Pericles

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Original text
Enter Gower.
Imagine Pericles arriude at Tyre,
Welcomd and setled to his owne desire:
His wofull Queene we leaue at Ephesus,
Vnto Diana ther's a Votarisse.
Now to Marina bend your mind,
Whom our fast growing scene must finde
At Tharsus, and by Cleon traind
In Musicks letters, who hath gaind
Of education all the grace,
Which makes hie both the art and place
Of generall wonder: but alacke
That monster Enuie oft the wracke
Of earned praise, Marinas life
Seeke to take off by treasons knife,
And in this kinde, our Cleon hath
One daughter and a full growne wench,
Euen right for marriage sight : this Maid
Hight Philoten: and it is said
For certaine in our storie, shee
Would euer with Marina bee.
Beet when they weaude the sleded silke,
With fingers long, small, white as milke,
Or when she would with sharpe needle wound,
The Cambricke which she made more sound
By hurting it or when too'th Lute
She sung, and made the night bed mute,
That still records with mone, or when
She would with rich and constant pen,
Vaile to her Mistresse Dian still,
This Phyloten contends in skill
With absolute Marina: so
The Doue of Paphos might with the crow
Vie feathers white, Marina gets
All prayses, which are paid as debts,
And not as giuen, this so darkes
In Phyloten all gracefull markes,
That Cleons wife with Enuie rare,
A present murderer does prepare
For good Marina, that her daughter
Might stand peerlesse by this slaughter.
The sooner her vile thoughts to stead,
Lichorida our nurse is dead,
And cursed Dioniza hath
The pregnant instrument of wrath.
Prest for this blow, the vnborne euent,
I doe commend to your content,
Onely I carried winged Time,
Post one the lame feete of my rime,
Which neuer could I so conuey,
Vnlesse your thoughts went on my way,
Dioniza does appeare,
With Leonine a murtherer.
Exit.
Original text
Act IV, Scene I
Enter Dioniza, with Leonine.

Dion.
Thy oath remember, thou hast sworne to doo't,
tis but a blowe which neuer shall bee knowne,
thou canst not doe a thing in the worlde so soone
to yeelde thee so much profite: let not conscience
which is but cold, in flaming, thy loue bosome,
enflame too nicelie, nor let pittie which
euen women haue cast off, melt thee, but be
a souldier to thy purpose.

Leon.
I will doo't,
but yet she is a goodly creature.

Dion.
The fitter then the Gods should haue her.
Here she comes weeping for her onely Mistresse death,
Thou art resolude.

Leon.
I am resolude.
Enter Marina with a Basket of flowers.

Mari.
No: I will rob Tellus of her weede
to strowe thy greene with Flowers, the yellowes, blewes,
the purple Violets, and Marigolds,
shall as a Carpet hang vpon thy graue,
while Sommer dayes doth last: Aye me poore maid,
borne in a tempest, when my mother dide,
this world to me is a lasting storme,
whirring me from my friends.

Dion.
How now Marina, why doe yow keep alone?
How chaunce my daughter is not with you?
Doe not consume your bloud with sorrowing,
Haue you a nurse of me? Lord how your fauours
Changd with this vnprofitable woe:
Come giue me your flowers, ere the sea marre it,
Walke with Leonine, the ayre is quicke there,
And it perces and sharpens the stomacke,
Come Leonine take her by the arme, walke with her.

Mari.
No I pray you, Ile not bereaue you of your seruat.

Dion.
Come, come,
I loue the king your father, and your selfe,
with more then forraine heart, wee euery day
expect him here, when he shall come and find
our Paragon to all reports thus blasted,
He will repent the breadth of his great voyage,
blame both my Lord and me, that we haue taken
no care to your best courses, go I pray you,
walke and be chearfull once againe, reserue
that excellent complexion, which did steale
the eyes of yong and old. Care not for me,
I can goe home alone.

Mari.
Well, I will goe,
but yet I haue no desire too it.

Dion.
Come, come, I know tis good for you,
walke halfe an houre Leonine, at the least,
remember what I haue sed.

Leon.
I warrant you Madam.

Dion.
Ile leaue you my sweete Ladie, for a while,
pray walke softly, doe not heate your bloud,
what, I must haue care of you.

Mari.
My thanks sweete Madame,
Is this wind Westerlie that blowes?

Leon.
Southwest.

Mari.
When I was borne the wind was North.

Leon
Wast so?

Mari.
My father, as nurse ses, did neuer feare,
but cryed good sea-men to the Saylers, galling
his kingly hands haling ropes,
and clasping to the Mast, endured a
sea that almost burst the decke.

Leon.
When was this?

Mari.
When I was borne,
neuer was waues nor winde more violent,
and from the ladder tackle, washes off
a canuas clymer, ha ses one, wolt out?
and with a dropping industrie they skip
from sterne to sterne, the Boatswaine whistles, and
the Maister calles and trebles their confusion.

Leon.
Come say your prayers.

Mari.
What meane you?

Leon.
If you require a little space for praier,
I graunt it, pray, but bee not tedious, for
the Gods are quicke of eare, and I am sworne
to do my worke with haste.

Mari.
Why will you kill me?

Leon.
To satisfie my Ladie.

Mari.
Why would shee haue mee kild
now? as I can remember by my troth,
I neuer did her hurt in all my life,
I neuer spake bad worde, nor did ill turne
to anie liuing creature: Beleeue me law,
I neuer killd a Mouse, nor hurt a Fly:
I trode vpon a worme against my will,
but I wept fort. How haue I offended,
wherein my death might yeeld her anie profit,
or my life imply her any danger?

Leon.
My Commission
is not to reason of the deed, but doo't.

Mari.
You will not doo't for all the world I hope:
you are well fauoured, and your lookes foreshew
you haue a gentle heart, I saw you latelie
when you caught hurt in parting two that fought:
good sooth it shewde well in you, do so now,
your Ladie seekes my life Come, you betweene,
and saue poore mee the weaker.

Leon.
I am sworne
and will dispatch.
Enter Pirats.

Pirat.1.
Hold villaine.

Pira.2.
A prize, a prize.

Pirat.3.
Halfe part mates, halfe part. Come lets
haue her aboord sodainly.
Exit.
Enter Leonine.

Leon.
These rogueing theeues serue the great Pyrato Valdes,
and they haue seizd Marina, let her goe,
ther's no hope shee will returne, Ile sweare shees dead,
and throwne into the Sea, but ile see further:
perhappes they will but please themselues vpon her,
not carrie her aboord, if shee remaine
Whome they haue rauisht, must by mee be slaine.
Exit.
Original text
Act IV, Scene II
Enter the three Bawdes.

Pander.
Boult.

Boult.
Sir.

Pander.
Searche the market narrowely, Mettelyne is full of
gallants, wee lost too much much money this mart by beeing too
wenchlesse.

Bawd.
Wee were neuer so much out of Creatures, we haue
but poore three, and they can doe no more then they can
doe, and they with continuall action, are euen as good as
rotten.

Pander.
Therefore lets haue fresh ones what ere wee pay
for them, if there bee not a conscience to be vsde in euerie
trade, wee shall neuer prosper.

Bawd.
Thou sayst true, tis not our bringing vp of poore
bastards, as I thinke, I haue brought vp some eleuen.

Boult.
I to eleuen, and brought them downe againe, but
shall I searche the market?

Bawde.
What else man? the stuffe we haue, a strong winde
will blowe it to peeces, they are so pittifully sodden.

Pandor.
Thou sayest true, ther's two vnwholesome a
conscience, the poore Transiluanian is dead that laye
with the little baggadge.

Boult.
I, shee quickly poupt him, she made him roast-
meate for wormes, but Ile goe searche the market.
Exit.

Pand.
Three or foure thousande Checkins were as prettie
a proportion to liue quietly, and so giue ouer.

Bawd.
Why, to giue ouer I pray you? Is it a shame to get
when wee are olde?

Pand.
Oh our credite comes not in like the commoditie,
nor the commoditie wages not with the daunger: therefore
if in our youthes we could picke vp some prettie
estate, t'were not amisse to keepe our doore hatch't,
besides the sore tearmes we stand vpon with the gods, wilbe
strong with vs for giuing ore.

Bawd.
Come other sorts offend as well as wee.

Pand.
As well as wee. I, and better too, wee offende
worse, neither is our profession any trade, It's no
calling, but heere comes Boult.
Enter Boult with the Pirates and Marina.

Boult.
Come your wayes my maisters, you say shee's a
virgin.

Sayler.
O Sir, wee doubt it not.

Boult.
Master, I haue gone through for this peece you see,
if you like her so, if not I haue lost my earnest.

Bawd.
Boult, has shee anie qualities?

Boult.
Shee has a good face, speakes well, and has excellent
good cloathes: theres no farther necessitie of qualities
can make her be refuz'd.

Bawd,
What's her price Boult?

Boult.
I cannot be bated one doit of a thousand peeces.

Pand.
Well, follow me my maisters, you shall haue
your money presenly, wife take her in, instruct her
what she has to doe, that she may not be rawe in her
entertainment.

Bawd.
Boult, take you the markes of her, the colour of her
haire, complexion, height, her age, with warrant of her
virginitie, and crie; He that wil giue most shal haue her
first, such a maydenhead were no cheape thing, if men
were as they haue beene: get this done as I command
you.

Boult.
Performance shall follow.
Exit.

Mar.
Alacke that Leonine was so slacke, so slow,
he should haue strooke, not spoke, or that these Pirates,
not enough barbarous, had not oreboord
throwne me, for to seeke my mother.

Bawd.
Why lament you prettie one?

Mar.
That I am prettie.

Bawd.
Come, the Gods haue done their part in you.

Mar.
I accuse them not.

Bawd.
You are light into my hands, where you are like to
liue.

Mar.
The more my fault,
to scape his handes, where I was to die.

Bawd.
I, and you shall liue in peasure.

Mar.
No.

Bawd.
Yes indeed shall you, and taste Gentlemen of all
fashions, you shall fare well, you shall haue the
difference of all complexions, what doe you stop your
eares?

Mar.
Are you a woman?

Bawd.
What would you haue mee be, and I bee not a woman?

Mar.
An honest woman, or not a woman.

Bawd.
Marie whip the Gosseling, I thinke I shall haue something
to doe with you, come you'r a young foolish
sapling, and must be bowed as I would haue you.

Mar.
The Gods defend me.

Baud.
If it please the Gods to defend you by men, then
men must comfort you, men must feed you, men stir
you vp: Boults returnd.

Now sir, hast thou cride her through the Market?

Boult.
I haue cryde her almost to the number of her haires,
I haue drawne her picture with my voice.

Baud.
And I prethee tell me, how dost thou find the
inclination of the people, especially of the yonger sort?

Boult.
Faith they listened to mee, as they would haue
harkened to their fathers testament, there was a
Spaniards mouth watred, and he went to bed to her
verie description.

Baud.
We shall haue him here to morrow with his best
ruffe on.

Boult.
To night, to night, but Mistresse doe you knowe the
French knight, that cowres ethe hams?

Baud.
Who, Mounsieur Verollus?

Boult.
I, he, he offered to cut a caper at the proclamation,
but he made a groane at it, and swore he would see
her to morrow.

Baud.
Well, well, as for him, hee brought his disease
hither, here he does but repaire it, I knowe hee will come in
our shadow, to scatter his crownes in the Sunne.

Boult.
Well, if we had of euerie Nation a traueller, wee
should lodge them with this signe.

Baud.
Pray you come hither a while, you
haue Fortunes comming vppon you, marke mee, you must
seeme to doe that fearefully, which you commit willingly,
despise profite, where you haue most gaine, to weepe that
you liue as yee doe, makes pittie in your Louers seldome, but
that pittie begets you a good opinion, and that opinion a
meere profite.

Mari.
I vnderstand you not.

Boult.
O take her home Mistresse, take her home, these
blushes of hers must bee quencht with some present
practise.

Mari.
Thou sayest true yfaith, so they must, for your
Bride goes to that with shame, which is her way to goe
with warrant.

Boult.
Faith some doe, and some doe not, but Mistresse if
I haue bargaind for the ioynt.

Baud.
Thou maist cut a morsell off the spit.

Boult.
I may so.

Baud.
Who should denie it? Come young one, I like the
manner of your garments well.

Boult.
I by my faith, they shall not be changd yet.

Baud.
Boult, spend thou that in the towne: report what a
soiourner we haue, youle loose nothing by custome.
When Nature framde this peece, shee meant thee a good
turne, therefore say what a parragon she is, and thou hast
the haruest out of thine owne report.

Boult.
I warrant you Mistresse, thunder shall not so awake
the beds of Eeles, as my giuing out her beautie stirs vp the
lewdly enclined, Ile bring home some to night.

Baud.
Come your wayes, follow me.

Mari.
If fires be hote, kniues sharpe, or waters deepe,
Vntide I still my virgin knot will keepe.
Diana ayde my purpose.

Baud.
What haue we to doe with Diana, pray you will you
goe with vs?
Exit.
Original text
Act IV, Scene III
Enter Cleon, and Dioniza.

Dion.
Why ere you foolish, can it be vndone?

Cleon.
O Dioniza, such a peece of slaughter,
The Sunne and Moone nere lookt vpon.

Dion.
I thinke youle turne a chidle agen.

Cleon.
Were I chiefe Lord of all this spacious world,
Ide giue it to vndo the deede. O Ladie
much lesse in bloud then vertue, yet a Princes
to equall any single Crowne ath earth
ith Iustice of compare, O villaine, Leonine
whom thou hast poisned too,
if thou hadst drunke to him tad beene a kindnesse
becomming well thy face, what canst thou say
when noble Pericles shall demaund his child?

Dion.
That shee is dead. Nurses are not the fates
to foster it, not euer to preserue,
she dide at night, Ile say so, who can crosse it
vnlesse you play the impious Innocent,
and for an honest attribute, crie out
shee dyde by foule play.

Cle.
O goe too, well, well,
of all the faults beneath the heauens, the Gods
doe like this worst.

Dion.
Be one of those that thinkes
the pettie wrens of Tharsus will flie hence,
and open this to Pericles, I do shame
to thinke of what a noble straine you are,
and of how coward a spirit.

Cle.
To such proceeding
who euer but his approbation added,
though not his prince consent, he did not flow
from honourable courses.

Dion.
Be it so then,
yet none does knowe but you how shee came dead,
nor none can knowe Leonine being gone.
Shee did disdaine my childe, and stoode betweene
her and her fortunes : none woulde looke on her,
but cast their gazes on Marianas face,
whilest ours was blurted at, and helde a Mawkin
not worth the time of day. It pierst me thorow,
and though you call my course vnnaturall,
you not your childe well louing, yet I finde
it greets mee as an enterprize of kindnesse
performd to your sole daughter.

Cle.
Heauens forgiue it.

Dion.
And as for Pericles,
what should hee say, we wept after her hearse,
& yet we mourne, her monument
is almost finished, & her epitaphs
in glittring gold? characters expres
a generrall prayse to her, and care in vs
at whose expence tis done.

Cle.
Thou art like the Harpie,
Which to betray, doest with thine Angells face
ceaze with thine Eagles talents.

Dion.
Yere like one that supersticiously,
Doe sweare too'th Gods, that Winter kills / The Fliies,
but yet I know, youle doe as I aduise.
Original text
Act IV, Scene IV


Gower.
Thus time we waste, & long leagues make short,
Saile seas in Cockles, haue and wish but fort,
Making to take our imagination,
From bourne to bourne, region to region,
By you being pardoned we commit no crime,
To vse one language, in each seuerall clime,
Where our sceanes seemes to liue, / I doe beseech you
To learne of me who stand with gappes / To teach you.
The stages of our storie Pericles
Is now againe thwarting thy wayward seas,
Attended on by many a Lord and Knight,
To see his daughter all his liues delight.
Old Helicanus goes along behind,
Is left to gouerne it, you beare in mind.
Old Escenes, whom Hellicanus late
Aduancde in time to great and hie estate.
Well sayling ships, and bounteous winds / Haue brought
This king to Tharsus, thinke this Pilat thought
So with his sterage, shall your thoughts grone
To fetch his daughter home, who first is gone
Like moats and shadowes, see them / Moue a while,
Your eares vnto your eyes Ile reconcile.
Enter Pericles at one doore, with all his trayne, Cleon and
Dioniza at the other. Cleon shewes Pericles the tombe,
whereat Pericles makes lamentation, puts on sacke-cloth,
and in a mighty passion departs.
See how beleefe may suffer by fowle showe,
This borrowed passion stands for true olde woe:
And Pericles in sorrowe all deuour'd,
With sighes shot through, and biggest teares ore-showr'd.
Leaues Tharsus, and againe imbarques, hee sweares
Neuer to wash his face, nor cut his hayres:
Hee put on sack-cloth, and to Sea he beares,
A Tempest which his mortall vessell teares.
And yet hee rydes it out, Nowe please you wit:
The Epitaph is for Marina writ,
by wicked Dioniza.
The fairest, sweetest and best lyes heere,
Who withered in her spring of yeare:
She was of Tyrus the Kings daughter,
On whom fowle death hath made this slaughter.
Marina was shee call'd, and at her byrth,
Thetis being prowd, swallowed some part ath'earth:
Therefore the earth fearing to be ore-flowed,
Hath Thetis byrth-childe on the heauens bestowed.
Wherefore she does and sweares sheele neuer stint,
Make raging Battery vpon shores of flint.
No vizor does become blacke villanie,
So well as soft and tender flatterie:
Let Pericles beleeue his daughter's dead,
And beare his courses to be ordered;
By Lady Fortune, while our Steare must play,
His daughters woe and heauie welladay.
In her vnholie seruice: Patience then,
And thinke you now are all in Mittelin.
Exit.
Original text
Act IV, Scene V
Enter two Gentlemen.

1.Gent.
Did you euer heare the like?

2.Gent.
No, nor neuer shall doe in such a
place as this, shee beeing once gone.

1.
But to haue diuinitie preach't there,
did you euer dreame of such a thing?

2.
No, no, come, I am for no more
bawdie houses, shall's goe heare the Vestalls sing?

1.
Ile doe any thing now that is vertuous,
but I am out of the road of rutting for euer.
Exit.
Original text
Act IV, Scene VI
Enter Bawdes 3.

Pand.
Well, I had rather then twice the worth of her
shee had nere come heere.

Bawd.
Fye, fye, vpon her, shee's able to freze the god
Priapus, and vndoe a whole generation, we must either
get her rauished, or be rid of her, when she should
doe for Clyents her fitment, and doe mee the kindenesse of our
profession, shee has me her quirks, her reasons, her
master reasons, her prayers, her knees, that shee would
make a Puritaine of the diuell, if hee should cheapen a kisse
of her.

Boult.
Faith I must rauish her, or shee'le disfurnish vs
of all our Caualereea, and make our swearers priests.

Pand.
Now the poxe vpon her greene sicknes for mee.

Bawd.
Faith ther's no way to be ridde on't but by the way
to the pox. Here comes the Lord Lysimachus disguised.

Boult.
Wee should haue both Lorde and Lowne, if the peeuish
baggadge would but giue way to customers.
Enter Lysimachus.

Lysim.
How now, how a douzen of virginities?

Bawd.
Now the Gods to blesse your Honour.

Boult.
I am glad to see your Honour in good health.

Li.
You may , so t'is the better for you that
your resorters stand vpon sound legges, how now? wholsome
iniquitie haue you, that a man may deale withall, and
defie the Surgion?

Bawd.
Wee haue heere one Sir, if shee would, but there
neuer came her like in Meteline.

Li.
If shee'd doe the deedes of darknes thou
wouldst say.

Bawd.
Your Honor knows what t'is to say wel enough.

Li.
Well, call forth, call forth.

Boult.
For flesh and bloud Sir, white and red, you shall
see a rose, and she were a rose indeed, if shee had but.

Li.
What prithi?

Boult.
O Sir, I can be modest.

Li.
That dignities the renowne of a Bawde, no
lesse then it giues a good report to a number to be chaste.

Bawd.
Heere comes that which growes to the stalke, / Neuer
pluckt yet I can assure you.
Is shee not a faire creature?

Ly.
Faith shee would serue after a long voyage
at Sea, Well theres for you,
leaue vs.

Bawd.
I beseeche your Honor giue me leaue a word, / And
Ile haue done presently.

Li.
I beseech you doe.

Bawd.
First, I would haue you note, this is an
Honorable man.

Mar.
I desire to finde him so, that I may worthilie note
him.

Bawd.
Next hees the Gouernor of this countrey, and a man
whom I am bound too.

Ma.
If he gouerne the countrey you are bound to him
indeed, but how honorable hee is in that, I knowe not.

Bawd.
Pray you without anie more virginall fencing, will
you vse him kindly? he will lyne your apron with gold.

Ma.
What hee will doe gratiously, I will thankfully
receiue.

Li.
Ha you done?

Bawd.
My Lord shees not pac'ste yet, you must take some
paines to worke her to your mannage, come wee will leaue
his Honor, and her together, goe thy wayes.

Li.
Now prittie one, how long haue you beene
at this trade?

Ma.
What trade Sir?

Li.
Why, I cannot name but I shall offend.

Ma.
I cannot be offended with my trade, please you
to name it.

Li.
How long haue you bene of this profession?

Ma.
Ere since I can remember.

Li.
Did you goe too't so young, were you a
gamester at fiue, or at seuen?

Ma.
Earlyer too Sir, if now I bee one.

Ly.
Why? the house you dwell in proclaimes you
to be a Creature of sale.

Ma.
Doe you knowe this house to be a place of such
resort, and will come intoo't? I heare say you're of
honourable parts, and are the Gouernour of this place.

Li.
Why, hath your principall made knowne
vnto you who I am?

Ma.
Who is my principall?

Li.
Why, your hearbe-woman, she that sets
seeds and rootes of shame and iniquitie. O you haue
heard something of my power, and so stand aloft for
more serious wooing, but I protest to thee prettie one,
my authoritie shall not see thee, or else looke friendly
vpon thee, come bring me to some priuate place:
Come, come.

Ma.
If you were borne to honour, shew it now,
if put vpon you, make the iudgement good,
that thought you worthie of it.

Li.
How's this? how's this? some more, be sage.

Mar.
For me
that am a maide, though most vngentle Fortune
haue plac't mee in this Stie, where since I came,
diseases haue beene solde deerer then Phisicke,
that the gods
would set me free from this vnhalowed place,
though they did chaunge mee to the meanest byrd
that flyes i'th purer ayre.

Li.
I did not thinke thou couldst haue spoke so well,
nere dremp't thou could'st,
had I brought hither a corrupted minde,
thy speeche had altered it, holde, heeres golde for thee,
perseuer in that cleare way thou goest
and the gods strengthen thee.

Ma.
The good Gods preserue you.

Li.
For me be you thoughten,
that I came with no ill intent, for to me
the very dores and windows sauor vilely,
fare thee well, thou art a peece of vertue, &
I doubt not but thy training hath bene noble,
hold, heeres more golde for thee,
a curse vpon him, die he like a theefe
that robs thee of thy goodnes, if thou doest
heare from me it shalbe for thy good.

Boult.
I beseeche your Honor one peece for me.

Li.
Auaunt thou damned dore-keeper,
your house but for this virgin that doeth prop it,
would sincke and ouerwhelme you. Away.

Boult.
How's this? wee must take another course with
you? if your peeuish chastitie, which is not worth a
breakefast in the cheapest countrey vnder the coap, shall
vndoe a whole houshold, let me be gelded like a spaniel,
come your wayes.

Ma.
Whither would you haue mee?

Boult.
I must haue your mayden-head taken off, or the
comon hag-man shal execute it, come your way,
weele haue no more Gentlemen driuen away, come your
wayes I say.
Enter Bawdes.

Bawd.
How now, whats the matter?

Boult.
Worse and worse mistris, shee has heere spoken
holie words to the Lord Lisimachus.

Bawd.
O abhominable.

Boult.
He makes our profession as it were to stincke afore
the face of the gods.

Bawd.
Marie hang her vp for euer.

Boult.
The Noble man would haue dealt with her like a
Noble man, and shee sent him away as colde as a Snoweball,
saying his prayers too.

Bawd.
Boult take her away, vse her at thy pleasure,
crack the glasse of her virginitie, and make the rest
maliable.

Boult.
And if shee were a thornyer peece of ground then shee
is, shee shall be plowed.

Ma.
Harke, harke you Gods.

Bawd.
She coniures, away with her, would she had neuer
come within my doores, Marrie hang you: shees borne to
vndoe vs, will you not goe the way of wemen-kinde?
Marry come vp my dish of chastitie with rosemary &
baies.

Boult.
Come mistris, come your way with mee.

Ma.
Whither wilt thou haue mee?

Boult.
To take from you the Iewell you hold so deere.

Ma.
Prithee tell mee one thing first.

Boult.
Come now your one thing.

Ma.
What canst thou wish thine enemie to be.

Boult.
Why, I could wish him to bee my master, or rather
my mistris.

Ma.
Neither of these are so bad as thou art,
since they doe better thee in their command,
thou hold'st a place
for which the painedst feende of hell
would not in reputation change: Thou art
the damned doore-keeper to euery custerell
that comes enquiring for his Tib.
To the cholerike fisting of euery rogue,
thy eare is lyable, thy foode is such
as hath beene belch't on by infected lungs.

Bo.
What wold you haue me do? go to the wars,
wold you? wher a man may serue 7. yeers for the
losse of a leg, & haue not money enough in the end to
buy him a woodden one?

Ma.
Doe any thing but this
thou doest, emptie olde receptacles,
or common-shores of filthe,
serue by indenture, to the common hang-man,
anie of these wayes are yet better then this:
for what thou professest, a Baboone could he
speak, would owne a name too deere, that the gods
wold safely deliuer me from this place:
here, heers gold for thee,
if that thy master would gaine by me,
proclaime that I can sing, weaue, sow, & dance,
with other vertues, which Ile keep from boast,
and will vndertake all these to teache.
I doubt not but this populous Cittie will
yeelde manie schollers.

Boult.
But can you teache all this you speake of?

Ma.
Prooue that I cannot, take mee home againe,
And prostitute mee to the basest groome
that doeth frequent your house.

Boult.
Well I will see what I can doe for thee: if I can
place thee I will.

Ma.
But amongst honest woman.

Boult.
Faith my acquaintance lies little amongst them,
But since my master and mistris hath bought you,
theres no going but by their consent: therefore I will
make them acquainted with your purpose, and I doubt
not but I shall finde them tractable enough. Come, Ile
doe for thee what I can, come your wayes.
Exeunt.
Modern text
IV CHORUS
Enter Gower

GOWER
Imagine Pericles arrived at Tyre,
Welcomed and settled to his own desire.
His woeful queen we leave at Ephesus,
Unto Diana there's a votaress.
Now to Marina bend your mind,
Whom our fast-growing scene must find
At Tarsus, and by Cleon trained
In music's letters; who hath gained
Of education all the grace,
Which makes her both the heart and place
Of general wonder. But, alack,
That monster envy, oft the wrack
Of earned praise, Marina's life
Seeks to take off by treason's knife.
And in this kind, our Cleon hath
One daughter and a full-grown wench,
Even ripe for marriage-rite. This maid
Hight Philoten, and it is said
For certain in our story she
Would ever with Marina be;
Be't when she weaved the sleded silk
With fingers long, small, white as milk;
Or when she would with sharp needle wound
The cambric, which she made more sound
By hurting it; or when to th' lute
She sung, and made the night-bird mute,
That still records with moan; or when
She would with rich and constant pen
Vail to her mistress Dian. Still
This Philoten contends in skill
With absolute Marina. So
With dove of Paphos might the crow
Vie feathers white. Marina gets
All praises, which are paid as debts,
And not as given. This so darks
In Philoten all graceful marks
That Cleon's wife, with envy rare,
A present murderer does prepare
For good Marina, that her daughter
Might stand peerless by this slaughter.
The sooner her vile thoughts to stead,
Lychorida, our nurse, is dead,
And cursed Dionyza hath
The pregnant instrument of wrath
Prest for this blow. The unborn event
I do commend to your content.
Only I carry winged time
Post on the lame feet of my rhyme,
Which never could I so convey
Unless your thoughts went on my way.
Dionyza does appear
With Leonine, a murderer.
Exit
Modern text
Act IV, Scene I
Enter Dionyza with Leonine

DIONYZA
Thy oath remember. Thou hast sworn to do't.
'Tis but a blow, which never shall be known.
Thou canst not do a thing in the world so soon
To yield thee so much profit. Let not conscience,
Which is but cold, inflaming love in thy bosom,
Inflame too nicely; nor let pity, which
Even women have cast off, melt thee, but be
A soldier to thy purpose.

LEONINE
I will do't –
But yet she is a goodly creature.

DIONYZA
The fitter then the gods should have her.
Here she comes weeping for her only mistress' death.
Thou art resolved?

LEONINE
I am resolved.
Enter Marina with a basket of flowers

MARINA
No, I will rob Tellus of her weed
To strew thy green with flowers. The yellows, blues,
The purple violets, and marigolds
Shall as a carpet hang upon thy grave
While summer days doth last. Ay me, poor maid,
Born in a tempest when my mother died,
This world to me is like a lasting storm,
Whirring me from my friends.

DIONYZA
How now, Marina? Why do you keep alone?
How chance my daughter is not with you?
Do not consume your blood with sorrowing;
You have a nurse of me. Lord, how your favour's
Changed with this unprofitable woe!
Come, give me your flowers. On the sea-margent
Walk with Leonine. The air is quick there,
And it pierces and sharpens the stomach.
Come, Leonine. Take her by the arm, walk with her.

MARINA
No, I pray you. I'll not bereave you of your servant.

DIONYZA
Come, come.
I love the King your father and yourself
With more than foreign heart. We every day
Expect him here. When he shall come and find
Our paragon to all reports thus blasted,
He will repent the breadth of his great voyage,
Blame both my lord and me that we have taken
No care to your best courses. Go, I pray you.
Walk and be cheerful once again. Reserve
That excellent complexion which did steal
The eyes of young and old. Care not for me;
I can go home alone.

MARINA
Well, I will go,
But yet I have no desire to it.

DIONYZA
Come, come, I know 'tis good for you.
Walk half an hour, Leonine, at the least.
Remember what I have said.

LEONINE
I warrant you, madam.

DIONYZA
I'll leave you, my sweet lady, for a while.
Pray walk softly, do not heat your blood.
What! I must have care of you.

MARINA
My thanks, sweet madam.
Exit Dionyza
Is this wind westerly that blows?

LEONINE
South-west.

MARINA
When I was born the wind was north.

LEONINE
Was't so?

MARINA
My father, as nurse says, did never fear,
But cried ‘ Good seaman!’ to the sailors, galling
His kingly hands haling ropes,
And, clasping to the mast, endured a sea
That almost burst the deck.

LEONINE
When was this?

MARINA
When I was born.
Never was waves nor wind more violent,
And from the ladder-tackle washes off
A canvas-climber. ‘ Ha!’ says one, ‘ wolt out?’
And with a dropping industry they skip
From stem to stern. The boatswain whistles, and
The master calls and trebles their confusion.

LEONINE
Come, say your prayers.

MARINA
What mean you?

LEONINE
If you require a little space for prayer,
I grant it. Pray; but be not tedious, for
The gods are quick of ear, and I am sworn
To do my work with haste.

MARINA
Why will you kill me?

LEONINE
To satisfy my lady.

MARINA
Why would she have me killed?
Now, as I can remember, by my troth,
I never did her hurt in all my life.
I never spake bad word nor did ill turn
To any living creature. Believe me, law,
I never killed a mouse, nor hurt a fly.
I trod upon a worm against my will,
But I wept for't. How have I offended,
Wherein my death might yield her any profit,
Or my life imply her any danger?

LEONINE
My commission
Is not to reason of the deed, but do't.

MARINA
You will not do't for all the world, I hope.
You are well favoured, and your looks foreshow
You have a gentle heart. I saw you lately
When you caught hurt in parting two that fought.
Good sooth, it showed well in you. Do so now.
Your lady seeks my life; come you between,
And save poor me, the weaker.

LEONINE
I am sworn,
And will dispatch.
He seizes her
Enter Pirates

FIRST PIRATE
Hold, villain!
Leonine runs away

SECOND PIRATE
A prize, a prize!

THIRD PIRATE
Half-part, mates, half-part. Come, let's
have her aboard suddenly.
Exeunt Pirates, carrying off Marina
Enter Leonine

LEONINE
These roguing thieves serve the great pirate Valdes,
And they have seized Marina. Let her go.
There's no hope she will return. I'll swear she's dead,
And thrown into the sea. But I'll see further.
Perhaps they will but please themselves upon her,
Not carry her aboard. If she remain,
Whom they have ravished must by me be slain.
Exit
Modern text
Act IV, Scene II
Enter the three Bawds

PANDAR
Boult!

BOULT
Sir?

PANDAR
Search the market narrowly. Mytilene is full of
gallants. We lost too much money this mart by being too
wenchless.

BAWD
We were never so much out of creatures. We have
but poor three, and they can do no more than they can
do. And they with continual action are even as good as
rotten.

PANDAR
Therefore let's have fresh ones, whate'er we pay
for them. If there be not a conscience to be used in every
trade, we shall never prosper.

BAWD
Thou sayst true. 'Tis not our bringing up of poor
bastards – as, I think, I have brought up some eleven –

BOULT
Ay, to eleven, and brought them down again. But
shall I search the market?

BAWD
What else, man? The stuff we have, a strong wind
will blow it to pieces, they are so pitifully sodden.

PANDAR
Thou sayst true, there's two unwholesome, o'
conscience. The poor Transylvanian is dead that lay
with the little baggage.

BOULT
Ay, she quickly pooped him; she made him roast
meat for worms. But I'll go search the market.
Exit

PANDAR
Three or four thousand chequins were as pretty
a proportion to live quietly, and so give over.

BAWD
Why to give over, I pray you? Is it a shame to get
when we are old?

PANDAR
O, our credit comes not in like the commodity,
nor the commodity wages not with the danger. Therefore,
if in our youths we could pick up some pretty
estate, 'twere not amiss to keep our door hatched.
Besides, the sore terms we stand upon with the gods will
be strong with us for giving o'er.

BAWD
Come, other sorts offend as well as we.

PANDAR
As well as we? Ay, and better too; we offend
worse. Neither is our profession any trade; it's no
calling. But here comes Boult.
Enter Boult with the Pirates and Marina

BOULT
Come your ways, my masters. You say she's a
virgin?

FIRST PIRATE
O, sir, we doubt it not.

BOULT
Master, I have gone through for this piece you see.
If you like her, so. If not, I have lost my earnest.

BAWD
Boult, has she any qualities?

BOULT
She has a good face, speaks well, and has excellent
good clothes. There's no further necessity of qualities
can make her be refused.

BAWD
What's her price, Boult?

BOULT
I cannot be bated one doit of a thousand pieces.

PANDAR
Well, follow me, my masters; you shall have
your money presently. Wife, take her in. Instruct her
what she has to do, that she may not be raw in her
entertainment.
Exeunt Pandar and Pirates

BAWD
Boult, take you the marks of her, the colour of her
hair, complexion, height, her age, with warrant of her
virginity, and cry ‘ He that will give most shall have her
first.’ Such a maidenhead were no cheap thing, if men
were as they have been. Get this done as I command
you.

BOULT
Performance shall follow.
Exit

MARINA
Alack that Leonine was so slack, so slow!
He should have struck, not spoke. Or that these pirates,
Not enough barbarous, had not o'erboard
Thrown me for to seek my mother!

BAWD
Why lament you, pretty one?

MARINA
That I am pretty.

BAWD
Come, the gods have done their part in you.

MARINA
I accuse them not.

BAWD
You are light into my hands, where you are like to
live.

MARINA
The more my fault
To 'scape his hands where I was like to die.

BAWD
Ay, and you shall live in pleasure.

MARINA
No.

BAWD
Yes, indeed shall you, and taste gentlemen of all
fashions. You shall fare well. You shall have the
difference of all complexions. What! do you stop your
ears?

MARINA
Are you a woman?

BAWD
What would you have me be, an I be not a woman?

MARINA
An honest woman, or not a woman.

BAWD
Marry, whip the gosling. I think I shall have something
to do with you. Come, you're a young foolish
sapling, and must be bowed as I would have you.

MARINA
The gods defend me!

BAWD
If it please the gods to defend you by men, then
men must comfort you, men must feed you, men stir
you up. Boult's returned.
Enter Boult
Now, sir, hast thou cried her through the market?

BOULT
I have cried her almost to the number of her hairs.
I have drawn her picture with my voice.

BAWD
And I prithee tell me, how dost thou find the
inclination of the people, especially of the younger sort?

BOULT
Faith, they listened to me as they would have
hearkened to their father's testament. There was a
Spaniard's mouth watered, and he went to bed to her
very description.

BAWD
We shall have him here tomorrow with his best
ruff on.

BOULT
Tonight, tonight. But, mistress, do you know the
French knight, that cowers i'the hams?

BAWD
Who, Monsieur Veroles?

BOULT
Ay, he. He offered to cut a caper at the proclamation,
but he made a groan at it, and swore he would see
her tomorrow.

BAWD
Well, well, as for him, he brought his disease
hither; here he does but repair it. I know he will come in
our shadow to scatter his crowns of the sun.

BOULT
Well, if we had of every nation a traveller, we
should lodge them with this sign.

BAWD
(to Marina)
Pray you, come hither awhile. You
have fortunes coming upon you. Mark me. You must
seem to do that fearfully which you commit willingly;
despise profit where you have most gain. To weep that
you live as ye do makes pity in your lovers. Seldom but
that pity begets you a good opinion, and that opinion a
mere profit.

MARINA
I understand you not.

BOULT
O, take her home, mistress, take her home. These
blushes of hers must be quenched with some present
practice.

BAWD
Thou sayst true, i'faith, so they must, for your
bride goes to that with shame which is her way to go
with warrant.

BOULT
Faith, some do and some do not. But, mistress, if
I have bargained for the joint –

BAWD
Thou mayst cut a morsel off the spit.

BOULT
I may so.

BAWD
Who should deny it? Come, young one, I like the
manner of your garments well.

BOULT
Ay, by my faith, they shall not be changed yet.

BAWD
Boult, spend thou that in the town. Report what a
sojourner we have. You'll lose nothing by custom.
When nature framed this piece, she meant thee a good
turn. Therefore say what a paragon she is, and thou hast
the harvest out of thine own report.

BOULT
I warrant you, mistress, thunder shall not so awake
the beds of eels as my giving out her beauty stirs up the
lewdly inclined. I'll bring home some tonight.

BAWD
(to Marina)
Come your ways. Follow me.

MARINA
If fires be hot, knives sharp, or waters deep,
Untied I still my virgin knot will keep.
Diana, aid my purpose!

BAWD
What have we to do with Diana? Pray you, will you
go with us?
Exeunt
Modern text
Act IV, Scene III
Enter Cleon and Dionyza

DIONYZA
Why, are you foolish? Can it be undone?

CLEON
O Dionyza, such a piece of slaughter
The sun and moon ne'er looked upon.

DIONYZA
I think you'll turn a child again.

CLEON
Were I chief lord of all this spacious world,
I'd give it to undo the deed. A lady
Much less in blood than virtue, yet a princess
To equal any single crown o'th' earth
I'th' justice of compare. O villain Leonine!
Whom thou hast poisoned too.
If thou hadst drunk to him, 't had been a kindness
Becoming well thy fact. What canst thou say
When noble Pericles shall demand his child?

DIONYZA
That she is dead. Nurses are not the Fates.
To foster is not ever to preserve.
She died at night. I'll say so. Who can cross it?
Unless you play the impious innocent,
And, for an honest attribute, cry out
‘ She died by foul play.’

CLEON
O, go to! Well, well,
Of all the faults beneath the heavens, the gods
Do like this worst.

DIONYZA
Be one of those that thinks
The petty wrens of Tarsus will fly hence
And open this to Pericles. I do shame
To think of what a noble strain you are,
And of how coward a spirit.

CLEON
To such proceeding
Whoever but his approbation added,
Though not his prime consent, he did not flow
From honourable courses.

DIONYZA
Be it so, then.
Yet none does know but you how she came dead,
Nor none can know, Leonine being gone.
She did disdain my child, and stood between
Her and her fortunes. None would look on her,
But cast their gazes on Marina's face,
Whilst ours was blurted at, and held a malkin,
Not worth the time of day. It pierced me through.
And though you call my course unnatural,
You not your child well loving, yet I find
It greets me as an enterprise of kindness
Performed to your sole daughter.

CLEON
Heavens forgive it!

DIONYZA
And as for Pericles,
What should he say? We wept after her hearse,
And yet we mourn. Her monument
Is almost finished, and her epitaphs
In glittering golden characters express
A general praise to her, and care in us
At whose expense 'tis done.

CLEON
Thou art like the harpy,
Which, to betray, dost with thine angel's face
Seize with thine eagle's talons.

DIONYZA
You are like one that superstitiously
Doth swear to th' gods that winter kills the flies.
But yet I know you'll do as I advise.
Exeunt
Modern text
Act IV, Scene IV
Enter Gower

GOWER
Thus time we waste, and long leagues make short,
Sail seas in cockles, have and wish but for't,
Making to take your imagination
From bourn to bourn, region to region.
By you being pardoned, we commit no crime
To use one language in each several clime
Where our scene seems to live. I do beseech you
To learn of me, who stand i'th' gaps to teach you
The stages of our story. Pericles
Is now again thwarting the wayward seas,
Attended on by many a lord and knight.
To see his daughter, all his life's delight.
Old Helicanus goes along. Behind
Is left to govern it, you bear in mind,
Old Escanes, whom Helicanus late
Advanced in time to great and high estate.
Well-sailing ships and bounteous winds have brought
This king to Tarsus – think his pilot thought;
So with his steerage shall your thoughts grow on –
To fetch his daughter home, who first is gone.
Like motes and shadows see them move awhile;
Your ears unto your eyes I'll reconcile.
Dumb show:
Enter Pericles at one door with all his train, Cleon and
Dionyza at the other. Cleon shows Pericles the tomb,
whereat Pericles makes lamentation, puts on sackcloth,
and in a mighty passion departs. The rest go out
See how belief may suffer by foul show!
This borrowed passion stands for true old woe,
And Pericles, in sorrow all devoured,
With sighs shot through, and biggest tears o'ershowered,
Leaves Tarsus and again embarks. He swears
Never to wash his face, nor cut his hairs.
He puts on sackcloth, and to sea. He bears
A tempest which his mortal vessel tears,
And yet he rides it out. Now please you wit
The epitaph is for Marina writ
By wicked Dionyza.
The fairest, sweetest, and best lies here,
Who withered in her spring of year.
She was of Tyrus the King's daughter
On whom foul death hath made this slaughter.
Marina was she called, and at her birth,
Thetis being proud swallowed some part o'th' earth.
Therefore the earth, fearing to be o'erflowed,
Hath Thetis' birth-child on the heavens bestowed.
Wherefore she does, and swears she'll never stint,
Make raging battery upon shores of flint.
No visor does become black villainy
So well as soft and tender flattery.
Let Pericles believe his daughter's dead,
And bear his courses to be ordered
By Lady Fortune, while our scene must play
His daughter's woe and heavy well-a-day
In her unholy service. Patience then,
And think you now are all in Mytilene.
Exit
Modern text
Act IV, Scene V
Enter two Gentlemen

FIRST GENTLEMAN
Did you ever hear the like?

SECOND GENTLEMAN
No, nor never shall do in such a
place as this, she being once gone.

FIRST GENTLEMAN
But to have divinity preached there!
Did you ever dream of such a thing?

SECOND GENTLEMAN
No, no. Come, I am for no more
bawdy-houses. Shall's go hear the vestals sing?

FIRST GENTLEMAN
I'll do any thing now that is virtuous,
but I am out of the road of rutting for ever.
Exeunt
Modern text
Act IV, Scene VI
Enter the three Bawds

PANDAR
Well, I had rather than twice the worth of her
she had ne'er come here.

BAWD
Fie, fie upon her! She's able to freeze the god
Priapus and undo a whole generation. We must either
get her ravished or be rid of her. When she should
do for clients her fitment and do me the kindness of our
profession, she has me her quirks, her reasons, her
master reasons, her prayers, her knees, that she would
make a puritan of the devil if he should cheapen a kiss
of her.

BOULT
Faith, I must ravish her, or she'll disfurnish us
of all our cavalleria and make our swearers priests.

PANDAR
Now, the pox upon her green-sickness for me!

BAWD
Faith, there's no way to be rid on't but by the way
to the pox. Here comes the Lord Lysimachus disguised.

BOULT
We should have both lord and lown if the peevish
baggage would but give way to customers.
Enter Lysimachus

LYSIMACHUS
How now, how a dozen of virginities?

BAWD
Now, the gods to bless your honour!

BOULT
I am glad to see your honour in good health.

LYSIMACHUS
You may so; 'tis the better for you that
your resorters stand upon sound legs. How now, wholesome
iniquity have you, that a man may deal withal and
defy the surgeon?

BAWD
We have here one, sir, if she would – but there
never came her like in Mytilene.

LYSIMACHUS
If she'd do the deeds of darkness, thou
wouldst say.

BAWD
Your honour knows what 'tis to say well enough.

LYSIMACHUS
Well, call forth, call forth.

BOULT
For flesh and blood, sir, white and red, you shall
see a rose. And she were a rose indeed, if she had but –

LYSIMACHUS
What, prithee?

BOULT
O, sir, I can be modest.

LYSIMACHUS
That dignifies the renown of a bawd no
less than it gives a good report to a number to be chaste.
Exit Boult

BAWD
Here comes that which grows to the stalk, never
plucked yet, I can assure you.
Enter Boult with Marina
Is she not a fair creature?

LYSIMACHUS
Faith she would serve after a long voyage
at sea. Well, there's for you.
He gives her money
Leave us.

BAWD
I beseech your honour, give me leave a word, and
I'll have done presently.

LYSIMACHUS
I beseech you, do.

BAWD
(to Marina)
First, I would have you note this is an
honourable man.

MARINA
I desire to find him so, that I may worthily note
him.

BAWD
Next, he's the governor of this country, and a man
whom I am bound to.

MARINA
If he govern the country, you are bound to him
indeed, but how honourable he is in that I know not.

BAWD
Pray you, without any more virginal fencing, will
you use him kindly? He will line your apron with gold.

MARINA
What he will do graciously, I will thankfully
receive.

LYSIMACHUS
Ha' you done?

BAWD
My lord, she's not paced yet; you must take some
pains to work her to your manage. Come, we will leave
his honour and her together. Go thy ways.
Exeunt, Pandar, Bawd, and Boult

LYSIMACHUS
Now, pretty one, how long have you been
at this trade?

MARINA
What trade, sir?

LYSIMACHUS
Why, I cannot name it but I shall offend.

MARINA
I cannot be offended with my trade. Please you
to name it.

LYSIMACHUS
How long have you been of this profession?

MARINA
E'er since I can remember.

LYSIMACHUS
Did you go to't so young? Were you a
gamester at five, or at seven?

MARINA
Earlier too, sir, if now I be one.

LYSIMACHUS
Why, the house you dwell in proclaims you
to be a creature of sale.

MARINA
Do you know this house to be a place of such
resort, and will come into't? I hear say you're of
honourable parts and are the governor of this place.

LYSIMACHUS
Why, hath your principal made known
unto you who I am?

MARINA
Who is my principal?

LYSIMACHUS
Why, your herb-woman; she that sets
seeds and roots of shame and iniquity. O, you have
heard something of my power, and so stand aloof for
more serious wooing. But I protest to thee, pretty one,
my authority shall not see thee, or else look friendly
upon thee. Come, bring me to some private place.
Come, come.

MARINA
If you were born to honour, show it now;
If put upon you, make the judgement good
That thought you worthy of it.

LYSIMACHUS
How's this? How's this? Some more. Be sage.

MARINA
For me
That am a maid, though most ungentle fortune
Have placed me in this sty, where since I came
Diseases have been sold dearer than physic –
That the gods
Would set me free from this unhallowed place,
Though they did change me to the meanest bird
That flies i'th' purer air!

LYSIMACHUS
I did not think thou couldst have spoke so well,
Ne'er dreamt thou couldst.
Had I brought hither a corrupted mind,
Thy speech had altered it. Hold, here's gold for thee.
Persever in that clear way thou goest,
And the gods strengthen thee.

MARINA
The good gods preserve you.

LYSIMACHUS
For me, be you thoughten
That I came with no ill intent; for to me
The very doors and windows savour vilely.
Fare thee well. Thou art a piece of virtue, and
I doubt not but thy training hath been noble.
Hold, here's more gold for thee.
A curse upon him, die he like a thief,
That robs thee of thy goodness! If thou dost
Hear from me, it shall be for thy good.
Enter Boult

BOULT
I beseech your honour, one piece for me.

LYSIMACHUS
Avaunt, thou damned door-keeper!
Your house, but for this virgin that doth prop it,
Would sink and overwhelm you. Away!
Exit

BOULT
How's this? We must take another course with
you. If your peevish chastity, which is not worth a
breakfast in the cheapest country under the cope, shall
undo a whole household, let me be gelded like a spaniel.
Come your ways.

MARINA
Whither would you have me?

BOULT
I must have your maidenhead taken off, or the
common hangman shall execute it. Come your ways.
We'll have no more gentlemen driven away. Come your
ways, I say.
Enter Pandar and Bawd

BAWD
How now, what's the matter?

BOULT
Worse and worse, mistress. She has here spoken
holy words to the Lord Lysimachus.

BAWD
O, abominable!

BOULT
She makes our profession as it were to stink afore
the face of the gods.

BAWD
Marry, hang her up for ever!

BOULT
The nobleman would have dealt with her like a
nobleman, and she sent him away as cold as a snowball,
saying his prayers too.

BAWD
Boult, take her away. Use her at thy pleasure.
Crack the glass of her virginity, and make the rest
malleable.

BOULT
An if she were a thornier piece of ground than she
is, she shall be ploughed.

MARINA
Hark, hark, you gods!

BAWD
She conjures! Away with her! Would she had never
come within my doors! Marry, hang you! She's born to
undo us. Will you not go the way of womenkind?
Marry come up, my dish of chastity with rosemary and
bays!
Exit Pandar and Bawd

BOULT
Come, mistress, come your way with me.

MARINA
Whither wilt thou have me?

BOULT
To take from you the jewel you hold so dear.

MARINA
Prithee tell me one thing first.

BOULT
Come now, your one thing.

MARINA
What canst thou wish thine enemy to be?

BOULT
Why, I could wish him to be my master, or rather
my mistress.

MARINA
Neither of these are so bad as thou art,
Since they do better thee in their command.
Thou holdest a place
For which the pained'st fiend of hell
Would not in reputation change. Thou art
The damned doorkeeper to every custrel
That comes inquiring for his Tib.
To the choleric fisting of every rogue
Thy ear is liable. Thy food is such
As hath been belched on by infected lungs.

BOULT
What would you have me do? go to the wars,
would you? where a man may serve seven years for the
loss of a leg, and have not money enough in the end to
buy him a wooden one?

MARINA
Do anything but this
Thou doest. Empty old receptacles
Or common shores of filth;
Serve by indenture to the common hangman.
Any of these ways are yet better than this,
For what thou professest, a baboon, could he speak,
Would own a name too dear. That the gods
Would safely deliver me from this place!
Here, here's gold for thee.
If that thy master would gain by me,
Proclaim that I can sing, weave, sew, and dance,
With other virtues which I'll keep from boast,
And I will undertake all these to teach.
I doubt not but this populous city will
Yield many scholars.

BOULT
But can you teach all this you speak of?

MARINA
Prove that I cannot, take me home again
And prostitute me to the basest groom
That doth frequent your house.

BOULT
Well, I will see what I can do for thee. If I can
place thee, I will.

MARINA
But amongst honest women.

BOULT
Faith, my acquaintance lies little amongst them.
But since my master and mistress hath bought you,
there's no going but by their consent. Therefore I will
make them acquainted with your purpose, and I doubt
not but I shall find them tractable enough. Come, I'll
do for thee what I can. Come your ways.
Exeunt
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL