu dost shame thy mother,
King JohnKJ I.i.88In the large composition of this man?In the large composition of this man?
King JohnKJ I.i.193My picked man of countries: ‘ My dear sir ’ – My picked man of Countries: my deare sir,
King JohnKJ I.i.225Colbrand the Giant, that same mighty man?Colbrand the Gyant, that same mighty man,
King JohnKJ I.i.250Some proper man, I hope. Who was it, mother?Some proper man I hope, who was it mother?
King JohnKJ II.i.239Son to the elder brother of this man,Sonne to the elder brother of this man,
King JohnKJ II.i.437He is the half part of a blessed man,He is the halfe part of a blessed man,
King JohnKJ III.i.8Is but the vain breath of a common man.Is but the vaine breath of a common man:
King JohnKJ III.i.9Believe me, I do not believe thee, man;Beleeue me, I doe not beleeue thee man,
King JohnKJ III.i.37This news hath made thee a most ugly man.This newes hath made thee a most vgly man.
King JohnKJ III.i.130O that a man should speak those words to me!O that a man should speake those words to me.
King JohnKJ III.i.166Purchase corrupted pardon of a man,Purchase corrupted pardon of a man,
King JohnKJ III.iii.72Hubert shall be your man, attend on youHubert shall be your man, attend on you
King JohnKJ III.iv.109Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man,Vexing the dull eare of a drowsie man;
King JohnKJ IV.ii.69This is the man should do the bloody deed;This is the man should do the bloody deed:
King JohnKJ IV.iii.33'Tis true – to hurt his master, no man else.'Tis true, to hurt his master, no mans else.
King LearKL I.i.146When Lear is mad. What wouldst thou do, old man?When Lear is mad, what wouldest thou do old man?
King LearKL I.ii.127man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of aman, to lay his Goatish disposition on the charge of a
King LearKL I.ii.170man if there be any good meaning toward you. I haveman, if ther be any good meaning toward you:I haue
King LearKL I.iii.17Not to be overruled. Idle old man,
King LearKL I.iv.10A man, sir.A man Sir.
King LearKL I.iv.319This man hath had good counsel! A hundred knights!This man hath had good Counsell, / A hundred Knights?
King LearKL I.v.23what a man cannot smell out he may spy into.what a man cannot smell out, he may spy into.
King LearKL II.ii.54man?man?
King LearKL II.ii.118And put upon him such a deal of manAnd put vpon him such a deale of Man,
King LearKL II.iii.8That ever penury, in contempt of man,That euer penury in contempt of man,
King LearKL II.iv.9loins, and men by the legs. When a man's overlusty atloynes, and Men by'th'legs: when a man ouerlustie at
King LearKL II.iv.41Having more man than wit about me, drew.Hauing more man then wit about me, drew;
King LearKL II.iv.72wise man gives thee better counsel, give me mine again;wiseman giues thee better counsell giue me mine againe,
King LearKL II.iv.79And let the wise man fly.And let the wiseman flie:
King LearKL II.iv.94‘ Informed them ’! Dost thou understand me, man?Inform'd them? Do'st thou vnderstand me man.
King LearKL II.iv.107For the sound man. – Death on my state! whereforeFor the sound man. Death on my state: wherefore
King LearKL II.iv.177.1Who put my man i'the stocks?Who put my man i'th'Stockes?
King LearKL II.iv.193Will you yet hold? – How came my man i'the stocks?Will you yet hold? / How came my man i'th'Stockes?
King LearKL II.iv.267You see me here, you gods, a poor old man,You see me heere (you Gods) a poore old man,
King LearKL II.iv.283This house is little; the old man and's peopleThis house is little, the old man an'ds people,
King LearKL II.iv.290Followed the old man forth. He is returned.Followed the old man forth, he is return'd.
King LearKL III.i.10Strives in his little world of man to out-storm
King LearKL III.ii.9That makes ingrateful man!That makes ingratefull Man.
King LearKL III.ii.20A poor, infirm, weak, and despised old man.A poore, infirme, weake, and dispis'd old man:
King LearKL III.ii.31The man that makes his toeThe man yt makes his Toe,
King LearKL III.ii.41man and a fool.and a Foole.
King LearKL III.ii.45And make them keep their caves. Since I was man,And make them keepe their Caues: Since I was man,
King LearKL III.ii.59These dreadful summoners grace. I am a manThese dreadfull Summoners grace. I am a man,
King LearKL III.iv.99uncovered body this extremity of the skies. Is man novncouer'd body, this extremitie of the Skies. Is man no
King LearKL III.iv.103Thou art the thing itself! Unaccommodated man is noThou art the thing it selfe; vnaccommodated man, is no
King LearKL III.iv.157He said it would be thus, poor banished man!He said it would be thus: poore banish'd man:
King LearKL III.iv.178I smell the blood of a British man.’I smell the blood of a Brittish man.
King LearKL III.vi.36Thou robed man of justice, take thy place.
King LearKL III.vii.99.1If this man come to good.
King LearKL IV.i.9Enter Gloucester, led by an Old ManEnter Glouster, and an Old man.
King LearKL IV.i.33Which made me think a man a worm. My sonWhich made me thinke a Man, a Worme. My Sonne
King LearKL IV.i.66Let the superfluous and lust-dieted manLet the superfluous, and Lust-dieted man,
King LearKL IV.i.70And each man have enough. Dost thou know Dover?And each man haue enough. Dost thou know Douer?
King LearKL IV.ii.3Madam, within; but never man so changed.Madam within, but neuer man so chang'd:
King LearKL IV.ii.26O, the difference of man and man!Oh, the difference of man, and man,
King LearKL IV.ii.41A father, and a gracious aged man,
King LearKL IV.ii.45A man, a prince, by him so benefited?
King LearKL IV.ii.50.2Milk-livered man!Milke-Liuer'd man,
King LearKL IV.vi.78I took it for a man; often 'twould sayI tooke it for a man: often 'twould say
King LearKL IV.vi.151What, art mad? A man may see how this world goesWhat, art mad? A man may see how this world goes,
King LearKL IV.vi.196Why, this would make a man a man of salt,Why, this would make a man, a man of Salt
King LearKL IV.vi.221A most poor man made tame to fortune's blows,A most poore man, made tame to Fortunes blows
King LearKL IV.vi.240come not near th' old man; keep out, che vor' ye, or I'cecome not neere th'old man: keepe out che vor'ye, or ice
King LearKL IV.vii.60I am a very foolish fond old man,I am a very foolish fond old man,
King LearKL IV.vii.64Methinks I should know you, and know this man;Me thinkes I should know you, and know this man,
King LearKL IV.vii.69For, as I am a man, I think this ladyFor (as I am a man) I thinke this Lady
King LearKL V.i.5Our sister's man is certainly miscarried.Our Sisters man is certainely miscarried.
King LearKL V.i.38If e'er your grace had speech with man so poor,If ere your Grace had speech with man so poore,
King LearKL V.ii.5Away, old man! Give me thy hand; away!Away old man, giue me thy hand, away:
King LearKL V.ii.8No further, sir; a man may rot even here.No further Sir, a man may rot euen heere.
King LearKL V.iii.109If any man of quality or degree within theIf any man of qualitie or degree, within the
King LearKL V.iii.206Whilst I was big in clamour, came there in a man,
King LearKL V.iii.220.3Speak, man.Speake man.
King LearKL V.iii.223Who dead? Speak, man.Who dead? Speake man.
King LearKL V.iii.284No, my good lord; I am the very manNo my good Lord, I am the very man.
King LearKL V.iii.288Nor no man else. All's cheerless, dark, and deadly.Nor no man else: / All's cheerlesse, darke, and deadly,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.128Item: if any man be seen to talk with a woman within theItem, If any man be seene to talke with a woman within the
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.149For every man with his affects is born,For euery man with his affects is borne,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.162A man in all the world's new fashion planted,A man in all the worlds new fashion planted,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.166A man of compliments, whom right and wrongA man of complements whom right and wrong
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.176A man of fire-new words, fashion's own knight.A man of fire, new words, fashions owne Knight.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.207manner of a man to speak to a woman. For the ‘ form ’manner of a man to speake to a woman, for the forme
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.214Such is the simplicity of man to hearken afterSuch is the simplicitie of man to harken after
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.224Be to me and every man that dares not fight.Be to me, and euery man that dares not fight.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.258Anthony Dull, a man of good repute, carriage, bearing,Anthony Dull, a man of good repute, carriage, bearing,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.1Boy, what sign is it when a man of great spiritBoy, What signe is it when a man of great spirit
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.44complete man.compleat man.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.68Samson, master: he was a man of good carriage –Sampson Master, he was a man of good carriage,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.128Man.Man.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.159as little patience as another man, and therefore I canas little patience as another man, and therefore I can
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.6Of all perfections that a man may owe,Of all perfections that a man may owe,
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.39.2Know you the man?Know you the man?
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.44A man of sovereign parts he is esteemed;A man of soueraigne parts he is esteem'd:
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.66Berowne they call him – but a merrier man,Berowne they call him, but a merrier man,
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.18on a spit, or your hands in your pocket like a man afteron a spit, or your hands in your pocket, like a man after
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.38A man, if I live; and this ‘ by,’ ‘ in,’ and ‘ without,’A man, if I liue (and this) by, in, and without,
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.143a man buy for a remuneration?a man buy for a remuneration?
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.121was a man when King Pepin of France was a little boy,was a man when King Pippin of France was a little boy,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.127Thou canst not hit it, my good man.Thou canst not hit it my good man.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.145Armado to th' one side – O, a most dainty man!Armathor ath to the side, O a most dainty man.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.ii.123Naso was the man; and why indeed ‘ Naso ’ but forNaso was the man. And why in deed Naso, but for
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.185A true man or a thief that gallops so?A true man, or a theefe, that gallops so.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.220That, like a rude and savage man of IndeThat (like a rude and sauage man of Inde.)
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.274I never knew man hold vile stuff so dear.I neuer knew man hold vile stuffe so deere.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.351Then homeward every man attach the handThen homeward euery man attach the hand
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.i.58Offered by a child to an old man – which isOffered by a childe to an olde man: which is
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.i.102a soldier, a man of travel, that hath seen the world –a Souldier, a man of trauell, that hath seene the world:
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.128And not a man of them shall have the grace,And not a man of them shall haue the grace
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.177That some plain man recount their purposes.That some plaine man recount their purposes.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.215Yet still she is the moon, and I the man.Yet still she is the Moone, and I the Man.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.338Till this man showed thee, and what art thou now?Till this madman shew'd thee? And what art thou now?
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.500own part, I am, as they say, but to parfect one man inowne part, I am (as they say, but to perfect one man in
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.501one poor manPompion the Great, sir.one poore man) Pompion the great sir.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.522Doth this man serve God?Doth this man serue God?
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.524'A speaks not like a man of God his making.He speak's not like a man of God's making.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.577There, an't shall please you, a foolish mild man; anThere an't shall please you: a foolish milde man, an
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.578honest man, look you, and soon dashed. He is a marvelloushonest man, looke you, & soon dasht. He is a maruellous
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.651A man so breathed that certain he would fight, yea,A man so breathed, that certaine he would fight: yea
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.660breathed, he was a man. But I will forward with myBut I will forward with my
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.691I will not fight with a pole like a northern man.I wil not fight with a pole like a Northern man;
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.832Proclaims you for a man replete with mocks,Proclaimes you for a man repleate with mockes,
MacbethMac I.ii.1What bloody man is that? He can report,What bloody man is that? he can report,
MacbethMac I.iii.21He shall live a man forbid.He shall liue a man forbid:
MacbethMac I.iii.42That man may question? You seem to understand meThat man may question? you seeme to vnderstand me,
MacbethMac I.iii.139Shakes so my single state of manShakes so my single state of Man,
MacbethMac I.vii.46I dare do all that may become a man;I dare do all that may become a man,
MacbethMac I.vii.49When you durst do it, then you were a man;When you durst do it, then you were a man:
MacbethMac I.vii.51Be so much more the man. Nor time nor placeBe so much more the man. Nor time, nor place
MacbethMac II.iii.1Here's a knocking indeed! If a man were porter ofHere's a knocking indeede: if a man were Porter of
MacbethMac II.iii.106Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man.Loyall, and Neutrall, in a moment? No man:
MacbethMac II.iii.134Which the false man does easy. I'll to England.Which the false man do's easie. Ile to England.
MacbethMac II.iv.1Enter Ross with an Old ManEnter Rosse, with an Old man.
MacbethMac III.i.40Let every man be master of his timeLet euery man be master of his time,
MacbethMac III.i.68Given to the common enemy of man,Giuen to the common Enemie of Man,
MacbethMac III.i.88To pray for this good man and for his issue,to pray for this good man, / And for his Issue,
MacbethMac III.iv.57Feed, and regard him not. – Are you a man?Feed, and regard him not. Are you a man?
MacbethMac III.iv.78That, when the brains were out, the man would die,That when the Braines were out, the man would dye,
MacbethMac III.iv.98What man dare, I dare.What man dare, I dare:
MacbethMac III.iv.107I am a man again. – Pray you sit still.I am a man againe: pray you sit still.
MacbethMac III.iv.125The secret'st man of blood. What is the night?The secret'st man of Blood. What is the night?
MacbethMac IV.i.79The power of man; for none of woman bornThe powre of man: For none of woman borne
MacbethMac IV.iii.208What, man! Ne'er pull your hat upon your brows.What man, ne're pull your hat vpon your browes:
MacbethMac IV.iii.219.1Dispute it like a man.Dispute it like a man.
MacbethMac IV.iii.220But I must also feel it as a man.But I must also feele it as a man;
MacbethMac V.i.38Yet who would have thought the old man to have had soyet who would haue thought the olde man to haue had so
MacbethMac V.ii.5.1Excite the mortified man.Excite the mortified man.
MacbethMac V.iii.6‘ Fear not, Macbeth; no man that's born of womanFeare not Macbeth, no man that's borne of woman
MacbethMac V.vi.23Brandished by man that's of a woman born.Brandish'd by man that's of a Woman borne.
MacbethMac V.vi.57For it hath cowed my better part of man;For it hath Cow'd my better part of man:
MacbethMac V.vi.79He only lived but till he was a man;He onely liu'd but till he was a man,
MacbethMac V.vi.82.1But, like a man, he died.But like a man he dy'de.
Measure for MeasureMM I.i.71Nor do I think the man of safe discretionNor doe I thinke the man of safe discretion
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.85Yonder man is carried to prison.Yonder man is carried to prison.
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.94What proclamation, man?What proclamation, man?
Measure for MeasureMM I.iii.12A man of stricture and firm abstinence,(A man of stricture and firme abstinence)
Measure for MeasureMM I.iv.57Governs Lord Angelo, a man whose bloodGouernes Lord Angelo; A man, whose blood
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.84man, prove it.man, proue it.
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.98very man, having eaten the rest, as I said, and, as Ivery man, hauing eaten the rest (as I said) & (as I
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.118sir; a man of fourscore pound a year, whose father diedsir, a man of foure-score pound a yeare; whose father died
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.136I beseech you, sir, ask him what this man did toI beseech you Sir, aske him what this man did to
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.160time is yet to come that she was ever respected with man,time is yet to come that shee was euer respected with man,
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.18Here is the sister of the man condemnedHere is the sister of the man condemn'd,
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.50And neither heaven nor man grieve at the mercy.And neither heauen, nor man grieue at the mercy.
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.79.1Like man new made.Like man new made.
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.117Than the soft myrtle; but man, proud man,Then the soft Mertill: But man, proud man,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iii.13And he that got it, sentenced: a young manAnd he that got it, sentenc'd: a yong man,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iii.24Love you the man that wronged you?Loue you the man that wrong'd you?
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.10Wherein, let no man hear me, I take pride,Wherein (let no man heare me) I take pride,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.44A man already made as to remitA man already made, as to remit
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.154.1What man thou art.What man thou art.
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.141Wilt thou be made a man out of my vice?Wilt thou be made a man, out of my vice?
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.235it will let this man live! But how out of this can she avail?it will let this man liue? But how out of this can shee auaile?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.12this man made you, sir?this man made you, Sir?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.48man? Which is the way? Is it sad, and few words?Man? Which is the way? Is it sad, and few words?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.99Angelo was not made by man and woman after thisAngelo was not made by Man and Woman, after this
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.109rebellion of a codpiece to take away the life of a man!rebellion of a Cod-peece, to take away the life of a man?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.111would have hanged a man for the getting a hundredwould haue hang'd a man for the getting a hundred
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.182Your honour is accounted a merciful man, good myyour Honor is accounted a mercifull man: good my
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.259O, what may man within him hide,Oh, what may Man within him hide,
Measure for MeasureMM IV.i.8Here comes a man of comfort, whose adviceHere comes a man of comfort, whose aduice
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.3If the man be a bachelor, sir, I can; but if he be aIf the man be a Bachelor Sir, I can: / But if he be a
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.4married man, he's his wife's head, and I can never cutmarried man, he's his wiues head, / And I can neuer cut
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.41be too little for your thief, your true man thinks it bigbe too little for your theefe, your true man thinkes it bigge
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.98This is his lordship's man.This is his Lords man.
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.139A man that apprehends death no more dreadfullyA man that apprehends death no more dreadfully,
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.14dagger man, and young Drop-heir that killed lustydagger man, and yong Drop-heire that kild lustie
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.70A man of Claudio's years, his beard and headA man of Claudio's yeares: his beard, and head
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.111The better, given me by so holy a man.The better giuen me by so holy a man,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.128I do not like the man. Had he been lay, my lord,I doe not like the man: had he been Lay my Lord,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.144I know him for a man divine and holy,I know him for a man diuine and holy,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.147And, on my trust, a man that never yetAnd on my trust, a man that neuer yet
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.159To justify this worthy nobleman,To iustifie this worthy Noble man
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.305To accuse this worthy man but, in foul mouth,To accuse this worthy man? but in foule mouth,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.323Is this the man that you did tell us of?Is this the man you did tell vs of?
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.397For this new-married man approaching here,For this new-maried man, approaching here,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.423I crave no other, nor no better man.I craue no other, nor no better man.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.441Look, if it please you, on this man condemnedLooke if it please you, on this man condemn'd,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.476There was a friar told me of this man.There was a Friar told me of this man.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.498One all of luxury, an ass, a madman,One all of Luxurie, an asse, a mad man:
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.78A stage where every man must play a part,A stage, where euery man must play a part,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.83Why should a man whose blood is warm withinWhy should a man whose bloud is warme within,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.115more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as twomore then any man in all Venice, his reasons are two
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.ii.54man. In truth, I know it is a sin to be a mocker, but he,man, in truth I know it is a sinne to be a mocker, but he,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.ii.57every man in no man. If a throstle sing, he falls straighteuery man in no man, if a Trassell sing, he fals straight
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.ii.83is best he is a little worse than a man, and when he isis best, he is a little worse then a man, and when he is
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.12Antonio is a good man.Anthonio is a good man.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.16is a good man is to have you understand me that he isis a good man, is to haue you vnderstand me that he is
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.24is the peril of waters, winds, and rocks. The man is,is the perrill of waters, windes, and rocks: the man is
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.57Your worship was the last man in our mouths.Your worship was the last man in our mouthes.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.153Why fear not, man; I will not forfeit it.Why feare not man, I will not forfaite it,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.162A pound of man's flesh taken from a manA pound of mans flesh taken from a man,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.i.33Which is the better man, the greater throwWhich is the better man, the greater throw
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.29Master young man, you I pray you, which is theMaister yong-man, you I praie you, which is the
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.47though I say't, is an honest exceeding poor man and,though I say't is an honest exceeding poore man, and
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.52But I pray you, ergo old man, ergo I beseechBut I praie you ergo old man, ergo I beseech
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.71own child. Well, old man, I will tell you news of yourowne childe. Well, old man, I will tell you newes of your
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.82am Launcelot, the Jew's man, and I am sure Margeryam Lancelet the Iewes man, and I am sure Margerie
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.103O rare fortune, here comes the man! To him, father, forO rare fortune, here comes the man, to him Father, for
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.113Not a poor boy, sir, but the rich Jew's manNot a poore boy sir, but the rich Iewes man that
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.123being I hope an old man, shall frutify unto you ...being I hope an old man shall frutifie vnto you.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.128man, and though I say it, though old man, yet poor man,man, and though I say it, though old man, yet poore man
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.147any man in Italy have a fairer table which doth offer toanie man in Italie haue a fairer table which doth offer to
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.151maids is a simple coming-in for one man. And then tomaides is a simple comming in for one man, and then to
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.v.1.1Enter Shylock the Jew and Launcelot, his man thatEnter Iew, and his man that
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vii.67Many a man his life hath soldMany a man his life hath sold
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.viii.1Why, man, I saw Bassanio under sail:Why man I saw Bassanio vnder sayle,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.67Enter a Man from AntonioEnter a man from Anthonio.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.71Exeunt Solanio, Salerio, and ManExeunt Gentlemen.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.104'Tween man and man. But thou, thou meagre lead'Tweene man and man: but thou, thou meager lead
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.247Of any constant man. What, worse and worse?Of any constant man. What, worse and worse?
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.275A creature that did bear the shape of manA creature that did beare the shape of man
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.276So keen and greedy to confound a man.So keene and greedy to confound a man.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.292The dearest friend to me, the kindest man,The deerest friend to me, the kindest man,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.1.2a Man of Portia'sa man of Portias.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.48And use thou all th' endeavour of a manAnd vse thou all the indeauor of a man,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.66And speak between the change of man and boyAnd speake betweene the change of man and boy,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.v.53thee understand a plain man in his plain meaning: gothee vnderstand a plaine man in his plaine meaning: goe
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.63This is no answer, thou unfeeling man,This is no answer thou vnfeeling man,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.67Hates any man the thing he would not kill?Hates any man the thing he would not kill?
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.111Good cheer, Antonio! What, man, courage yet!Good cheere Anthonio. What man, corage yet:
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.238There is no power in the tongue of manThere is no power in the tongue of man
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.243O noble judge! O excellent young man!O noble Iudge, O excellent yong man.
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.266To let the wretched man outlive his wealthTo let the wretched man out-liue his wealth,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.24But hark, I hear the footing of a man.But harke, I heare the footing of a man.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.43Leave holloaing, man! Here.Leaue hollowing man, heere.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.83The man that hath no music in himself,The man that hath no musicke in himselfe,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.88Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.Let no such man be trusted: marke the musicke.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.112He knows me as the blind man knows the cuckoo,He knowes me as the blinde man knowes the / Cuckow
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.134This is the man, this is Antonio,This is the man, this is Anthonio,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.159He will, an if he live to be a man.He wil, and if he liue to be a man.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.160Ay, if a woman live to be a man.I, if a Woman liue to be a man.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.183And neither man nor master would take aughtAnd neyther man nor master would take ought
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.203What man is there so much unreasonable,What man is there so much vnreasonable,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.283Unless he live until he be a man.Vnlesse he liue vntill he be a man.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.18It agrees well, passant. It is a familiar beast to man, andit agrees well passant: It is a familiar beast to man, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.126Where's Simple, my man? Can you tell,Where's Simple my man? can you tell,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.252 (To Simple) Go, sirrah, for all you are my man, go waitgoe, Sirha, for all you are my man, goe wait
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.255friend for a man. I keep but three men and a boy yet,friend, for a Man; I keepe but three Men, and a Boy yet,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.271at it as any man in England. You are afraid if you see theat it, as any man in England: you are afraid if you see the
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.23A softly-sprighted man, is he not?A softly-sprighted man, is he not?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.24Ay, forsooth. But he is as tall a man of his handsI forsooth: but he is as tall a man of his hands,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.37good young man; go into this closet. He will not staygood young man: goe into this Closset: he will not stay
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.48found the young man, he would have been horn-mad.found the yong man he would haue bin horne-mad.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.63Ay me, he'll find the young manAy-me, he'll finde the yong man
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.70The young man is an honest man.The yong man is an honest man.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.71What shall de honest man do in my closet? Dere isWhat shall de honest man do in my Closset: dere is
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.72no honest man dat shall come in my closet.no honest man dat shall come in my Closset.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.91man, I'll do you your master what good I can.man, Ile doe yoe your Master what good I can:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.76man.man.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.96man too. He's as far from jealousy as I am from givingman too: hee's as farre from iealousie, as I am from giuing
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.136priest o'th' town commended him for a true man.Priest o'th'Towne commended him for a true man.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.174to turn them together. A man may be too confident. Ito turne them together: a man may be too confident: I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.29I do relent. What wouldst thou more of man?I doe relent: what would thou more of man?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.87jealousy man – she leads a very frampold life with him,iealousie-man; she leads a very frampold life with him,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.100man. Surely, I think you have charms, la! Yes, inman; surely I thinke you haue charmes, la: yes in
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.113honest man. Never a wife in Windsor leads a betterhonest man: neuer a wife in Windsor leades a better
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.175you – and you have been a man long known to me,you) and you haue been a man long knowne to me,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.228man may, you may as soon as any.man may, you may as soone as any.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.276hour is fixed, the match is made. Would any man havehowre is fixt, the match is made: would any man haue
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.34He is the wiser man, Master Doctor. He is aHe is the wiser man (M. Docto)rhe is a
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.39fighter, though now a man of peace.fighter, though now a man of peace.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.53never heard a man of his place, gravity, and learning soneuer heard a man of his place, grauity, and learning, so
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.64I warrant you, he's the man should fight with him.I warrant you, hee's the man should fight with him.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.5I had rather, forsooth, go before you like a manI had rather (forsooth) go before you like a man,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.23is such a league between my good man and he. Is youris such a league betweene my goodman, and he: is your
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.33Falstaff's boy with her. A man may hear this shower singFalstaffes boy with her: A man may heare this showre sing
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.94honest man to your husband, to give him such cause ofhonest man to your husband, to giue him such cause of
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.106such a man here! But 'tis most certain your husband'ssuch a man heere: but 'tis most certaine your husband's
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.62motions. If it be my luck, so; if not, happy man be hismotions: if it be my lucke, so; if not, happy man bee his
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.14death that I abhor, for the water swells a man, and whata death that I abhorre: for the water swelles a man; and what
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.46think what a man is. Let her consider his frailty, andthinke what a man is: Let her consider his frailety, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.105man of my kidney – think of that – that am as subject toman of my Kidney; thinke of that, that am as subiect to
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.106heat as butter; a man of continual dissolution and thaw.heate as butter; a man of continuall dissolution, and thaw:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.i.8bring my young man here to school. Look where hisbring my yong-man here to Schoole: looke where his
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.40he's but a dead man. What a woman are you! Awayhee's but a dead man. What a woman are you? Away
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.135Why, man, why?Why man, why?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.136Master Page, as I am a man, there was one conveyedMaster Page, as I am a man, there was one conuay'd
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.141If you find a man there, he shall die aIf you find a man there, he shall dye a
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.143Here's no man.Heer's no man.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.33Marry, she says that the very same man thatMarry shee sayes, that the very same man that
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.15a poor old man. But I came from her, Master Brook, likea poore-old-man, but I came from her (Master Broome) like
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.20shape of man, Master Brook, I fear not Goliath with ashape of Man (Master Broome) I feare not Goliah with a
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.ii.12well. Heaven prosper our sport! No man means evil butwel: Heauen prosper our sport. No man means euill but
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.5respects makes a beast a man, in some other a man arespects makes a Beast a Man: in som other, a Man a
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.48I'll wink and couch; no man their works must eye.Ile winke, and couch: No man their workes must eie.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.80But stay – I smell a man of middle earth.But stay, I smell a man of middle earth.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.151A puffed man?A puft man?
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.25This man hath my consent to marry her.This man hath my consent to marrie her.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.27This man hath bewitched the bosom of my child.This man hath bewitch'd the bosome of my childe:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.110Upon this spotted and inconstant man.Vpon this spotted and inconstant man.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.147And – ere a man hath power to say ‘ Behold!’ – And ere a man hath power to say, behold,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.2You were best to call them generally, man by You were best to call them generally, man by
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.3man, according to the scrip.man according to the scrip.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.80is a sweet-faced man; a proper man as one shall see in ais a sweet-fac'd man, a proper man as one shall see in a
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.81summer's day; a most lovely, gentlemanlike man. Thereforesummers day; a most louely Gentleman-like man, therfore
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.171Will make or man or woman madly doteWill make or man or woman madly dote
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.263May be the lady. Thou shalt know the manMay be the Lady. Thou shalt know the man,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.121The will of man is by his reason swayed,The will of man is by his reason sway'd:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.131Is't not enough, is't not enough young manIst not enough, ist not enough, yong man,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.139O, that a lady of one man refusedOh, that a Lady of one man refus'd,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.40thing. I am a man, as other men are ’ – and there indeed thing, I am a man as other men are; and there indeed
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.61Some man or other must present Wall; and letSome man or other must present wall, and let
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.91Ninus' tomb ’, man! – Why, you must not speakNinus toombe man: why, you must not speake
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.125Whose note full many a man doth markWhose note full many a man doth marke,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.42This is the woman, but not this the man.This is the woman, but not this the man.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.92Then fate o'errules, that, one man holding truth,Then fate ore-rules, that one man holding troth,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.259But yet come not. (To Lysander) You are a tame man, go.But yet come not: you are a tame man, go.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.348Did not you tell me I should know the manDid not you tell me, I should know the man,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.459That every man should take his own,That euery man should take his owne,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.463The man shall have his mare again, and all shall be well.The man shall haue his Mare againe, and all shall bee well.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.204dream past the wit of man to say what dream it was. Mandreame, past the wit of man, to say, what dreame it was. Man
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.206I was – there is no man can tell what. MethoughtI was, there is no man can tell what. Me-thought
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.207I was – and methought I had – but man is but a patchedI was, and me-thought I had. But man is but a patch'd
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.209eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen,eye of man hath not heard, the eare of man hath not seen,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.7It is not possible. You have not a man in allIt is not possible: you haue not a man in all
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.10man in Athens.man in Athens.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.33Meet presently at the palace. Every man look o'er hismeete presently at the Palace, euery man looke ore his
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.10That is the madman. The lover, all as frantic,That is the mad man. The Louer, all as franticke,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.128This man is Pyramus, if you would know;This man is Piramus, if you would know;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.130This man with lime and roughcast doth presentThis man, with lyme and rough-cast, doth present
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.133To whisper. At the which let no man wonder.To whisper. At the which, let no man wonder.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.134This man with lantern, dog, and bush of thornThis man, with Lanthorne, dog, and bush of thorne,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.214two noble beasts in: a man and a lion.two noble beasts, in a man and a Lion.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.238Myself the man i'th' moon do seem to be.My selfe, the man i'th Moone doth seeme to be.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.239This is the greatest error of all the rest; the manThis is the greatest error of all the rest; the man
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.240should be put into the lanthorn. How is it else the manShould be put into the Lanthorne. How is it els the man
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.251lantern is the moon, I the man i'th' moon, this thornLanthorne is the Moone; I, the man in the Moone; this thorne
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.281would go near to make a man look sad.Would go neere to make a man looke sad.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.282Beshrew my heart, but I pity the man.Beshrew my heart, but I pittie the man.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.300Less than an ace, man; for he is dead. He isLesse then an ace man. For he is dead, he is
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.311which Thisbe is the better – he for a man, God warrantwhich Thisby is the better.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.52A lord to a lord, a man to a man, stuffed withA Lord to a Lord, a man to a man, stuft with
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.54It is so, indeed; he is no less than a stuffed man;It is so indeed, he is no lesse then a stuft man:
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.62whole man governed with one; so that if he have witwhole man gouern'd with one: so that if hee haue wit
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.102this what you are, being a man. Truly, the lady fathersthis, what you are, being a man, truely the Lady fathers
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.123I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swearI had rather heare my Dog barke at a Crow, than a man sweare
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.156Do you question me as an honest man shouldDoe you question me as an honest man should
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.173carpenter? Come, in what key shall a man take you to goCarpenter: Come, in what key shall a man take you to goe
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.185one man but he will wear his cap with suspicion? Shallone man but he will weare his cap with suspition? shall
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.195dumb man, I would have you think so; but, on my allegiance,dumbe man, I would haue you thinke so (but on my allegiance,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.247Benedick the married man.’Benedicke the married man.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.1Enter Leonato and Antonio, meetingEnter Leonato and an old man, brother to Leonato.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.9mine orchard, were thus much overheard by a man ofmy orchard, were thus ouer-heard by a man of
Much Ado About NothingMA I.iii.17man in his humour.man in his humor.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.iii.29man, it must not be denied but I am a plain-dealingman) it must not be denied but I am a plaine dealing
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.6He were an excellent man that were made justHee were an excellent man that were made iust
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.14money enough in his purse, such a man would win anymoney enough in his purse, such a man would winne any
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.32no beard is less than a man; and he that is more than ano beard, is lesse then a man: and hee that is more then a
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.33youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I amyouth, is not for mee: and he that is lesse then a man, I am
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.105were the very man. Here's his dry hand up and down;were the very man: here's his dry hand vp & down,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.151do the part of an honest man in it.do the part of an honest man in it.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.182Ho! Now you strike like the blind man; 'twasHo now you strike like the blindman, 'twas
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.225impossible conveyance upon me that I stood like a manimpossible conueiance vpon me, that I stood like a man
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.236she is here, a man may live as quiet in hell as in a sanctuary,she is heere, a man may liue as quiet in hell, as in a sanctuary,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.8I do much wonder that one man, seeing how muchI doe much wonder, that one man seeing how much
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.9another man is a fool when he dedicates his behavioursanother man is a foole, when he dedicates his behauiours
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.12scorn by falling in love; and such a man is Claudio. Iscorne, by falling in loue, & such a man is Claudio, I
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.19honest man and a soldier, and now is he turned orthography;honest man & a souldier) and now is he turn'd orthography,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.95did never think that lady would have loved any man.did neuer thinke that Lady would haue loued any man.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.179her love, 'tis very possible he'll scorn it; for the man,her loue, 'tis very possible hee'l scorne it, for the man
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.181He is a very proper man.He is a very proper man.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.194And so will he do, for the man doth fear God,And so will he doe, for the man doth fear God,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.231but doth not the appetite alter? A man loves the meat inbut doth not the appetite alter? a man loues the meat in
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.234man from the career of his humour? No, the world mustman from the careere of his humour? No, the world must
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.19To praise him more than ever man did merit.To praise him more then euer man did merit,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.48As much as may be yielded to a man;As much as may be yeelded to a man:
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.59Why, you speak truth. I never yet saw man,Why you speake truth, I neuer yet saw man,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.68So turns she every man the wrong side out,So turnes she euery man the wrong side out,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.92He is the only man of Italy,He is the onely man of Italy,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.40Hath any man seen him at the barber's?Hath any man seene him at the Barbers?
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.41No, but the barber's man hath been seen withNo, but the Barbers man hath beene seen with
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.9First, who think you the most desartless manFirst, who thinke you the most desartlesse man
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.14blessed you with a good name. To be a well-favouredblest you with a good name: to be a wel-fauoured man,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.15man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comesis the gift of Fortune, but to write and reade, comes
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.22are thought here to be the most senseless and fit manare thought heere to be the most senslesse and fit man
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.25vagrom men; you are to bid any man stand, in thevagrom men, you are to bid any man stand in the
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.50virtue of your office, to be no true man; and, for suchvertue of your office, to be no true man: and for such
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.59You have been always called a merciful man,You haue bin alwaies cal'd a merciful mã
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.62much more a man who hath any honesty in him.much more a man who hath anie honestie in him.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.76Five shillings to one on't, with any man thatFiue shillings to one on't with anie man that
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.79offend no man, and it is an offence to stay a man againstoffend no man, and it is an offence to stay a man against
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.96Here, man, I am at thy elbow.Here man, I am at thy elbow.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.116cloak, is nothing to a man.cloake, is nothing to a man.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.124like a gentleman. I remember his name.like a gentle man: I remember his name.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.136out more apparel than the man. But art not thou thyselfout more apparrell then the man; but art not thou thy selfe
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iv.24'Twill be heavier soon, by the weight of a man.'Twill be heauier soone, by the waight of a man.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iv.80man; he swore he would never marry, and yet now, inman, he swore hee would neuer marry, and yet now in
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.10matter – an old man, sir, and his wits are not so blunt as,matter, an old man sir, and his wits are not so blunt, as
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.13Yes, I thank God I am as honest as any man livingYes I thank God, I am as honest as any man liuing,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.14that is an old man and no honester than I.that is an old man, and no honester then I.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.25of any man in the city; and though I be but a poor man,of any man in the Citie, and though I bee but a poore man,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.32A good old man, sir, he will be talking; as theyA good old man sir, hee will be talking as they
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.35well, God's a good man; an two men ride of a horse, onewell, God's a good man, and two men ride of a horse, one
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.81What man was he talked with you yesternightWhat man was he, talkt with you yesternight,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.84I talked with no man at that hour, my lord.I talkt with no man at that howre my Lord.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.174Lady, what man is he you are accused of?Ladie, what man is he you are accus'd of?
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.176If I know more of any man aliveIf I know more of any man aliue
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.179Prove you that any man with me conversedProue you that any man with me conuerst,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.258Ah, how much might the man deserve of meAh, how much might the man deserue of mee
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.262May a man do it?May a man doe it?
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.299O that I were a man! What, bear her in hand until theyO that I were a man! what, beare her in hand vntill they
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.302I were a man! I would eat his heart in the market-place.I were a man! I would eat his heart in the market-place.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.304Talk with a man out at a window! A properTalke with a man out at a window, a proper
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.312surely! O that I were a man for his sake, or that I hadsurelie, O that I were a man for his sake! or that I had
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.313any friend would be a man for my sake! But manhoodany friend would be a man for my sake! But manhood
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.317swears it. I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore Isweares it: I cannot be a man with wishing, therfore I
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.ii.37This man said, sir, that Don John,This man said sir, that Don Iohn
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.20But there is no such man; for, brother, menBut there is no such man, for brother, men
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.50Nay, do not quarrel with us, good old man.Nay, do not quarrell with vs, good old man.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.58Tush, tush, man, never fleer and jest at me;Tush, tush, man, neuer fleere and iest at me,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.66Do challenge thee to trial of a man.Doe challenge thee to triall of a man,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.73.1You say not right, old man.You say not right old man.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.79If thou kill'st me, boy, thou shalt kill a man.If thou kilst me, boy, thou shalt kill a man.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.89That dare as well answer a man indeedThat dare as well answer a man indeede,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.92Hold you content. What, man! I know them, yea,Hold you content, what man? I know them, yea
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.109See, see; here comes the man we went to seek.See, see, here comes the man we went to seeke.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.129As I am an honest man, he looks pale.As I am an honest man he lookes pale,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.131What, courage, man! What though care killedWhat, courage man: what though care kil'd
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.165she concluded with a sigh, thou wast the properest manshe concluded with a sigh, thou wast the proprest man
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.177the married man ’?the married man.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.192What a pretty thing man is when he goes inWhat a prettie thing man is, when he goes in
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.195a doctor to such a man.a Doctor to such a man.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.224man how Don John your brother incensed me to slanderman, how Don Iohn your brother incensed me to slander
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.247That, when I note another man like him,That when I note another man like him,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.263And yet, to satisfy this good old man,And yet to satisfie this good old man,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.284Tonight I take my leave. This naughty manTo night I take my leaue, this naughtie man
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.6In so high a style, Margaret, that no man livingIn so high a stile Margaret, that no man liuing
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.9To have no man come over me! Why, shall ITo haue no man come ouer me, why, shall I
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.68one wise man among twenty that will praise himself.one wise man among twentie that will praise himselfe.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.70the time of good neighbours. If a man do not erect inthe time of good neighbours, if a man doe not erect in
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.1.2Ursula, Friar Francis, and HeroVrsula, old man, Frier, Hero.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.44Tush, fear not, man, we'll tip thy horns with gold,Tush, feare not man, wee'll tip thy hornes with gold,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.98How dost thou, Benedick, the married man?How dost thou Benedicke the married man?
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.101think I care for a satire or an epigram? No; if a man willthink I care for a Satyre or an Epigram? no, if a man will
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.106have said against it; for man is a giddy thing, and thishaue said against it: for man is a giddy thing, and this
OthelloOth I.i.10Off-capped to him: and by the faith of man,Off-capt to him: and by the faith of man
OthelloOth I.iii.71Here is the man: this Moor, whom now it seemsHere is the man; this Moore, whom now it seemes
OthelloOth I.iii.162That heaven had made her such a man. She thanked me,That Heauen had made her such a man. She thank'd me,
OthelloOth I.iii.176Light on the man! Come hither, gentle mistress;Light on the man. Come hither gentle Mistris,
OthelloOth I.iii.281A man he is of honesty and trust:A man he is of honesty and trust:
OthelloOth I.iii.310a benefit and an injury, I never found a man that knewa Benefit, and an Iniurie: I neuer found man that knew
OthelloOth I.iii.332the will. Come, be a man. Drown thyself? Drown catsthe will. Come, be a man: drowne thy selfe? Drown Cats,
OthelloOth I.iii.386Cassio's a proper man: let me see now;Cassio's a proper man: Let me see now,
OthelloOth II.i.35For I have served him, and the man commandsFor I haue seru'd him, and the man commands
OthelloOth II.ii.3the mere perdition of the Turkish fleet, every man putthe meere perdition of the Turkish Fleete: euery man put
OthelloOth II.ii.5bonfires, each man to what sport and revels his addictionBonfires, each man, to what Sport and Reuels his addition
OthelloOth II.iii.39What, man! 'Tis a night of revels; the gallants desireWhat man? 'Tis a night of Reuels, the Gallants desire
OthelloOth II.iii.66A soldier's a manA Souldiers a man:
OthelloOth II.iii.102nor any man of quality – I hope to be saved.nor any man of qualitie: I hope to be saued.
OthelloOth II.iii.259As I am an honest man I thought you had receivedAs I am an honest man I had thought you had receiued
OthelloOth II.iii.264repute yourself such a loser. What, man! There arerepute your selfe such a looser. What man, there are
OthelloOth II.iii.297man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast! O, strange!man, by and by a Foole, and presently a Beast. Oh strange!
OthelloOth II.iii.304You or any man living may be drunk at a time, man.You, or any man liuing, may be drunke at a time man.
OthelloOth III.iii.43A man that languishes in your displeasure.A man that languishes in your displeasure.
OthelloOth III.iii.121Are tricks of custom; but in a man that's just,Are trickes of Custome: but in a man that's iust,
OthelloOth III.iii.128Why, then, I think Cassio's an honest man.Why then I thinke Cassio's an honest man.
OthelloOth III.iii.154Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,Good name in Man, & woman (deere my Lord)
OthelloOth III.iii.371Are you a man? Have you a soul? Or sense?Are you a Man? Haue you a Soule? or Sense?
OthelloOth III.iv.4Why, man?Why man?
OthelloOth III.iv.89You'll never meet a more sufficient man.you'l neuer meete a more sufficient man.
OthelloOth III.iv.91.2A man that all his timeA man that all his time
OthelloOth III.iv.96.1Is not this man jealous?Is not this man iealious?
OthelloOth III.iv.99'Tis not a year or two shows us a man.'Tis not a yeare or two shewes vs a man:
OthelloOth IV.i.13She may, I think, bestow't on any man.She may (I thinke) bestow't on any man.
OthelloOth IV.i.61Would you would bear your fortune like a man!Would you would beare your Fortune like a Man.
OthelloOth IV.i.65.2Good sir, be a man.Good Sir, be a man:
OthelloOth IV.i.77A passion most unsuiting such a man(A passion most resulting such a man)
OthelloOth IV.i.89.1And nothing of a man.And nothing of a man.
OthelloOth IV.i.110I never knew woman love man so.I neuer knew woman loue man so.
OthelloOth IV.ii.17There's no man happy. The purest of their wivesThere's no man happy. The purest of their Wiues
OthelloOth IV.ii.133Fie, there is no such man! It is impossible.Fie, there is no such man: it is impossible.
OthelloOth IV.ii.192Very well, go to! I cannot go to, man, nor 'tisVery well, go too: I cannot go too, (man) nor tis
OthelloOth IV.iii.34This Lodovico is a proper man.This Lodouico is a proper man.
OthelloOth IV.iii.35.1A very handsome man.A very handsome man.
OthelloOth V.i.10'Tis but a man gone. Forth my sword! He dies!'Tis but a man gone. Forth my Sword: he dies.
OthelloOth V.i.99Some good man bear him carefully from hence.Some good man beare him carefully from hence,
OthelloOth V.i.103None in the world, nor do I know the man.None in the world: nor do I know the man?
OthelloOth V.ii.50.1Send for the man and ask him.send for the man, / And aske him.
OthelloOth V.ii.147An honest man he is, and hates the slimeAn honest man he is, and hates the slime
OthelloOth V.ii.171Disprove this villain, if thou be'st a man:Disproue this Villaine, if thou bee'st a man:
OthelloOth V.ii.268Man but a rush against Othello's breast,Man but a Rush against Othello's brest,
OthelloOth V.ii.280Where is this rash and most unfortunate man?Where is this rash, and most vnfortunate man?
PericlesPer Chorus.I.13And that to hear an old man singAnd that to heare an old man sing,
PericlesPer I.i.20You gods that made me man, and sway in love,You Gods that made me man, and sway in loue;
PericlesPer I.i.80For he's no man on whom perfections waitFor hee's no man on whom perfections waite,
PericlesPer I.i.83Who, fingered to make man his lawful music,Who finger'd to make man his lawfull musicke,
PericlesPer I.iii.7reason for't, for if a king bid a man be a villain, he'sreason for't: for if a king bidde a man bee a villaine, hee's
PericlesPer I.iv.45So sharp are hunger's teeth that man and wifeSo sharpe are hungers teeth, that man and wife,
PericlesPer Chorus.II.11Is still at Tarsus, where each manIs still at Tharstill, where each man,
PericlesPer Chorus.II.35All perishen of man, of pelf,All perishen of man, of pelfe,
PericlesPer II.i.2Wind, rain, and thunder, remember earthly manWind, Raine, and Thunder, remember earthly man
PericlesPer II.i.38Why, man?Why, Man?
PericlesPer II.i.59A man whom both the waters and the wind,A man whom both the Waters and the Winde,
PericlesPer II.i.73A man thronged up with cold; my veins are chill,A man throng'd vp with cold, my Veines are chill,
PericlesPer II.i.77For that I am a man, pray see me buried.For that I am a man, pray you see me buried.
PericlesPer II.i.115and what a man cannot get, he may lawfully deal for hisand what a man can not get, he may lawfully deale for his
PericlesPer II.i.132Till the rough seas, that spares not any man,Till the rough Seas, that spares not any man,
PericlesPer II.ii.56The outward habit by the inward man.The outward habit, by the inward man.
PericlesPer II.iv.17See, not a man in private conferenceSee, not a man in priuate conference,
PericlesPer II.v.86Man and wife.Man and wife:
PericlesPer III.ii.30Making a man a god. 'Tis known I everMaking a man a god: / T'is knowne, I euer
PericlesPer IV.ii.17What else, man? The stuff we have, a strong windWhat else man? the stuffe we haue, a strong winde
PericlesPer IV.vi.23iniquity have you, that a man may deal withal andiniquitie haue you, that a man may deale withall, and
PericlesPer IV.vi.47honourable man.Honorable man.
PericlesPer IV.vi.50Next, he's the governor of this country, and a manNext hees the Gouernor of this countrey, and a man
PericlesPer IV.vi.136The nobleman would have dealt with her like aThe Noble man would haue dealt with her like a
PericlesPer IV.vi.137nobleman, and she sent him away as cold as a snowball,Noble man, and shee sent him away as colde as a Snoweball,
PericlesPer IV.vi.169would you? where a man may serve seven years for thewold you? wher a man may serue 7. yeers for the
PericlesPer V.i.12This is the man that can in aught you wouldthis is the man that can in ought you would
PericlesPer V.i.22A man who for this three months hath not spokena man, who for this three moneths hath not spoken
PericlesPer V.i.136Of my endurance, thou art a man, and Iof my enduraunce, thou art a man, and I
PericlesPer V.iii.52Can you remember what I called the man?can you remember what I call'd the man,
PericlesPer V.iii.59Lord Cerimon, my lord; this manLord Cerimon, my Lord, this man
Richard IIR2 I.ii.24Made him a man; and though thou livest and breathestMade him a man: and though thou liu'st, and breath'st,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.13Against what man thou comest, and what thy quarrel.Against what man thou com'st, and what's thy quarrell,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.276Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.
Richard IIR2 I.iii.293The man that mocks at it and sets it light.
Richard IIR2 II.i.72What comfort, man? How is't with aged Gaunt?What comfort man? How ist with aged Gaunt?
Richard IIR2 II.i.233If it be so, out with it boldly, man!If it be so, out with it boldly man,
Richard IIR2 II.i.257The King's grown bankrupt like a broken man.The Kings growne bankrupt like a broken man.
Richard IIR2 II.iii.109Thou art a banished man, and here art comeThou art a banish'd man, and here art come
Richard IIR2 III.ii.58For every man that Bolingbroke hath pressedFor euery man that Bullingbrooke hath prest,
Richard IIR2 III.ii.130Dogs easily won to fawn on any man!Dogges, easily woon to fawne on any man,
Richard IIR2 III.ii.144No matter where. Of comfort no man speak.No matter where; of comfort no man speake:
Richard IIR2 III.ii.193Speak sweetly, man, although thy looks be sour.Speake sweetly man, although thy lookes be sowre.
Richard IIR2 III.ii.213For I have none. Let no man speak againFor I haue none. Let no man speake againe
Richard IIR2 III.iii.28Sir Stephen Scroop, besides a clergymanSir Stephen Scroope, besides a Clergie man
Richard IIR2 III.iii.135On yon proud man, should take it off againOn yond prowd man, should take it off againe
Richard IIR2 III.iii.185Makes him speak fondly, like a frantic man.Makes him speake fondly, like a frantick man:
Richard IIR2 III.iv.29.2 (to one man)
Richard IIR2 III.iv.76To make a second Fall of cursed man?To make a second fall of cursed man?
Richard IIR2 IV.i.7Cousin, stand forth, and look upon that man.Cosin, stand forth, and looke vpon that man.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.20What answer shall I make to this base man?What answer shall I make to this base man?
Richard IIR2 IV.i.172God save the King! Will no man say Amen?God saue the King: will no man say, Amen?
Richard IIR2 IV.i.253No lord of thine, thou haught, insulting man;No Lord of thine, thou haught-insulting man;
Richard IIR2 V.ii.28Did scowl on gentle Richard. No man cried ‘ God save him!’Did scowle on Richard: no man cride, God saue him:
Richard IIR2 V.ii.85.1His man enters with his bootsEnter Seruant with Boots.
Richard IIR2 V.ii.86(To York's man)
Richard IIR2 V.ii.88York's man gives him the boots and goes out
Richard IIR2 V.ii.109He is as like thee as a man may be;He is as like thee, as a man may bee,
Richard IIR2 V.iii.1Can no man tell me of my unthrifty son?Can no man tell of my vnthriftie Sonne?
Richard IIR2 V.iii.36That no man enter till my tale be done.That no man enter, till my tale be done.
Richard IIR2 V.iii.86O King, believe not this hard-hearted man.O King, beleeue not this hard-hearted man,
Richard IIR2 V.iv.1.1Enter Sir Piers of Exton and a ManEnter Exton and Seruants.
Richard IIR2 V.iv.8As who should say ‘ I would thou wert the manAs who should say, I would thou wer't the man
Richard IIR2 V.v.39Nor I, nor any man that but man is,Nor I, nor any man, that but man is,
Richard IIR2 V.v.70Where no man never comes but that sad dogWhere no man euer comes, but that sad dogge
Richard IIR2 V.v.89Of that proud man that did usurp his back?Of that proud man, that did vsurpe his backe?
Richard IIR2 V.v.91Since thou, created to be awed by man,Since thou created to be aw'd by man
Richard IIIR3 I.i.66Was it not she, and that good man of worship,Was it not shee, and that good man of Worship,
Richard IIIR3 I.i.71By heaven, I think there is no man secureBy heauen, I thinke there is no man secure
Richard IIIR3 I.i.86That no man shall have private conference,That no man shall haue priuate Conferenee.
Richard IIIR3 I.i.90We speak no treason, man; we say the KingWe speake no Treason man; We say the King
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.70Villain, thou know'st nor law of God nor man:Villaine, thou know'st nor law of God nor Man,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.78Vouchsafe, diffused infection of a man,Vouchsafe (defus'd infection of man)
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.195Then never man was true.Then neuer Man was true.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.254Myself to be a marvellous proper man.My selfe to be a maru'llous proper man.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.13A man that loves not me, nor none of you.A man that loues not me, nor none of you.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.51Cannot a plain man live and think no harm,Cannot a plaine man liue, and thinke no harme,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.185No man but prophesied revenge for it.No man but prophecied reuenge for it.
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.4That, as I am a Christian faithful man,That as I am a Christian faithfull man,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.137man a coward. A man cannot steal, but it accuseth him;man a Coward: A man cannot steale, but it accuseth him:
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.138a man cannot swear, but it checks him; a man cannot lieA man cannot Sweare, but it Checkes him: A man cannot lye
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.141bosom. It fills a man full of obstacles. It made me oncebosome: It filles a man full of Obstacles. It made me once
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.143any man that keeps it. It is turned out of all towns andany man that keepes it: It is turn'd out of Townes and
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.144cities for a dangerous thing, and every man that meansCitties for a dangerous thing, and euery man that means
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.154Spoke like a tall man that respectsSpoke like a tall man, that respects
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.167A man, as you are.A man, as you are.
Richard IIIR3 II.i.86Ay, my good lord; and no man in the presenceI my good Lord, and no man in the presence,
Richard IIIR3 II.i.89But he, poor man, by your first order died,But he (poore man) by your first order dyed,
Richard IIIR3 II.i.106My brother killed no man – his fault was thought – My Brother kill'd no man, his fault was Thought,
Richard IIIR3 II.i.121Sinfully plucked, and not a man of youSinfully pluckt, and not a man of you
Richard IIIR3 II.i.128But for my brother not a man would speak,But for my Brother, not a man would speake,
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.109Amen! (Aside) And make me die a good old man!Amen, and make me die a good old man,
Richard IIIR3 II.iii.39You cannot reason almost with a manYou cannot reason (almost) with a man,
Richard IIIR3 III.i.9Nor more can you distinguish of a manNo more can you distinguish of a man,
Richard IIIR3 III.i.84That Julius Caesar was a famous man.That Iulius Casar was a famous man,
Richard IIIR3 III.i.91An if I live until I be a man,And if I liue vntill I be a man,
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.72Come on, come on! Where is your boar-spear, man?Come on, come on, where is your Bore-speare man?
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.97I tell thee, man, 'tis better with me nowI tell thee man, 'tis better with me now,
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.115Good faith, and when I met this holy man,Good faith, and when I met this holy man,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.29Than my Lord Hastings no man might be bolder.Then my Lord Hastings, no man might be bolder,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.51I think there's never a man in ChristendomI thinke there's neuer a man in Christendome
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.56Marry, that with no man here he is offended;Mary, that with no man here he is offended:
Richard IIIR3 III.v.24So dear I loved the man that I must weep.So deare I lou'd the man, that I must weepe:
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.98True ornaments to know a holy man.True Ornaments to know a holy man.
Richard IIIR3 IV.ii.41I partly know the man. Go call him hither, boy.I partly know the man: goe call him hither, / Boy.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.271Send to her by the man that slew her brothersSend to her by the man that slew her Brothers,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.513.1No man knows whither.No man knowes whither.
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.308Go, gentleman, every man unto his charge.Go Gentlemen, euery man to his Charge,
Richard IIIR3 V.iv.2The King enacts more wonders than a man,The King enacts more wonders then a man,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.11will take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's.will take the wall of any Man or Maid of Mountagues.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.54a man as you.a man as you
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.202Bid a sick man in sadness make his will.A sicke man in sadnesse makes his will:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.206A right good markman! And she's fair I love.A right good marke man, and shee's faire I loue
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.45Tut, man, one fire burns out another's burning.Tut man, one fire burnes out anothers burning,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.54Not mad, but bound more than a madman is;Not mad, but bound more then a mad man is:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.41'A was a merry man – took up the child.a was a merrie man, tooke vp the Child,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.76A man, young lady! Lady, such a manA man young Lady, Lady, such a man
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.77As all the world – why, he's a man of wax.as all the world. Why hee's a man of waxe.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.100Enter ServingmanEnter a Seruing man.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.34But every man betake him to his legs.But euery man betake him to his legs.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.69Pricked from the lazy finger of a maid.prickt from the Lazie-finger of a man.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.35What, man? 'Tis not so much, 'tis not so much.What man: 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.81You will set cock-a-hoop! You'll be the man!You will set cocke a hoope, youle be the man.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.42Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!Belonging to a man. / O be some other name
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.52What man art thou that, thus bescreened in night,What man art thou, that thus bescreen'd in night
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.24In man as well as herbs – grace and rude will.In man as well as Hearbes, grace and rude will:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.49I bear no hatred, blessed man, for, lo,I beare no hatred, blessed man: for loe
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.3Not to his father's. I spoke with his man.Not to his Fathers, I spoke with his man.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.10Any man that can write may answer a letter.Any man that can write, may answere a Letter.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.16the blind bow-boy's butt-shaft. And is he a man tothe blind Bowe-boyes but-shaft, and is he a man to
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.30good blade! a very tall man! a very good whore!’ Why, isgood blade, a very tall man, a very good whore. Why is
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.50and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.and in such a case as mine, a man may straine curtesie.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.52constrains a man to bow in the hams.constrains a man to bow in the hams.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.99Enter Nurse and her man, PeterEnter Nurse and her man.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.111Out upon you! What a man are you!Out vpon you: what a man are you?
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.151skains-mates. (She turns to Peter her man) And thouskaines mates, and thou
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.154I saw no man use you at his pleasure. If I had, myI saw no man vse you at his pleasure: if I had, my
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.156I dare draw as soon as another man, if I see occasion inI dare draw assoone as another man, if I see occasion in
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.184Within this hour my man shall be with theeWithin this houre my man shall be with thee,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.192Is your man secret? Did you ne'er hear say,Is your man secret, did you nere heare say
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.194Warrant thee my man's as true as steel.Warrant thee my man as true as steele.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.197nobleman in town, one Paris, that would fain lay knifeNoble man in Towne one Paris, that would faine lay knife
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.200Paris is the properer man. But I'll warrant you, when IParis is the properer man, but Ile warrant you, when I
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.19Hast thou met with him? Send thy man away.Hast thou met with him? send thy man away.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.39not how to choose a man. Romeo? No, not he. Thoughnot how to chuse a man: Romeo, no not he though
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.17thou wilt quarrel with a man that hath a hair more or athou wilt quarrell with a man that hath a haire more, or a
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.19with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason butwith a man for cracking Nuts, hauing no other reason, but
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.24hast quarrelled with a man for coughing in the street,hast quarrel'd with a man for coffing in the street,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.31man should buy the fee-simple of my life for an hourman should buy the Fee-simple of my life, for an houre
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.55Well, peace be with you, sir. Here comes my man.Well peace be with you sir, here comes my man.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.58Your worship in that sense may call him ‘ man.’Your worship in that sense, may call him man.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.95Courage, man. The hurt cannot be much.Courage man, the hurt cannot be much.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.98tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered,to morrow, and you shall find me a graue man. I am pepper'd
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.101a man to death! A braggart, a rogue, a villain, that fightsa man to death: a Braggart, a Rogue, a Villaine, that fights
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.144There lies the man, slain by young Romeo,There lies the man slaine by young Romeo,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.88Ah, where's my man? Give me some aqua vitae.Ah where's my man? giue me some Aqua-vita?
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.1Romeo, come forth. Come forth, thou fearful man.Romeo come forth, / Come forth thou fearfull man,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.53Thou fond mad man, hear me a little speak.Then fond Mad man, heare me speake.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.89Stand up, stand up! Stand, an you be a man.Stand vp, stand vp, stand and you be a man,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.109Art thou a man? Thy form cries out thou art.Art thou a man? thy forme cries out thou art:
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.112Unseemly woman in a seeming man!Vnseemely woman, in a seeming man,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.127Digressing from the valour of a man;Digressing from the Valour of a man,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.135What, rouse thee, man! Thy Juliet is alive,What, rowse thee man, thy Iuliet is aliue,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.169Sojourn in Mantua. I'll find out your man,Soiourne in Mantua, Ile find out your man,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.83And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart.And yet no man like he, doth grieue my heart.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.96Madam, if you could find out but a manMadam if you could find out but a man
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.103Find thou the means, and I'll find such a man.Find thou the meanes, and Ile find such a man.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.183Proportioned as one's thought would wish a manProportion'd as ones thought would wish a man,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.85And hide me with a dead man in his tomb –And hide me with a dead man in his graue,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.iii.29For he hath still been tried a holy man.For he hath still beene tried a holy man.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.7Strange dream that gives a dead man leave to think! –(Strange dreame that giues a dead man leaue to thinke,)
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.12Enter Balthasar, Romeo's man, bootedEnter Romeo's man.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.33Exit BalthasarExit Man.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.50An if a man did need a poison nowAn if a man did need a poyson now,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.54And this same needy man must sell it me.And this same needie man must sell it me.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.58Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor.Come hither man, I see that thou art poore,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.59Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man.Good gentle youth, tempt not a desperate man,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.76What said my man when my betossed soulWhat said my man, when my betossed soule
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.87Death, lie thou there, by a dead man interred.Death lie thou there, by a dead man inter'd.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.182Enter some of the Watch, with BalthasarEnter Romeo's man.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.182Here's Romeo's man. We found him in the churchyard.Here's Romeo'r man, / We found him in the Churchyard.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.199Here is a Friar, and slaughtered Romeo's man,Here is a Frier, and Slaughter'd Romeos man,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.270We still have known thee for a holy man.We still haue knowne thee for a Holy man.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.271Where's Romeo's man? What can he say to this?Where's Romeo's man? What can he say to this?
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.34Sirs, I will practise on this drunken man.Sirs, I will practise on this drunken man.
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.13O, that a mighty man of such descent,Oh that a mightie man of such discent,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.95Which never were nor no man ever saw.Which neuer were, nor no man euer saw.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.1.1Enter Lucentio and his man TranioEnter Lucentio, and his man Triano.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.110can by any means light on a fit man to teach her thatcan by any meanes light on a fit man to teach her that
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.123her father be very rich, any man is so very a fool to beher father be verie rich, any man is so verie a foole to be
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.126and mine to endure her loud alarums, why, man, there be& mine to endure her lowd alarums, why man there bee
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.127good fellows in the world, an a man could light on them,good fellowes in the world, and a man could light on them,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.137afresh. Sweet Bianca! Happy man be his dole. He thatafresh: Sweet Bianca, happy man be his dole: hee that
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.198For man or master. Then it follows thus – For man or master: then it followes thus;
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.202Some Neapolitan, or meaner man of Pisa.Some Neapolitan, or meaner man of Pisa.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.229I killed a man, and fear I was descried.I kil'd a man, and feare I was descried:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.1Enter Petruchio and his man GrumioEnter Petruchio, and his man Grumio.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.7man has rebused your worship?man ha's rebus'd your worship?
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.166On this young man, for learning and behaviourOn this yong man: For learning and behauiour
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.259And will not promise her to any manAnd will not promise her to any man,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.262If it be so, sir, that you are the manIf it be so sir, that you are the man
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.39.2the habit of a mean man; Petruchio, with Hortensio,the habit of a meane man, Petruchio with
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.55I do present you with a man of mine,I do present you with a man of mine
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.69A man well known throughout all Italy.A man well knowne throughout all Italy.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.104A mighty man of Pisa. By reportA mightie man of Pisa by report,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.268Thou must be married to no man but me.Thou must be married to no man but me,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.i.11Was it not to refresh the mind of manWas it not to refresh the minde of man
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.i.35 man Tranio – ‘ regia,’ bearing my port – ‘ celsa senis,’man Tranio, regia, bearing my port, celsa senis
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.i.39Spit in the hole, man, and tune again.Spit in the hole man, and tune againe.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.14And to be noted for a merry man,And to be noted for a merry man;
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.81A horse and a mana horse and a man
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.130I am to get a man – whate'er he beI am to get a man what ere he be,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.236Rescue thy mistress if thou be a man.Rescue thy Mistresse if thou be a man:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.2all foul ways! Was ever man so beaten? Was ever man soall foule waies: was euer man so beaten? was euer man so
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.3rayed? Was ever man so weary? I am sent before to makeraide? was euer man so weary? I am sent before to make
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.9the weather, a taller man than I will take cold.the weather, a taller man then I will take cold:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.20know'st winter tames man, woman, and beast; for itknow'st winter tames man, woman, and beast: for it
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.106Where be these knaves? What, no man at doorWhere be these knaues? What no man at doore
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.179Another way I have to man my haggard,Another way I haue to man my Haggard,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.35A' will make the man mad, to makeA will make the man mad to make
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.40Happier the man whom favourable starsHappier the man whom fauourable stars
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.43This is a man, old, wrinkled, faded, withered,This is a man old, wrinckled, faded, withered,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.18What if a man bring him a hundred pound orWhat if a man bring him a hundred pound or
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.51Help, help, help! Here's a madman willHelpe, helpe, helpe, here's a mad man
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.63What, is the man lunatic?What is the man lunaticke?
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.65habit, but your words show you a madman. Why, sir,habit: but your words shew you a mad man: why sir,
The TempestTem I.ii.109Absolute Milan. Me, poor man, my libraryAbsolute Millaine, Me (poore man) my Librarie
The TempestTem I.ii.169.1But ever see that man!But euer see that man.
The TempestTem I.ii.214Was the first man that leaped; cried, ‘ Hell is empty,Was the first man that leapt; cride hell is empty,
The TempestTem I.ii.446Is the third man that e'er I saw; the firstIs the third man that ere I saw: the first
The TempestTem I.ii.457.2No, as I am a man!No, as I am a man.
The TempestTem I.ii.484.1To see a goodlier man.To see a goodlier man.
The TempestTem II.i.170None, man, all idle – whoresNone (man) all idle; Whores
The TempestTem II.i.253The Man i'th' Moon's too slow – till new-born chinsThe Man i'th Moone's too slow, till new-borne chinnes
The TempestTem II.ii.24by pailfuls. What have we here? A man or a fish? Deadby paile-fuls. What haue we here, a man, or a fish? dead
The TempestTem II.ii.30make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man.make a man: any strange beast there, makes a man:
The TempestTem II.ii.33man! And his fins like arms! Warm, o' my troth! I doman; and his Finnes like Armes: warme o'my troth: I doe
The TempestTem II.ii.39Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows. IMisery acquaints a man with strange bedfellowes: I
The TempestTem II.ii.59four legs. For it hath been said, ‘ As proper a man asfoure legges: for it hath bin said; as proper a man as
The TempestTem II.ii.125Swum ashore, man, like a duck. I can swimSwom ashore (man) like a Ducke: I can swim
The TempestTem II.ii.131The whole butt, man. My cellar is in a rockThe whole But (man) my Cellar is in a rocke
The TempestTem II.ii.136Man i'th' Moon when time was.Man ith' Moone, when time was.
The TempestTem II.ii.143Man i'th' Moon? A most poor credulous monster! – Man ith' Moone? A most poore creadulous Monster:
The TempestTem II.ii.161Thou wondrous man.thou wondrous man.
The TempestTem II.ii.181Has a new master – get a new man!Has a new Master, get a new Man.
The TempestTem III.ii.26thou, was there ever man a coward that hath drunk sothou, was there euer man a Coward, that hath drunk so
The TempestTem III.ii.107Monster, I will kill this man. His daughterMonster, I will kill this man: his daughter
The TempestTem III.ii.129If thou beest a man, show thyself in thy likeness.If thou beest a man, shew thy selfe in thy likenes:
The TempestTem III.iii.58Where man doth not inhabit, you 'mongst menWhere man doth not inhabit, you 'mongst men,
The TempestTem IV.i.95Some wanton charm upon this man and maid,Some wanton charme, vpon this Man and Maide,
The TempestTem V.i.62Holy Gonzalo, honourable man,Holy Gonzallo, Honourable man,
The TempestTem V.i.213.1When no man was his own.When no man was his owne.
The TempestTem V.i.256Every man shift for all the rest, and let noEuery man shift for all the rest, and let / No
The TempestTem V.i.257man take care for himself, for all is but fortune. Coragio,man take care for himselfe; for all is / But fortune: Coragio
Timon of AthensTim I.i.10A most incomparable man, breathed, as it were,A most incomparable man, breath'd as it were,
Timon of AthensTim I.i.41The senators of Athens – happy man!The Senators of Athens, happy men.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.44I have in this rough work shaped out a manI haue in this rough worke, shap'd out a man
Timon of AthensTim I.i.77With one man beckoned from the rest below,With one man becken'd from the rest below,
Timon of AthensTim I.i.117Most noble Timon, call the man before thee.Most Noble Timon, call the man before thee.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.121By night frequents my house. I am a manBy night frequents my house. I am a man
Timon of AthensTim I.i.129In qualities of the best. This man of thineIn Qualities of the best. This man of thine
Timon of AthensTim I.i.132.2The man is honest.The man is honest.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.161The painting is almost the natural man;The Painting is almost the Naturall man:
Timon of AthensTim I.i.215cost a man a doit.cast a man a Doit.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.286That ever governed man.That euer gouern'd man.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.26Does not become a man; 'tis much too blame.Does not become a man, 'tis much too blame:
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.28But yond man is ever angry.But yond man is verie angrie.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.47him in a divided draught, is the readiest man to killhim in a diuided draught: is the readiest man to kill
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.48him. 'T has been proved. If I were a huge man, I shouldhim. 'Tas beene proued, if I were a huge man I should
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.58Honest water, which ne'er left man i'th' mire.Honest water, which nere left man i'th'mire:
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.62I pray for no man but myself.I pray for no man but my selfe,
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.64To trust man on his oath or bond,To trust man on his Oath or Bond.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.161That man might ne'er be wretched for his mind.That man might ne're be wretched for his minde.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.215You may take my word, my lord. I know no manYou may take my word my Lord: I know no man
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.115knight. And, generally, in all shapes that man goes upKnight; and generally, in all shapes that man goes vp
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.119Nor thou altogether a wise man. As much fooleryNor thou altogether a Wise man, / As much foolerie
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.219Prithee, man, look cheerly. These old fellowsPrythee man looke cheerely. These old Fellowes
Timon of AthensTim III.i.28coming. Every man has his fault, and honesty is his. Icomming, euery man has his fault, and honesty is his. I
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.18gods, I am ashamed on't. Denied that honourable man?Gods I am asham'd on't. Denied that honourable man?
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.74And yet – O see the monstrousness of manAnd yet, oh see the monstrousnesse of man,
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.17For, in my conscience, I was the first manFor in my conscience, I was the first man
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.29devil knew not what he did when he made man politicdiuell knew not what he did, when hee made man Politicke;
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.31end the villainies of man will set him clear. How fairlyend, the Villanies of man will set him cleere. How fairely
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.1.1Enter two Servants of Varro, and the Servant ofEnter Varro's man, meeting others.
Timon of AthensTim III.v.14He is a man, setting his fate aside,He is a Man (setting his Fate aside)
Timon of AthensTim III.v.32The worst that man can breathe,The worst that man can breath,
Timon of AthensTim III.v.58But who is man that is not angry?But who is Man, that is not Angrie.
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.19Every man here's so. What would he haveEuery man heares so: what would hee haue
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.62This is the old man still.This is the old man still.
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.66Each man to his stool, with that spur as he wouldEach man to his stoole, with that spurre as hee would
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.74each man enough, that one need not lend to another; foreach man enough, that one neede not lend to another. For
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.76the gods. Make the meat be beloved more than the man thatthe Gods. Make the Meate be beloued, more then the Man that
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.98Of man and beast the infinite maladyOf Man and Beast, the infinite Maladie
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.105Of Timon man and all humanity.Of Timon Man, and all Humanity.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.51For showing me again the eyes of man!For shewing me againe the eyes of Man.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.52What is thy name? Is man so hateful to theeWhat is thy name? Is man so hatefull to thee,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.53That art thyself a man?That art thy selfe a Man?
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.75Thou art a man. If thou dost not perform,thou / art a man: if thou do'st performe,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.76Confound thee, for thou art a man.confound thee, for / thou art a man.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.153In hollow bones of man; strike their sharp shins,In hollow bones of man, strike their sharpe shinnes,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.181Whereof thy proud child, arrogant man, is puffed,Whereof thy proud Childe (arrogant man) is puft,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.189Let it no more bring out ingrateful man.Let it no more bring out ingratefull man.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.195Whereof ingrateful man with liquorish draughtsWhereof ingratefull man with Licourish draughts
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.198More man? Plague, plague!More man? Plague, plague.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.312shouldst have loved thyself better now. What man didstshould'st haue loued thy selfe better now. What man didd'st
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.392Think thy slave man rebels, and by thy virtueThinke thy slaue-man rebels, and by thy vertue
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.459no time so miserable but a man may be true.no time so miserable, but a man may be true.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.461Is yond despised and ruinous man my lord?Is yon'd despis'd and ruinous man my Lord?
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.469When man was wished to love his enemies!When man was wisht to loue his Enemies:
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.477Then, if thou grantest th' art a man, I have forgot thee.Then, if thou grunt'st, th'art a man. / I haue forgot thee.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.480I never had honest man about me, I.I neuer had honest man about me, I
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.496Let me behold thy face. Surely this manLet me behold thy face: Surely, this man
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.500One honest man. Mistake me not, but one – One honest man: Mistake me not, but one:
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.526Look thee, 'tis so. Thou singly honest man,Looke thee, 'tis so: thou singly honest man,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.540Ne'er see thou man, and let me ne'er see thee.Ne're see thou man, and let me ne're see thee.
Timon of AthensTim V.i.30a man so bad as is thyself.a man so badde / As is thy selfe.
Timon of AthensTim V.i.69.2Ay, you are honest men.I, you are honest man.
Timon of AthensTim V.i.105Each man apart, all single and alone,Each man a part, all single, and alone,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.116That nothing but himself which looks like manThat nothing but himselfe, which lookes like man,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.123The former man may make him. Bring us to him,The former man may make him: bring vs to him
Timon of AthensTim V.ii.9And made us speak like friends. This man was ridingAnd made vs speake like Friends. This man was riding
Timon of AthensTim V.iii.4Some beast read this; there does not live a man.Some Beast reade this; There do's not liue a Man.
Timon of AthensTim V.iv.59With my more noble meaning, not a manWith my more Noble meaning, not a man
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.25A nobler man, a braver warrior,A Nobler man, a brauer Warriour,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.392No man shed tears for noble Mutius;No man shed teares for Noble Mutius,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.399Is she not then beholden to the manIs she not then beholding to the man,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.460Take up this good old man, and cheer the heartTake vp this good old man, and cheere the heart,
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.85What, man, more water glideth by the millWhat man, more water glideth by the Mill
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.28The tribunes hear you not, no man is by,The Tribunes heare not, no man is by,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.33Why, 'tis no matter, man. If they did hear,Why 'tis no matter man, if they did heare
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.52O happy man, they have befriended thee!O happy man, they haue befriended thee:
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.99Here stands my other son, a banished man,Heere stands my other sonne, a banisht man,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.141For thou, poor man, hast drowned it with thine own.For thou poore man hast drown'd it with thine owne.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.288The woefull'st man that ever lived in Rome.The woful'st man that euer liu'd in Rome:
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.24Why, Marcus, no man should be mad but I.Why Marcus, no man should be mad but I:
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.79Alas, poor man, grief has so wrought on himAlas poore man, griefe ha's so wrought on him,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.106I say, my lord, that if I were a manI say my Lord, that if I were a man,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.123O heavens, can you hear a good man groanO heauens! Can you heare a good man grone
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.26Here's no sound jest. The old man hath found their guilt,Heer's no sound iest, the old man hath found their guilt,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.82What, must it, nurse? Then let no man but IWhat, must it Nurse? Then let no man but I
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.22And leave you not a man-of-war unsearched.And leaue you not a man of warre vnsearcht,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.81them down again, for the man must not be hanged tillthem downe againe, for the man must not be hang'd till
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iv.75When I have walked like a private man,(When I haue walked like a priuate man)
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.39To use as you think needful of the man.To vse, as you thinke neeedefull of the man.
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.128As kill a man or else devise his death,As kill a man, or else deuise his death,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.28Know, thou sad man, I am not Tamora.Know thou sad man, I am not Tamora,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.99And when thou find'st a man that's like thyself,And when thou find'st a man that's like thyselfe,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.149Tell us, old man, how shall we be employed?Tell vs old man, how shall we be imploy'd?
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.126Or more than any living man could bear.Or more then any liuing man could beare.
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.136Come, come, thou reverend man of Rome,Come come, thou reuerent man of Rome,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.195No funeral rite, nor man in mourning weed,No Funerall Rite, nor man in mournfull Weeds:
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.1Enter Cressida and her man AlexanderEnter Cressid and her man.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.15They say he is a very man per se,They say he is a very man per se
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.19This man, lady, hath robbed many beastsThis man Lady, hath rob'd many beasts
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.21churlish as the bear, slow as the elephant; a man intochurlish as the Beare, slow as the Elephant: a man into
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.24There is no man hath a virtue that he hath not athere is no man hath a vertue, that he hath not a
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.25glimpse of, nor any man an attaint but he carries someglimpse of, nor any man an attaint, but he carries some
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.31But how should this man, that makes meBut how should this man that makes me
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.39Hector's a gallant man.Hectors a gallant man.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.60Who, Troilus? Troilus is the better man ofWho Troylus? / Troylus is the better man of
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.64you know a man if you see him?you know a man if you see him?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.80were in her body. No, Hector is not a better man thanwere in her body; no, Hector is not a better man then
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.118Is he so young a man, and so old a lifter?Is he is so young a man, and so old a lifter?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.123smiling becomes him better than any man in allsmyling becomes him better then any man in all
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.175'twere a man born in April.'twere a man borne in Aprill. Sound a retreate.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.186That's Aeneas; is not that a brave man? He'sThat's Aneas, is not that a braue man, hee's
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.191tell you, and he's a man good enough; he's onetell you, and hee's a man good inough, hee's one
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.193proper man of person. When comes Troilus? I'll showproper man of person: when comes Troylus? Ile shew
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.201brave man, niece. – O brave Hector! Look how hebraue man Neece, O braue Hector! Looke how hee
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.202looks! There's a countenance! Is't not a brave man?lookes? there's a countenance; ist not a braue man?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.203O, a brave man!O braue man!
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.213Look ye yonder, niece, is't not a gallant man too, is'tlooke yee yonder Neece, ist not a gallant man to, ist
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.228Troilus! There's a man, niece, hem! – Brave Troilus,Troylus! Ther's a man Neece, hem? Braue Troylus
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.238admirable man! Paris? – Paris is dirt to him, and Iadmirable man! Paris? Paris is durt to him, and I
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.245be such a man as Troilus than Agamemnon and allbe such a man as Troylus, then Agamemnon, and all
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.248man than Troilus.man then Troylus.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.252Have you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is nothaue you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.255the spice and salt that season a man?the Spice, and salt that seasons a man?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.256Ay, a minced man; and then to be baked withI, a minc'd man, and then to be bak'd with
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.291Tell him of Nestor, one that was a manTell him of Nestor, one that was a man
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.294One noble man that hath one spark of fireOne Noble man, that hath one spark of fire
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.350As 'twere from forth us all, a man distilledAs 'twere, from forth vs all: a man distill'd
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.374In taint of our best man. No, make a lottery,In taint of our best man. No, make a Lott'ry,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.377Give him allowance as the worthier man;Giue him allowance as the worthier man,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.55How now, Thersites, what's the matter, man?How now Thersites? what's the matter man?
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.96voluntary; no man is beaten voluntary. Ajax was herevoluntary, no man is beaten voluntary: Aiax was heere
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.128He knew his man.He knew his man.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.8Though no man lesser fears the Greeks than IThough no man lesser feares the Greeks then I,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.56He is a privileged man. – Proceed, Thersites.He is a priuiledg'd man, proceede Thersites.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.87melancholy, if you will favour the man, but, by myMelancholly if will fauour the man, but by my
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.144better man than I am?a better man then I am?
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.150Why should a man be proud? How doth prideWhy should a man be proud? How doth pride
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.157I do hate a proud man as I hate the engendering ofI do hate a proud man, as I hate the ingendring of
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.226Here is a man – but 'tis before his face;Here is a man, but 'tis before his face,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.1Enter Pandarus and Troilus's Man, meetingEnter Pandarus and Troylus Man.
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.5Exit Man
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.125And yet, good faith, I wished myself a man,And yet good faith I wisht my selfe a man;
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.80And not a man, for being simply man,And not a man for being simply man,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.96Writes me that man – how dearly ever parted,Writes me, that man, how dearely euer parted,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.115That no man is the lord of any thing,That no may is the Lord of any thing,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.125The unknown Ajax. Heavens, what a man is there!The vnknowne Aiax; / Heauens what a man is there?
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.136How one man eats into another's pride,How one man eates into anothers pride,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.181Then marvel not, thou great and complete man,Then maruell not thou great and compleat man,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.218Is not more loathed than an effeminate manIs not more loth'd, then an effeminate man,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.262this man, that takes me for the general? He's grown athis man, that takes me for the Generall? Hee's growne a
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.264opinion! A man may wear it on both sides, like a leatheropinion, a man may weare it on both sides like a leather
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.24No man alive can love in such a sortNo man aliue can loue in such a sort,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.33man – let it sleep? – A bugbear take him!man) let it sleepe: a bug-beare take him.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.41You are an odd man; give even, or give none.You are an odde man, giue euen, or giue none.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.42An odd man, lady? Every man is odd.An odde man Lady, euery man is odde.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.139Thou art too gentle and too free a man.Thou art too gentle, and too free a man:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.199Never like thee. Let an old man embrace thee;Neuer like thee. Let an oldman embrace thee,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.247It would discredit the blest gods, proud man,It would discredit the blest Gods, proud man,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.10She will sing any man at first sight.She will sing any man at first sight.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.11And any man may sing her, if he can take herAnd any man may finde her, if he can take her
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.168Inflamed with Venus; never did young man fancyInflam'd with Uenus: neuer did yong man fancy
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.27Lie every man holds dear, but the dear manLife euery man holds deere, but the deere man
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.29How now, young man, mean'st thou to fight today?How now yong man? mean'st thou to fight to day?
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.38Which better fits a lion than a man.Which better fits a Lyon, then a man.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.105such an ache in my bones that unless a man were curstsuch an ache in my bones; that vnlesse a man were curst,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.vi.20I would have been much more a fresher man,I would haue beene much more a fresher man,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.viii.10Strike, fellows, strike; this is the man I seek.Strike fellowes, strike, this is the man I seeke.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ix.6Great Hector was a man as good as he.Great Hector was a man as good as he.
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.18He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.81more wit than a Christian or an ordinary man has; but Imore wit then a Christian, or an ordinary man ha's: but I
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.105her swear't. Tut, there's life in't, man.her swear't. Tut there's life in't man.
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.110As any man in Illyria, whatsoever he be,As any man in Illyria, whatsoeuer he be,
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.112with an old man.with an old man.
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.117strong as any man in Illyria.strong as any man in Illyria.
Twelfth NightTN I.iv.31That say thou art a man. Diana's lipThat say thou art a man: Dianas lip
Twelfth NightTN I.v.32man. For what says Quinapalus? ‘ Better a witty fool man. For what saies Quinapalus, Better a witty foole,
Twelfth NightTN I.v.40not dry. Bid the dishonest man mend himself: if henot dry: bid the dishonest man mend himself, if he
Twelfth NightTN I.v.90railing in a known discreet man, though he do nothingrayling, in a knowne discreet man, though hee do nothing
Twelfth NightTN I.v.997I know not, madam. 'Tis a fair young man, andI know not (Madam) 'tis a faire young man, and
Twelfth NightTN I.v.125What's a drunken man like, fool?What's a drunken man like, foole?
Twelfth NightTN I.v.126Like a drowned man, a fool, and a madman. OneLike a drown'd man, a foole, and a madde man: One
Twelfth NightTN I.v.145What kind o' man is he?What kinde o'man is he?
Twelfth NightTN I.v.147What manner of man?What manner of man?
Twelfth NightTN I.v.151Not yet old enough for a man, nor youngNot yet old enough for a man, nor yong
Twelfth NightTN I.v.154standing water between boy and man. He is very well-favoured,standing water, betweene boy and man. He is verie well-fauour'd,
Twelfth NightTN I.v.283Unless the master were the man. How now?Vnlesse the Master were the man. How now?
Twelfth NightTN I.v.291The County's man. He left this ring behind him,The Countes man: he left this Ring behinde him
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.25I am the man! If it be so – as 'tis – I am the man, if it be so, as tis,
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.36What will become of this? As I am man,What will become of this? As I am man,
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.78There dwelt a man in Babylon, lady, lady – There dwelt a man in Babylon, Lady, Lady.
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.106My father had a daughter loved a manMy Father had a daughter lou'd a man
Twelfth NightTN II.v.7I would exult, man. You know he brought meI would exult man: you know he brought me
Twelfth NightTN II.v.98No man must know.no man must know.
Twelfth NightTN II.v.99‘ No man must know ’! What follows? The numbersNo man must know. What followes? The numbers
Twelfth NightTN II.v.100altered! ‘ No man must know ’! If this should be thee,alter'd: No man must know, If this should be thee
Twelfth NightTN II.v.157will be point-device the very man. I do not now foolwill be point deuise, the very man. I do not now foole
Twelfth NightTN III.i.17Why, man?Why man?
Twelfth NightTN III.i.21Thy reason, man?Thy reason man?
Twelfth NightTN III.i.130Your wife is like to reap a proper man.your wife is like to reape a proper man:
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.13come, for sure the man is tainted in's wits.come, for sure the man is tainted in's wits.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.23Why, how dost thou, man? What is the matterWhy how doest thou man? / What is the matter
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.66man than Sir Toby to look to me! This concurs directlyman then sir Toby to looke to me. This concurres directly
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.88How is't with you, man?How ist with you man?
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.97is't with you? What, man, defy the devil! Consider,ist with you? What man, defie the diuell: consider,
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.115Ay, biddy, come with me. What, man, 'tis notI biddy, come with me. What man, tis not
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.129device, man.deuice man.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.222You mistake, sir. I am sure no man hath anyYou mistake sir I am sure, no man hath any
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.224from any image of offence done to any man.from any image of offence done to any man.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.228strength, skill, and wrath can furnish man withal.strength, skill, and wrath, can furnish man withall.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.239to taste their valour. Belike this is a man of that quirk.to taste their valour: belike this is a man of that quirke.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.257I beseech you, what manner of man is he?I beseech you what manner of man is he?
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.267Why, man, he's a very devil. I have not seenWhy man hee s a verie diuell, I haue not seen
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.294make me tell them how much I lack of a man.make me tell them how much I lacke of a man.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.317This is the man; do thy office.This is the man, do thy Office.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.341Lest that it make me so unsound a manLeast that it make me so vnsound a man
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.345I hate ingratitude more in a manI hate ingratitude more in a man,
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.362The man grows mad; away with him. Come, come, sir.The man growes mad, away with him: Come, come sir.
Twelfth NightTN IV.i.12great man, and now applies it to a fool. Vent my folly!great man, and now applyes it to a foole. Vent my folly:
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.8to be said an honest man and a good housekeeper goes asto be said an honest man and a good hous-keeper goes as
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.9fairly as to say a careful man and a great scholar. Thefairely, as to say, a carefull man, & a great scholler. The
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.25Out, hyperbolical fiend, how vexest thou this man!Out hyperbolicall fiend, how vexest thou this man?
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.28Sir Topas, never was man thus wronged.Sir Topas, neuer was man thus wronged,
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.47was never man thus abused. I am no more mad than youwas neuer man thus abus'd, I am no more madde then you
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.87Fool, there was never man so notoriouslyFoole, there was neuer man so notoriouslie
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.107paper. I tell thee, I am as well in my wits as any man inpaper, I tell thee I am as well in my wittes, as any man in
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.129Adieu, goodman devil!’Adieu good man diuell.
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.23Now go with me and with this holy manNow go with me, and with this holy man
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.32I'll follow this good man, and go with you;Ile follow this good man, and go with you,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.47Here comes the man, sir, that did rescue me.Here comes the man sir, that did rescue mee.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.260You are betrothed both to a maid and man.You are betroth'd both to a maid and man.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.282end as well as a man in his case may do. He's here writ aend as well as a man in his case may do: has heere writ a
Twelfth NightTN V.i.383For so you shall be, while you are a man.(For so you shall be while you are a man:)
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.iii.20And how he cannot be a perfect man,And how he cannot be a perfect man,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.57man counts of her beauty.man counts of her beauty.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.33matter? Why weepest thou, man? Away, ass, you'll losematter? why weep'st thou man? away asse, you'l loose
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.36unkindest tied that ever any man tied.vnkindest Tide, that euer any man tide.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.39Tut, man, I mean thou'lt lose the flood; and,Tut, man: I meane thou'lt loose the flood, and
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.49and the service, and the tied. Why, man, if the riverand the Seruice, and the tide: why man, if the Riuer
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.52Come, come away, man. I was sent to callCome: come away man, I was sent to call
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.166Not for the world! Why, man, she is mine own;Not for the world: why man, she is mine owne,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.3welcome. I reckon this always, that a man is never undonewelcome. I reckon this alwaies, that a man is neuer vndon
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.29And so, unworthily, disgrace the manAnd so (vnworthily) disgrace the man
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.104That man that hath a tongue, I say, is no man,That man that hath a tongue, I say is no man,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.109That no man hath access by day to her.That no man hath accesse by day to her.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.112That no man hath recourse to her by night.That no man hath recourse to her by night.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.282Why, man? How black?Why man? how blacke?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.301What need a man care for a stock with a wench,What neede a man care for a stock with a wench,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.364a better man than thee.a better man then thee.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.10Ay, by my beard, will we; for he's a proper man.I by my beard will we: for he is a proper man.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.12A man I am crossed with adversity;A man I am, cross'd with aduersitie:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.26I killed a man, whose death I much repent;I kil'd a man, whose death I much repent,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.57A linguist, and a man of such perfectionA Linguist, and a man of such perfection,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.59Indeed, because you are a banished man,Indeede because you are a banish'd man,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.54How do you, man? The music likes you not.How doe you, man? the Musicke likes you not.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.72I tell you what Launce, his man, told me: he lovedI tell you what Launce his man told me, / He lou'd
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.92Thou subtle, perjured, false, disloyal man,Thou subtile, periur'd, false, disloyall man:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.1How use doth breed a habit in a man!How vse doth breed a habit in a man?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.63For such is a friend now; treacherous man,For such is a friend now: treacherous man,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.111Than men their minds? 'Tis true. O heaven, were manThen men their minds? tis true: oh heuen, were man
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.124Your grace is welcome to a man disgraced,Your Grace is welcome to a man disgrac'd,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.95A jot of terror to us. Yet what manA jot of terrour to us; Yet what man
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.85.1Love any that's called man.Love any that's calld Man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iv.39What man to man may do – for our sake, more,What man to man may doe for our sake more,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.122A willing man dies sleeping and all's done.A willing man dies sleeping, and all's done.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.187.1Why, what's the matter, man?Why whats the matter Man?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.210Might not a man well lose himself and love her?Might not a man well lose himselfe and love her?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.255Be as that cursed man that hates his country,Be as that cursed man that hates his Country,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.303.2He's a blessed man!Hees a blessed man,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.55We'll see the sports, then every man to's tackle;Weele see the sports, then every man to's Tackle:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iii.8I, seeing, thought he was a goodly man;I (seeing) thought he was a goodly man;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iii.14To a young handsome man. Then I loved him,To a yong hansom Man; Then I lov'd him,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iv.2Since Hercules, a man of tougher sinews.Since Hercules, a man of tougher synewes;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iv.16.1Upon my soul, a proper man.Vpon my soule, a proper man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iv.18I have not seen so young a man so noble – I have not seene so yong a man, so noble
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.v.24Could I persuade him to become a free man,Could I perswade him to become a Freeman,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.v.31And to his face, no man. I'll presentlyAnd to his face, no-man: Ile presently
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.v.37Kissing the man they look for. Farewell, father;Kissing the man they looke for: farewell Father;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.12That I, poor man, might eftsoons come betweenThat I poore man might eftsoones come betweene
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.ii.16A sense to know a man unarmed, and canA sence to know a man unarmd, and can
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.17Drink a good hearty draught, it breeds good blood, man.Drinke a good hearty draught, it breeds good blood man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.31.1She loved a black-haired man.She lov'd a black-haird man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.10And ‘ Then let be,’ and no man understand me?and then let be, and no man understand mee,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.4He's neither man nor soldier. When he left me,He's neither man, nor Souldier; when he left me
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.28We were not bred to talk, man; when we are armed,We were not bred to talke man, when we are arm'd
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.44That no man but thy cousin's fit to kill thee.That no man but thy Cosen's fit to kill thee,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.50Then as I am an honest man and love,Then as I am an honest man and love,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.142A falser ne'er seemed friend; this is the manA Falser neu'r seem'd friend: This is the man
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.157.1What more than man is this!What more then man is this!
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.160And no more moved. Where this man calls me traitor,And no more mov'd: where this man calls me Traitor,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.17Be of good comfort, man; I bring you news,Be of good comfort man; I bring you newes,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.24.2Ye are a good manYe are a good man
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.82And ‘ Palamon was a tall young man.’ The placeAnd Palamon, was a tall yong man. The place
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.120.2Yes, he's a fine man.Yes, he's a fine man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.139.2Heaven forbid, man!Heaven forbid man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.140.1Come hither; you are a wise man.Come hither, you are a wise man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.12She would run mad for this man. What an eye,She would run mad for this man: what an eye?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.77Should be a stout man; by his face, a prince.Should be a stout man, by his face a Prince,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.114Are as a man would wish 'em, strong and clean;Are as a man would wish 'em, strong, and cleane,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.117A little man, but of a tough soul, seemingA little man, but of a tough soule, seeming
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.12‘ down-a, down-a,’ and penned by no worse man thandowne / A downe a, and pend by no worse man, then
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.61Understand you she ever affected any man ereVnderstand you, she ever affected any man, ere
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.107And women 'twere they wronged. I knew a manAnd women t'wer they wrong'd. I knew a man
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.86Worth so composed a man; their single share,Worth so composd a Man: their single share,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.1There's many a man alive that hath outlivedTher's many a man alive, that hath out liv'd
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.97Thou art a right good man, and while I liveThou art a right good man, and while I live,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK epilogue.4And let me look upon ye. No man smile?And let me looke upon ye: No man smile?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK prologue.17How will it shake the bones of that good man,How will it shake the bones of that good man,
The Winter's TaleWT I.i.39he was born desire yet their life to see him a man.he was borne, desire yet their life, to see him a Man.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.163You will? Why, happy man be's dole! My brother,You will: why happy man be's dole. My Brother
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.192And many a man there is, even at this present,And many a man there is (euen at this present,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.211Go play, Mamillius. Thou'rt an honest man.Goe play (Mamillius) thou'rt an honest man:
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.251In every one of these no man is free,In euery one of these, no man is free,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.272Resides not in that man that does not think – Resides not in that man, that do's not thinke)
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.333.1Could man so blench?Could man so blench?
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.400I conjure thee, by all the parts of manI coniure thee, by all the parts of man,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.455He is dishonoured by a man which everHe is dishonor'd by a man, which euer
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.29.1There was a manThere was a man.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.61.1A man, the worst about you.A man, the worst about you.
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.73Is that Camillo was an honest man;Is, that Camillo was an honest man;
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.155Whom I proclaim a man of truth, of mercy:(Whom I proclaime a man of Truth, of Mercy:)
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.80What ail'st thou, man?what ayl'st thou, man?
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.104man!man.
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.116You're a made old man. If theYou're a mad olde man: If the
The Winter's TaleWT IV.ii.38most homely shepherd – a man, they say, that from verymost homely shepheard: a man (they say) that from very
The Winter's TaleWT IV.ii.41I have heard, sir, of such a man, who hath aI haue heard (sir) of such a man, who hath a
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.58Alas, poor man! A million of beating may comeAlas poore man, a million of beating may come
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.91Vices I would say, sir. I know this man well.Vices I would say (Sir.) I know this man well,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.193He hath songs for man or woman, of all sizes:He hath songs for man, or woman, of all sizes:
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.200maid to answer, ‘ Whoop, do me no harm, good man ’;maid to answere, Whoop, doe me no harme good man:
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.202good man.’good man.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.254Fear not thou, man; thou shalt lose nothing here.Feare not thou man, thou shalt lose nothing here
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.287to the tune of ‘ Two maids wooing a man.’ There'sto the tune of two maids wooing a man: there's
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.397Know man from man? Dispute his own estate?Know man, from man? Dispute his owne estate?
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.450You have undone a man of fourscore three,You haue vndone a man of fourescore three,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.532That I may call thee something more than man,That I may call thee something more then man,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.602reasonable man, grew so in love with the wenches' songreasonable man) grew so in loue with the Wenches Song,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.611purses; and had not the old man come in with a hubbubPurses: And had not the old-man come in with a Whoo-bub
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.625Fear not, man: here's no harm intended to thee.Feare not (man) / Here's no harme intended to thee.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.670unjust man doth thrive. What an exchange had this beenvniust man doth thriue. What an exchange had this been,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.681a careful man work.a carefull man worke.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.682See, see, what a man you are now! There is noSee, see: what a man you are now? there is no
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.695his son's pranks too; who, I may say, is no honest man,his Sonnes prancks too; who, I may say, is no honest man,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.748fantastical. A great man, I'll warrant. I know by the pickingfantasticall: A great man, Ile warrant; I know by the picking
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.766will break the back of man, the heart of monster.will breake the back of Man, the heart of Monster.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.777Has the old man e'er a son, sir, do you hear, an'tHa's the old-man ere a Sonne Sir (doe you heare) and't
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.793your behalfs; and if it be in man besides the King toyour behalfes; and if it be in man, besides the King, to
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.794effect your suits, here is man shall do it.effect your Suites, here is man shall doe it.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.802more, and leave this young man in pawn till I bring itmore, and leaue this young man in pawne, till I bring it
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.816this old man does, when the business is performed; andthis old man do's, when the Businesse is performed, and
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.821We are blest in this man, as IWe are bless'd, in this man: as I
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.11Destroyed the sweet'st companion that e'er manDestroy'd the sweet'st Companion, that ere man
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.111More worth than any man; men that she isMore worth then any Man: Men, that she is
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.154To greet a man not worth her pains, much lessTo greet a man, not worth her paines; much lesse,
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.113the old man and his son aboard the Prince; told him Ithe old man and his Sonne aboord the Prince; told him, I
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.17Or hand of man hath done; therefore I keep itOr hand of Man hath done: therefore I keepe it
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.79Could ever yet cut breath? Let no man mock me,Could euer yet cut breath? Let no man mock me,

Poems

 22 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.57 A reverend man that grazed his cattle nigh, A reuerend man that graz'd his cattell ny,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.92 ‘ Small show of man was yet upon his chin, Smal shew of man was yet vpon his chinne,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.2.3 My better angel is a man right fair, My better Angell is a Man (right faire)
The Passionate PilgrimPP.15.15 Then, lullaby, the learned man hath got the lady gay; Then lullaby the learned man hath got the Lady gay,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.20.33 Every man will be thy friend Euery man will be thy friend,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.20.36 No man will supply thy want. No man will supply thy want
The Rape of LucreceLuc.200 A martial man to be soft fancy's slave! A martiall man to be soft fancies slaue,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.587 If ever man were moved with woman's moans, If euer man were mou'd with womãs mones,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.855 ‘ The aged man that coffers up his gold The aged man that coffers vp his gold,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.954 To make the child a man, the man a child, To make the child a man, the man a childe,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1004 The mightier man, the mightier is the thing The mightier man the mightier is the thing
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1254 No man inveigh against the withered flower, No man inueigh against the withered flowre,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1785 That no man could distinguish what he said. That no man could distinguish what he said.
SonnetsSonn.20.7 A man in hue, all hues in his controlling, A man in hew all Hews in his controwling,
SonnetsSonn.34.7 For no man well of such a salve can speak For no man well of such a salue can speake,
SonnetsSonn.116.14 I never writ, nor no man ever loved. I neuer writ, nor no man euer loued.
SonnetsSonn.141.11 Who leaves unswayed the likeness of a man, Who leaues vnswai'd the likenesse of a man,
SonnetsSonn.144.3 The better angel is a man right fair, The better angell is a man right faire :
Venus and AdonisVen.9 Stain to all nymphs, more lovely than a man, Staine to all Nimphs, more louely then a man,
Venus and AdonisVen.214 Thing like a man, but of no woman bred! Thing like a man, but of no woman bred:
Venus and AdonisVen.215 Thou art no man, though of a man's complexion, Thou art no man, though of a mans complexion,
Venus and AdonisVen.369 Would thou wert as I am, and I a man, Would thou wert as I am, and I a man,

Glossary

 71 result(s).
Adonis[pron: a'dohnis] handsome young man loved by Aphrodite (Greek goddess of sexual love) or (in Roman mythology) Venus
artistscholar, intellectual, learned man
arts-manman of learning, scholar
bacheloryoung man
Barbary cock-pigeontype of pigeon from the Barbary coast; [reputedly of Eastern men] man who jealously safeguards his wife
bloodman of fire, hot-blooded fellow, spirited youth
bone(plural) man, person
breatherliving being, creature, man alive
carpet-mongerfrequenter of [carpeted] boudoirs, ladies' man
Centaurcreature with the upper half of a man and the rear legs of a horse; reputed for bestial behaviour
chambererfrequenter of ladies' chambers, drawing-room man of fashion
championwarrior, fighter, man of valour
clerkscholar, sage, man of learning
codpiececloth case or pocket worn by a man at the front of breeches or hose; also: what it contains
corpsebody of a man, dead body
cot-queanman acting the housewife, meddler in household affairs
courageyoung man of bravado, man of spirit
creatureman, human
cuckold[mocking name] dishonour a man by making his wife unfaithful
cuckold[mocking name] man with an unfaithful wife
Damon['daymon] man from Syracuse seen as a model of faithful friendship, offering his life to help his friend Pythias
Dives[pron: 'deevez] in the Bible, a rich man who feasted while the beggar Lazarus starved at his gate
dividualdifferent, separate [i.e. between man and woman]
divinehigh-priest, holy man
doctorlearned man, scholar; or: astrologer, physician
draymanman who drives a cart without wheels [a dray]
fairtime of youth, favourable opportunity [as a young man]
fatherold man, venerable sir
fire-drakefiery being, dragon, man with a fiery nose
gallantfine gentleman, man of fashion
gluttonrich man in the Dives and Lazarus parable
grandsireold man, aged person
heman, person
hoodmanblind man [a call in Blind Man's Buff]
jackfigure of a man who strikes a bell on the outside of a clock
juvenalyouth, young man
ladserving-man, man of low birth [not necessarily young]
Leander[li'ander] young man in love with Hero, who lived on the opposite side of the Hellespont; each night he swam across, guided by her lamp
manattend, serve, wait on [by]
manhuman nature, humanity [as opposed to beasts]
manmanliness, courage, valour
manmanhood, maturity, adulthood
managent, representative
manemploy, exert, send out
manservant, attendant, lackey
man[falconry] tame, make tractable
man at armsfully equipped soldier, heavily armed warrior
man of waxfaultless, perfect [as of a wax model]
manikinlittle man, puppet
mannishof a man, adult, mature
man-of-armssoldier, fighting man
market-manman who trades in a market
martialistsoldier, military man [i.e. follower of Mars]
noviI know the man as well as I know you
pantaloonold man, dotard [i.e. one wearing pantaloons = breeches]
Proteus['prohtius] old man of the sea, shepherd of Poseidon's flock, with the ability to change his shape
scholarlearned man, erudite person [who knows Latin, the language of exorcism]
shadowfictitious name, invented man
sirman, person, individual
sparkyoung blade, man about town, dude
statiststatesman, politician, man of affairs
swainman, youth, young fellow
treble-datedliving three times as long as man
trencher-manhearty eater, good feeder, man of appetite
Typhongiant, half man half animal, who fought against the Olympian gods
ungartereduntied, not wearing a garter [a sign of a lovesick man]
virit's a wise man that says little
whitebeardold man, patriarch, old-timer
wittolcompliant cuckold, man who accepts his wife's infidelity
yeomanman who owns property but is not a gentleman; land-holding farmer
younkerfashionable young man, fine young gentleman

Thesaurus

 80 result(s).
affairs, man ofstatist
aged mangrandsire
alive, manbreather
appetite, man oftrencher-man
blind man [in a game]hoodman
bravado, young man ofcourage
cart without wheels, man who drives adrayman
clock, figure of a man striking a bell on ajack
dishonour a man by making his wife unfaithfulcuckold
drawing-room man of fashionchamberer
fashion, drawing-room man ofchamberer
fashion, man ofgallant
fiery nose, man with afire-drake
fighting manman-of-arms
figure of a man who strikes a bell on the outside of a clockjack
fire, man ofblood
holy mandivine
housewife, man acting thecot-quean
invented manshadow
jacket, man's close-fittingdoublet
ladies' mancarpet-monger
ladies' man of fashionchamberer
learned manartist
learned mandoctor
learned manscholar
learned manclerk
learned manarts-man
little manmanikin
living three times as long as mantreble-dated
low birth, man oflad
manbone
manhe
mansir
mancreature
manswain
man about townspark
man acting the housewifecot-quean
man alivebreather
man of affairsstatist
man of fashiongallant
man of learningclerk
man of learningarts-man
man of learningscholar
man of learningartist
man of learningdoctor
man of low birthlad
man of spiritcourage
man of valourchampion
man of waxwax
man who accepts his wife's infidelitywittol
man who drives a cart without wheelsdrayman
man who owns property but is not a gentlemanyeoman
man who trades in a marketmarket-man
man with an unfaithful wifecuckold
man, holydivine
man, littlemanikin
man, of amannish
man, oldgrandsire
man, oldpantaloon
man, oldwhitebeard
man, oldfather
man, youngbachelor
man, youngjuvenal
military manmartialist
nose, man with a fieryfire-drake
old mangrandsire
old manpantaloon
old manfather
old manwhitebeard
rich manDives
rich manglutton
spirit, man ofcourage
three times living as long as mantreble-dated
unfaithful wife, man with ancuckold
valour, man ofchampion
wax, man ofwax
wife, man with an unfaithfulcuckold
young manbachelor
young manjuvenal
young man, fashionableyounker

Themes and Topics

 18 result(s).
Address forms
Archaisms...k per chorus ii 12 [gower alone] each man / thinks all is writ he speken can ...
...us ii 12 [gower alone of pericles] each man / thinks all is writ he speken can [i e ...
Comparison...s] you are a thousand times a properer man than she a woman and out of you sh...
Elision...he > ’a rj i iii 41 ’a was a merry man it [after a word] > ’t ham v...
...hou > th’ ham v ii 336 as th’art a man us > ’s mac i iii 124 to ...
Exclamations...heerly e3 iv vii 44 cheerily bold man thy soul is all too proud / to yield he...
Functional shift...ve third tnk i ii 96 what man / thirds his own worth adjective to v...
... god cor v iii 11 this last old man godded me indeed   jade*...
...* tit iv i 124 can you hear a good man groan / and not compassion him   ...
How and how...ation] ma iii i 59 i never yet saw man / how wise how noble however to what...
Negatives...me still ham v i 131 [hamlet] what man dost thou dig it for [first clown] for ...
...st thou dig it for [first clown] for no man sir [hamlet] what woman then [first c...
... triple ayl i ii 26 love no man in good earnest nor no further in sport...
Politeness... i pray you one of you question yond man prithee ham ii ii 498 pri...
...rence ce iii ii 93 such a one as a man may not speak of without he say ‘sir-rev...
Responses...ly yes mm ii iii 25 love you the man that wronged you yes as i love the wo...
Thou and you...elationship thou art e’en as just a man ham iii ii 64 hamlet to horatio princ...
Verb forms
Classical mythology...ted by a running brook handsome young man loved by aphrodite greek goddess of sex...
...ast creature with the upper half of a man and the rear legs of a horse reputed fo...
... i have not seen / since hercules a man of tougher sinews (roman form of hera...
... leander crossed the hellespont young man in love with hero priestess of aphrodit...
...quince] &lsquo ninus&rsquo tomb&rsquo man founder of the assyrian city of nine...
...hapes with proteus for advantages old man of the sea shepherd of poseidon' s f...
...d of typhon&rsquo s brood giant half man half animal who fought against the olym...
Non-classical legend, romance, and folklore... colbrand the giant that same mighty man medieval danish champion giant kill...
Religious personalities and beings... 1h4 iii iii 31 bible (luke 16) rich man who feasted while the beggar lazarus sta...
Latin...minem tanquam te (lll v i 9) i know the man as well as i know you obsque hoc nihil...
...uca loquitur (lll iv ii 79) it's a wise man that says little viva voce (h8 ii i 18...
...s hominem (n m ) lll v i 9 homo man homo (n m ) 1h4 ii i 96   ...
... homo (n m ) 1h4 ii i 96   man honorificabili-tudinitatibus lll v...
... (n m ) ts iii i 29 senex of the old man serenissima (adj ) h8 iii i 40 se...
...efeat vir (n m ) lll iv ii 79   man vita (n f ) per ii ii 21   life...
Frequently Encountered Words (FEW)...ertes] for the apparel oft proclaims the man apparel (v ) arrant (adj ) downright ...
...alind of orlando] o that' s a brave man he writes brave verses speaks brave wo...
...r place / in my heart' s love hath no man than yourself tem iii ii 97 [caliban to...
...r i had rather hear you chide than this man woo ayl iv i 32 [rosalind to jaques] al...
...[bedford to messenger] what sayest thou man before dead henry&rsquo s corse count...
...nterfeit the bewitchment of some popular man counterfeit (n ) (adj ) course (n ) ...
...e (v ) 2--3 cuckold (n ) [mocking name] man with an unfaithful wife aw ii ii 24 [cl...
...d rather forsooth go before you like a man forswear (v ) 1 swear falsely perjure ...
...cloten alone] it is not vain-glory for a man and his glass to confer in his own chamb...
...ester to king] i say york is meetest man / to be your regent mac v i 16 [doctor ...
... second officer of antonio] this is the man do thy office see also office (n ) 2--8...
...ii 41 [king henry to exeter] enlarge the man committed yesterday / that railed agains...
...[shepherd to florizel] you have undone a man of fours core three visage (n ) face c...
Abbreviations...[othello to iago of iago's pauses] in a man that's just / they're close denotements...
... 14 [griffith to katherine of wolsey] a man sorely tainted [or sense 2] in other w...

Words Families

 102 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
ALDERMANBASICsee MAN
DRAYMANBASICsee MAN
MANBASICman n, man v, manfully adv, manhood n, mankind n, manlike adj, manly adj, manned adj, mannish adj
MANACTIONfoeman n, full-manned adj, horseman n, horsemanship n, man-at-arms n, sword-man n, three-man adj, war-man n
MANAGEman-child n, man-entered adj
MANCHARACTERmadman n, man-monster n, markman n, please-man n, true-man n, workmanly adv, workmanship n
MANDEATHdeathsman n, double-man n, man-queller n, manslaughter n, slaughterman n
MANGAMEhoodman-blind n
MANJOBapron-man n, arts-man n, bellman n, book-man n, carman n, churchman n, clergyman n, craftsman n, drayman n, ferryman n, fisherman n, guardsman n, handicraftsman n, hangman n, harvest-man n, headsman n, herdsman n, huntsman n, journeyman n, log-man n, market-man n, ploughman n, seaman n, seedsman n, shearman n, shipman n, silkman n, statesman n, tradesman n, trencher-man n, under-hangman n, watchman n, woodman n, workman n
MANMUSICsinging-man n, three-man-song adj
MANPLANTdead-men's-fingers n
MANRANKalderman n, almsman n, beggar-man n, bondman n, footman n, gentleman n, gentlemanlike adj, goodman adj, goodman n, nobleman n, servingman n, yeoman n
MANREGIONcountryman n , Dutchman n, Englishman n, Frenchman n, Irishman n, Kentishman n, Welshman n
MANRELATIONSHIPbeadsman n, henchman n, kinsman n, liegeman n, manikin n, spokesman n
MANSHPman-of-war n
MANNOTunmanly adj, unmanned adj
MANIKINBASICsee MAN
UNMANLYBASICsee MAN
YEOMANBASICsee MAN
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL