The Merry Wives of Windsor
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Enter Falstoffe, Mist. Ford, Mist. Page, Seruants, Ford, Page, Caius, Euans, Shallow.Enter Falstaff and Mistress Ford MW IV.ii.1
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Mi. Ford, Your sorrow hath eaten vp my Mistress Ford, your sorrow hath eaten up my MW IV.ii.1
sufferance; I see you are obsequious in your loue, and Isufferance. I see you are obsequious in your love, and Iobsequious (adj.)devoted, compliant, ready to pleaseMW IV.ii.2
sufferance (n.)distress, suffering, hardship
professe requitall to a haires bredth, not onely Mist. profess requital to a hair's breadth, not only, Mistressprofess (v.)
old form: professe
undertake, pledge
MW IV.ii.3
requital (n.)
old form: requitall
recompense, reward, repayment
hair / hair's breadth, to a
old form: haires bredth
in every little detail, in full, exactly
Ford, in the simple office of loue, but in all the accustrement,Ford, in the simple office of love, but in all the accoutrement,office (n.)task, service, duty, responsibilityMW IV.ii.4
accoutrement (n.)
old form: accustrement
formal embellishment, special trappings
complement, and ceremony of it: But are you surecomplement, and ceremony of it. But are you suresure (adj.)safe, secure, free from dangerMW IV.ii.5
compliment, complement (n.)
old form: complement
show, display, exhibition
of your husband now?of your husband now? MW IV.ii.6
Mis. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Hee's a birding (sweet Sir Iohn.)He's a-birding, sweet Sir John. MW IV.ii.7
Mis. Page. MISTRESS PAGE  
(within) MW IV.ii.8.1
What hoa, gossip Ford: what hoa.What ho, gossip Ford. What ho!gossip (n.)friend, neighbourMW IV.ii.8
Mis. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Step into th'chamber, Sir Iohn.Step into the chamber, Sir John. MW IV.ii.9
Exit Falstaff MW IV.ii.9
Enter Mistress Page MW IV.ii.10
Mis. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
How now (sweete heart) whose at homeHow now, sweetheart; who's at home MW IV.ii.10
besides your selfe?besides yourself? MW IV.ii.11
Mis Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why none but mine owne people.Why, none but mine own people.people (n.)household, servantsMW IV.ii.12
Mis. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Indeed?Indeed? MW IV.ii.13
Mis. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
No certainly: SpeakeNo, certainly. (Aside to her) Speak MW IV.ii.14
louder.louder. MW IV.ii.15
Mist. Pag. MISTRESS PAGE 
Truly, I am so glad you haue no bodyTruly, I am so glad you have nobody MW IV.ii.16
here.here. MW IV.ii.17
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why?Why? MW IV.ii.18
Mis. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Why woman, your husband is in hisWhy, woman, your husband is in his MW IV.ii.19
olde lines againe: he so takes on yonder with my husband, old lines again. He so takes on yonder with my husband,line (n.)conduct, way of behaving, course of actionMW IV.ii.20
so railes against all married mankinde; so curses all so rails against all married mankind, so curses allrail (v.)
old form: railes
rant, rave, be abusive [about]
MW IV.ii.21
Eues daughters, of what complexion soeuer; and soEve's daughters, of what complexion soever, and socomplexion (n.)appearance, look, colouringMW IV.ii.22
buffettes himselfe on the for-head: crying peere-out, peere-buffets himself on the forehead, crying ‘ Peer out, peerpeer out (v.)
old form: peere-out
peep out, show oneself
MW IV.ii.23
out, that any madnesse I euer yet beheld, seem'd butout!’, that any madness I ever yet beheld seemed but MW IV.ii.24
tamenesse, ciuility, and patience to this his distemper hetameness, civility, and patience to this his distemper hedistemper (n.)bad temper, cross moodMW IV.ii.25
civility (n.)
old form: ciuility
civilized conduct, courteous behaviour, good manners
is in now: I am glad the fat Knight is not heere.is in now. I am glad the fat knight is not here. MW IV.ii.26
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why, do's he talke of him?Why, does he talk of him? MW IV.ii.27
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Of none but him, and sweares he wasOf none but him, and swears he was MW IV.ii.28
caried out the last time hee search'd for him, in acarried out, the last time he searched for him, in a MW IV.ii.29
Basket: Protests to my husband he is now heere, & hathbasket; protests to my husband he is now here, and hath MW IV.ii.30
drawne him and the rest of their company from their drawn him and the rest of their company from their MW IV.ii.31
sport, to make another experiment of his suspition: Butsport, to make another experiment of his suspicion. Butexperiment (n.)investigation, inquiry, explorationMW IV.ii.32
sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainment
I am glad the Knight is not heere; now he shall see hisI am glad the knight is not here. Now he shall see his MW IV.ii.33
owne foolerie. own foolery. MW IV.ii.34
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
How neere is he Mistris Page?How near is he, Mistress Page? MW IV.ii.35
Mist. Pag. MISTRESS PAGE 
Hard by, at street end; he wil be hereHard by, at street end. He will be herehard (adv.)close, nearMW IV.ii.36
anon.anon.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyMW IV.ii.37
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I am vndone, the Knight is heere.I am undone. The knight is here.undone (adj.)
old form: vndone
ruined, destroyed, brought down
MW IV.ii.38
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Why then you are vtterly sham'd, &Why, then, you are utterly shamed, and MW IV.ii.39
hee's but a dead man. What a woman are you? Awayhe's but a dead man. What a woman are you! Awaydead (adj.)condemned to death, to be put to deathMW IV.ii.40
with him, away with him: Better shame, then murther.with him, away with him! Better shame than murder. MW IV.ii.41
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Which way should he go? How shouldWhich way should he go? How should MW IV.ii.42
I bestow him? Shall I put him into the basket againe?I bestow him? Shall I put him into the basket again?bestow (v.)stow away, dispose ofMW IV.ii.43
Enter Falstaff MW IV.ii.44
Fal. FALSTAFF 
No, Ile come no more i'th Basket: May I notNo, I'll come no more i'th' basket. May I not MW IV.ii.44
go out ere he come?go out ere he come? MW IV.ii.45
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Alas: three of Mr. Fords brothersAlas, three of Master Ford's brothers MW IV.ii.46
watch the doore with Pistols, that none shall issue out:watch the door with pistols, that none shall issue out. MW IV.ii.47
otherwise you might slip away ere hee came: But whatOtherwise you might slip away ere he came. But what MW IV.ii.48
make you heere?make you here?make (v.)do, have to doMW IV.ii.49
Fal. FALSTAFF 
What shall I do? Ile creepe vp into theWhat shall I do? I'll creep up into the MW IV.ii.50
chimney.chimney. MW IV.ii.51
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
There they alwaies vse to discharge theirThere they always use to discharge theiruse (v.)
old form: vse
be accustomed, make a habit [of]
MW IV.ii.52
Birding-peeces:birding pieces.piece (n.)cannon, piece of artillery, fire-armMW IV.ii.53
birding (n.)hunting small birds
MISTRESS PAGE 
creepe into the Kill-hole.Creep into the kiln-hole.kiln-hole (n.)
old form: Kill-hole
fire-hole of a kiln, oven
MW IV.ii.54
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Where is it?Where is it? MW IV.ii.55
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
He will seeke there on my word: NeytherHe will seek there, on my word. Neither MW IV.ii.56
Presse, Coffer, Chest, Trunke, Well, Vault, but he hath anpress, coffer, chest, trunk, well, vault, but he hath anpress (n.)
old form: Presse
clothes-press, cupboard, wardrobe
MW IV.ii.57
abstract for the remembrance of such places, and goesabstract for the remembrance of such places, and goesremembrance (n.)memory, bringing to mind, recollectionMW IV.ii.58
abstract (n.)list, register, inventory
to them by his Note: There is no hiding you in theto them by his note. There is no hiding you in the MW IV.ii.59
house.house. MW IV.ii.60
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Ile go out then.I'll go out, then. MW IV.ii.61
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS PAGE 
If you goe out in your owne semblance,If you go out in your own semblance,semblance (n.)appearance, outward showMW IV.ii.62
you die Sir Iohn, vnlesse you go out disguis'd.you die, Sir John. Unless you go out disguised – MW IV.ii.63
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
How might we disguise him?How might we disguise him? MW IV.ii.64
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Alas the day I know not, there is noAlas the day, I know not. There is no MW IV.ii.65
womans gowne bigge enough for him: otherwise he mightwoman's gown big enough for him. Otherwise he might MW IV.ii.66
put on a hat, a muffler, and a kerchiefe, and so escape.put on a hat, a muffler, and a kerchief, and so escape.kerchief (n.)
old form: kerchiefe
cloth head-covering, scarf
MW IV.ii.67
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Good hearts, deuise something: any extremitie,Good hearts, devise something. Any extremityextremity (n.)
old form: extremitie
ridiculous behaviour, embarrassing conduct
MW IV.ii.68
rather then a mischiefe.rather than a mischief.mischief (n.)
old form: mischiefe
catastrophe, calamity, misfortune
MW IV.ii.69
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
My Maids Aunt the fat woman of My maid's aunt, the fat woman of MW IV.ii.70
Brainford, has a gowne aboue.Brainford, has a gown above.Brainford (n.)Brentford, not far from Kew Gardens, LondonMW IV.ii.71
above (adv.)
old form: aboue
upstairs; [in stage directions] in the gallery or upper stage
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
On my word it will serue him: shee's asOn my word, it will serve him. She's asserve (v.)
old form: serue
suffice, be enough, do [for]
MW IV.ii.72
big as he is: and there's her thrum'd hat, and herbig as he is; and there's her thrummed hat and herthrummed (adj.)
old form: thrum'd
fringed with loose threads
MW IV.ii.73
muffler too: run vp Sir Iohn.muffler too. Run up, Sir John. MW IV.ii.74
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Go, go, sweet Sir Iohn: Mistris Page Go, go, sweet Sir John. Mistress Page MW IV.ii.75
and I will looke some linnen for your head.and I will look some linen for your head.look (v.)
old form: looke
find, seek, look for
MW IV.ii.76
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Quicke, quicke, wee'le come dresse youQuick, quick! We'll come dress you MW IV.ii.77
straight: put on the gowne the while.straight. Put on the gown the while.straight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at onceMW IV.ii.78
Exit Falstaff MW IV.ii.78
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I would my husband would meete himI would my husband would meet him MW IV.ii.79
in this shape: he cannot abide the old woman ofin this shape. He cannot abide the old woman of MW IV.ii.80
Brainford; he sweares she's a witch, forbad her myBrainford. He swears she's a witch, forbade her my MW IV.ii.81
house, and hath threatned to beate her.house, and hath threatened to beat her. MW IV.ii.82
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Heauen guide him to thy husbandsHeaven guide him to thy husband's MW IV.ii.83
cudgell: and the diuell guide his cudgell afterwards.cudgel, and the devil guide his cudgel afterwards! MW IV.ii.84
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
But is my husband comming?But is my husband coming? MW IV.ii.85
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
I in good sadnesse is he, and talkes ofAy, in good sadness, is he, and talks ofsadness, in / in good
old form: sadnesse
in earnest, seriously
MW IV.ii.86
the basket too, howsoeuer he hath had intelligence.the basket too, howsoever he hath had intelligence. MW IV.ii.87
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Wee'l try that: for Ile appoint my menWe'll try that; for I'll appoint my mentry (v.)put to the test, test the goodness [of]MW IV.ii.88
appoint (v.)direct, order, instruct
to carry the basket againe, to meete him at the doore withto carry the basket again, to meet him at the door with MW IV.ii.89
it, as they did last time.it, as they did last time. MW IV.ii.90
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Nay, but hee'l be heere presently: let'sNay, but he'll be here presently. Let'spresently (adv.)after a short time, soon, before longMW IV.ii.91
go dresse him like the witch of Brainford.go dress him like the witch of Brainford. MW IV.ii.92
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Ile first direct my men, what they shallI'll first direct my men what they shall MW IV.ii.93
doe with the basket: Goe vp, Ile bring linnen for him do with the basket. Go up. I'll bring linen for him MW IV.ii.94
straight.straight.straight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at onceMW IV.ii.95
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Hang him dishonest Varlet, / We cannotHang him, dishonest varlet! We cannotvarlet (n.)knave, rogue, rascal, ruffianMW IV.ii.96
dishonest (adj.)indecent, unchaste, immodest, lewd
misuse enough:misuse him enough.misuse (v.)disgrace, deride, abuseMW IV.ii.97
We'll leaue a proofe by that which we will doo,We'll leave a proof, by that which we will do, MW IV.ii.98
Wiues may be merry, and yet honest too:Wives may be merry, and yet honest too.honest (adj.)chaste, pure, virtuousMW IV.ii.99
We do not acte that often, iest, and laugh,We do not act that often jest and laugh;act (v.)
old form: acte
commit adultery, be promiscuous
MW IV.ii.100
'Tis old, but true, Still Swine eats all the draugh.'Tis old but true: 'Still swine eats all the draff.'still (adj.)quiet, calm, subduedMW IV.ii.101
draff (n.)
old form: draugh
pig-swill, refuse, garbage
Exit MW IV.ii.101
Enter John and Robert MW IV.ii.102
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Go Sirs, take the basket againe on yourGo, sirs, take the basket again on your MW IV.ii.102
shoulders: your Master is hard at doore: if hee bid youshoulders. Your master is hard at door. If he bid youhard (adv.)close, nearMW IV.ii.103
set it downe, obey him: quickly, dispatch.set it down, obey him. Quickly, dispatch.dispatch, despatch (v.)deal with promptly, settle, get [something] done quicklyMW IV.ii.104
Exit MW IV.ii.104
1 Ser. JOHN 
Come, come, take it vp.Come, come, take it up. MW IV.ii.105
2 Ser. ROBERT 
Pray heauen it be not full of Knight againe.Pray heaven it be not full of knight again. MW IV.ii.106
1 Ser. JOHN 
I hope not, I had liefe as beare so much lead.I hope not. I had as lief bear so much lead.lief, had as
old form: liefe
should like just as much
MW IV.ii.107
Enter Ford, Page, Shallow, Caius, and Evans MW IV.ii.108
Ford. FORD 
I, but if it proue true (Mr. Page) haue you anyAy, but if it prove true, Master Page, have you any MW IV.ii.108
way then to vnfoole me againe. Set downe the basketway then to unfool me again? Set down the basket,unfool (v.)
old form: vnfoole
make less of a fool, remove the name of fool from
MW IV.ii.109
villaine: some body call my wife: Youth in a basket: Ohvillains. Somebody call my wife. Youth in a basket! O MW IV.ii.110
you Panderly Rascals, there's a knot: a gin, a packe, ayou panderly rascals! There's a knot, a ging, a pack, apanderly (adj.)pimping, procuring, go-betweenMW IV.ii.111
pack (n.)
old form: packe
gang, group, circle, confederacy
knot (n.)company, band, assembly
gin (n.)snare, trap
ging (n.)gang, company, whole household
conspiracie against me: Now shall the diuel be sham'd.conspiracy against me. Now shall the devil be shamed. MW IV.ii.112
What wife I say: Come, come forth: behold whatWhat, wife, I say! Come, come forth! Behold what MW IV.ii.113
honest cloathes you send forth to bleaching.honest clothes you send forth to bleaching! MW IV.ii.114
Page. PAGE 
Why, this passes M. Ford: you are not to goeWhy, this passes, Master Ford. You are not to gopass (v.)surpass, go beyond, outdoMW IV.ii.115
loose any longer, you must be pinnion'd.loose any longer. You must be pinioned.pinioned (adj.)
old form: pinnion'd
bound, tied up, secured
MW IV.ii.116
Euans. EVANS 
Why, this is Lunaticks: this is madde, as a mad dogge.Why, this is lunatics. This is mad as a mad dog. MW IV.ii.117
Shall. SHALLOW 
Indeed M. Ford, thi is not well indeed.Indeed, Master Ford, this is not well, indeed. MW IV.ii.118
Ford. FORD 
So say I too Sir,So say I too, sir. MW IV.ii.119
Enter Mistress Ford MW IV.ii.120
come hither Mistris Ford, Mistris Ford, the honest Come hither, Mistress Ford. Mistress Ford, the honest MW IV.ii.120
woman, the modest wife, the vertuous creature, thatwoman, the modest wife, the virtuous creature, that MW IV.ii.121
hath the iealious foole to her husband: I suspect withouthath the jealous fool to her husband! I suspect without MW IV.ii.122
cause (Mistris) do I?cause, mistress, do I? MW IV.ii.123
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Heauen be my witnesse you doe, if youHeaven be my witness, you do, if you MW IV.ii.124
suspect me in any dishonesty.suspect me in any dishonesty.dishonesty (n.)unchasteness, lewdness, immoralityMW IV.ii.125
Ford. FORD 
Well said Brazon-face, hold it out: Come forthWell said, brazen-face. Hold it out. – Come forth,hold it outkeep it upMW IV.ii.126
sirrah.sirrah! MW IV.ii.127
He pulls clothes out of the basket MW IV.ii.128
Page. PAGE 
This passes.This passes! MW IV.ii.128
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Are you not asham'd, let the clothsAre you not ashamed? Let the clothes MW IV.ii.129
alone.alone. MW IV.ii.130
Ford. FORD 
I shall finde you anon.I shall find you anon.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyMW IV.ii.131
Eua. EVANS 
'Tis vnreasonable; will you take vp your wiues'Tis unreasonable. Will you take up your wife's MW IV.ii.132
cloathes? Come, away.clothes? Come away. MW IV.ii.133
Ford. FORD 
Empty the basket I say.Empty the basket, I say. MW IV.ii.134
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why man, why?Why, man, why? MW IV.ii.135
Ford. FORD 
Master Page, as I am a man, there was one conuay'dMaster Page, as I am a man, there was one conveyed MW IV.ii.136
out of my house yesterday in this basket: whyout of my house yesterday in this basket. Why MW IV.ii.137
may not he be there againe, in my house I am sure he is:may not he be there again? In my house I am sure he is. MW IV.ii.138
my Intelligence is true, my iealousie is reasonable,My intelligence is true. My jealousy is reasonable.intelligence (n.)information, news, communicationMW IV.ii.139
pluck me out all the linnen.Pluck me out all the linen. MW IV.ii.140
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
If you find a man there, he shall dye aIf you find a man there, he shall die a MW IV.ii.141
Fleas death.flea's death. MW IV.ii.142
Page. PAGE 
Heer's no man.Here's no man. MW IV.ii.143
Shal. SHALLOW 
By my fidelity this is not well Mr. Ford: By my fidelity, this is not well, Master Ford.fidelity, by myupon my word of honour, in truthMW IV.ii.144
This wrongs you.This wrongs you.wrong (v.)discredit, dishonour, injure, disgraceMW IV.ii.145
Euans. EVANS 
Mr Ford, you must pray, and not follow theMaster Ford, you must pray, and not follow the MW IV.ii.146
imaginations of your owne heart: this is iealousies.imaginations of your own heart. This is jealousies. MW IV.ii.147
Ford. FORD 
Well, hee's not heere I seeke for.Well, he's not here I seek for. MW IV.ii.148
Page. PAGE 
No, nor no where else but in your braine.No, nor nowhere else but in your brain. MW IV.ii.149
Ford. FORD 
Helpe to search my house this one time: if I findHelp to search my house this one time. If I find MW IV.ii.150
not what I seeke, shew no colour for my extremity: Letnot what I seek, show no colour for my extremity. Letextremity (n.)ridiculous behaviour, embarrassing conductMW IV.ii.151
colour (n.)good ground, convincing reason, excuse
me for euer be your Table-sport: Let them say of me, asme for ever be your table sport. Let them say of me, 'Astable (n.)dinner table, dinner partyMW IV.ii.152
sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainment
iealous as Ford, that search'd a hollow Wall-nut for hisjealous as Ford, that searched a hollow walnut for his MW IV.ii.153
wiues Lemman. Satisfie me once more, once more serchwife's leman.' Satisfy me once more. Once more searchleman (n.)
old form: Lemman
lover, paramour, sweetheart
MW IV.ii.154
with me.with me. MW IV.ii.155
Exeunt John and Robert with the basket MW IV.ii.155
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What hoa (Mistris Page,) come you andWhat ho, Mistress Page, come you and MW IV.ii.156
the old woman downe: my husband will come into thethe old woman down. My husband will come into the MW IV.ii.157
Chamber.chamber. MW IV.ii.158
Ford. FORD 
Old woman? what old womans that?Old woman? What old woman's that? MW IV.ii.159
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why it is my maids Aunt of Brainford.Why, it is my maid's aunt of Brainford. MW IV.ii.160
Ford. FORD 
A witch, a Queane, an olde couzening queane: Haue I notA witch, a quean, an old cozening quean! Have I notquean (n.)
old form: Queane
bawd, jade, hussy
MW IV.ii.161
cozening (adj.)
old form: couzening
cheating, deceiving, fraudulent
forbid her my house. She comes of errands do's she?forbid her my house? She comes of errands, does she? MW IV.ii.162
We are simple men, wee doe not know what's brought toWe are simple men; we do not know what's brought to MW IV.ii.163
passe vnder the profession of Fortune-telling. She workespass under the profession of fortune-telling. She works MW IV.ii.164
by Charmes, by Spels, by th'Figure, & such dawbry asby charms, by spells, by th' figure; and such daubery asfigure (n.)astrological diagram, horoscopeMW IV.ii.165
daubery, daubry (n.)
old form: dawbry
trickery, pretence, deceitful show
this is, beyond our Element: wee know nothing. Comethis is beyond our element – we know nothing. Comeelement (n.)sphere of knowledge, proper comprehensionMW IV.ii.166
downe you Witch, you Hagge you, come downe I say.down, you witch, you hag, you. Come down, I say! MW IV.ii.167
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Nay, good sweet husband, goodNay, good sweet husband! – Good MW IV.ii.168
Gentlemen, let him strike the old woman.gentlemen, let him not strike the old woman. MW IV.ii.169
Enter Falstaff in woman's clothes, and Mistress MW IV.ii.170.1
Page MW IV.ii.170.2
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Come mother Prat, Come giue me yourCome, Mother Prat, come, give me your MW IV.ii.170
hand.hand. MW IV.ii.171
Ford. FORD 
Ile Prat-her:I'll prat her. MW IV.ii.172
He beats Falstaff MW IV.ii.173.1
Out of my doore, you Witch, you Ragge, you Baggage, youOut of my door, you witch, you rag, you baggage, yourag (n.)
old form: Ragge
worthless wretch, good-for-nothing creature, beggar
MW IV.ii.173
Poulcat, you Runnion, out, out: Ile coniure you, Ilepolecat, you ronyon! Out, out! I'll conjure you, I'llpolecat (n.)
old form: Poulcat
[slang] prostitute, courtesan, whore
MW IV.ii.174
ronyon (n.)
old form: Runnion
[term of abuse for a woman] mangy creature
conjure (v.)
old form: coniure
put a spell on, charm, bewitch
fortune-tell you.fortune-tell you. MW IV.ii.175
Exit Falstaff MW IV.ii.175
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Are you not asham'd? I thinke you haueAre you not ashamed? I think you have MW IV.ii.176
kill'd the poore woman.killed the poor woman. MW IV.ii.177
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Nay he will do it, 'tis a goodly crediteNay, he will do it. – 'Tis a goodly credit MW IV.ii.178
for you.for you. MW IV.ii.179
Ford. FORD 
Hang her witch.Hang her, witch! MW IV.ii.180
Eua. EVANS 
By yea, and no, I thinke the o'man is a witch indeede:By yea and no, I think the 'oman is a witch indeed.yea and no, byby yes and no [emphatic assertion, replacing a real oath]MW IV.ii.181
I like not when a o'man has a great peard; I spie a greatI like not when a 'oman has a great peard. I spy a great MW IV.ii.182
peard vnder his muffler.peard under his muffler. MW IV.ii.183
Ford. FORD 
Will you follow Gentlemen, I beseech you follow: Will you follow, gentlemen? I beseech you, follow. MW IV.ii.184
see but the issue of my iealousie: If I cry out thus vponSee but the issue of my jealousy. If I cry out thus uponissue (n.)outcome, result, consequence(s)MW IV.ii.185
cry out (v.)[hunting] call like a hound
no traile, neuer trust me when I open againe.no trail, never trust me when I open again.open (v.)[hunting] bark at finding a scentMW IV.ii.186
trail (n.)
old form: traile
[hunting] scent, track
Page. PAGE 
Let's obey his humour a little further: ComeLet's obey his humour a little further. Come,humour (n.)fancy, whim, inclination, capriceMW IV.ii.187
Gentlemen.gentlemen. MW IV.ii.188
Exeunt Ford, Page, Shallow, Caius, and Evans MW IV.ii.188
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Trust me he beate him most pittifully.Trust me, he beat him most pitifully.trust mebelieve meMW IV.ii.189
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Nay by th'Masse that he did not: heNay, by th'mass, that he did not. He MW IV.ii.190
beate him most vnpittifully, me thought.beat him most unpitifully, methought.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: me thought
it seems / seemed to me
MW IV.ii.191
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Ile haue the cudgell hallow'd, and hungI'll have the cudgel hallowed and hung MW IV.ii.192
ore the Altar, it hath done meritorious seruice.o'er the altar. It hath done meritorious service. MW IV.ii.193
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What thinke you? May we with the warrant ofWhat think you? May we, with the MW IV.ii.194
woman-hood, and the witnesse of a goodwarrant of womanhood and the witness of a goodwarrant (n.)licence, sanction, authorizationMW IV.ii.195
conscience, pursue him with any further reuenge?conscience, pursue him with any further revenge? MW IV.ii.196
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
The spirit of wantonnesse is sure scar'dThe spirit of wantonness is sure scaredwantonness (n.)
old form: wantonnesse
lust, lasciviousness, promiscuity
MW IV.ii.197
out of him, if the diuell haue him not in fee-simple, without of him. If the devil have him not in fee simple, withfee simple, in
old form: fee-simple
in complete possession
MW IV.ii.198
fine and recouery, he will neuer (I thinke) in the way offine and recovery, he will never, I think, in the way ofrecovery (n.)
old form: recouery
[legal] procedure for transferring property into full ownership
MW IV.ii.199
fine (n.)[legal] agreement to transfer land possession
waste, attempt vs againe.waste, attempt us again.waste (n.)[legal] damage to property by a tenantMW IV.ii.200
attempt (v.)tempt, persuade, win over
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Shall we tell our husbands how wee haueShall we tell our husbands how we have MW IV.ii.201
seru'd him?served him? MW IV.ii.202
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Yes, by all meanes: if it be but to scrapeYes, by all means, if it be but to scrape MW IV.ii.203
the figures out of your husbands braines: if they can the figures out of your husband's brains. If they canfigure (n.)fancy, imagining, phantasmMW IV.ii.204
find in their hearts, the poore vnuertuous fat Knight shallfind in their hearts the poor unvirtuous fat knight shall MW IV.ii.205
be any further afflicted, wee two will still bee the ministers. be any further afflicted, we two will still be the ministers.minister (n.)messenger, agent, servantMW IV.ii.206
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Ile warrant, they'l haue him publiquelyI'll warrant they'll have him publiclywarrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmMW IV.ii.207
sham'd, and me thinkes there would be no period to theshamed, and methinks there would be no period to themethinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: me thinkes
it seems / seemed to me
MW IV.ii.208
period (n.)point of completion, fitting conclusion, consummation
iest, should he not be publikely sham'd.jest, should he not be publicly shamed. MW IV.ii.209
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Come, to the Forge with it, then Come, to the forge with it, then. Shape MW IV.ii.210
shape it: I would not haue things coole. it. I would not have things cool. MW IV.ii.211
ExeuntExeunt MW IV.ii.211
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