Coriolanus
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Musicke playes. Enter a Seruingman.Music plays. Enter a Servingman Cor IV.v.1
1 Ser. FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Wine, Wine, Wine: What seruice isWine, wine, wine! What service is Cor IV.v.1
heere? I thinke our Fellowes are asleepe.here? I think our fellows are asleep.fellow (n.)
old form: Fellowes
fellow-servant, colleague
Cor IV.v.2
Exit Cor IV.v.2
Enter another Seruingman.Enter another Servingman Cor IV.v.3
2 Ser. SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Where's Cotus: my M. calsWhere's Cotus? My master calls Cor IV.v.3
for him: Cotus. for him. Cotus! Cor IV.v.4
Exit Exit Cor IV.v.4
Enter Coriolanus.Enter Coriolanus Cor IV.v.5
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
A goodly House: / The Feast smels well: but IA goodly house. The feast smells well, but I Cor IV.v.5
appeare not like a Guest.Appear not like a guest. Cor IV.v.6
Enter the first Seruingman.Enter the First Servingman Cor IV.v.7
1 Ser. FIRST SERVINGMAN 
What would you haue Friend?What would you have, friend? Cor IV.v.7
whence are you? Here's no place for you: Pray go to the Whence are you? Here's no place for you. Pray go to the Cor IV.v.8
doore?door Cor IV.v.9
Exit Exit Cor IV.v.9
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
I haue deseru'd no better entertainment,I have deserved no better entertainmententertainment (n.)treatment, attitude, dispositionCor IV.v.10
in being Coriolanus.In being Coriolanus. Cor IV.v.11
Enter second Seruant.Enter Second Servingman Cor IV.v.12
2 Ser. SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Whence are you sir? Ha's theWhence are you, sir? Has the Cor IV.v.12
Porter his eyes in his head, that he giues entrance to suchporter his eyes in his head that he gives entrance to such Cor IV.v.13
Companions? / Pray get you out.companions? Pray, get you out.companion (n.)rogue, rascal, fellowCor IV.v.14
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Away.Away! Cor IV.v.15
2 Ser. SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Away? Get you away.Away? Get you away. Cor IV.v.16
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Now th'art troublesome.Now th'art troublesome. Cor IV.v.17
2 Ser. SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Are you so braue: Ile haue youAre you so brave? I'll have youbrave (adj.)
old form: braue
defiant, insolent, impudent
Cor IV.v.18
talkt with anontalked with anon.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyCor IV.v.19
Enter 3 Seruingman, the 1 meets him.Enter Third Servingman. The First meets him Cor IV.v.20
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
What Fellowes this?What fellow's this? Cor IV.v.20
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
A strange one as euer I look'd on:A strange one as ever I looked on. Cor IV.v.21
I cannot get him out o'th' house: Prythee call my MasterI cannot get him out o'th' house. Prithee, call my master Cor IV.v.22
to him.to him. Cor IV.v.23
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
What haue you to do here fellow?What have you to do here, fellow? Cor IV.v.24
Pray you auoid the house.Pray you avoid the house.avoid (v.)
old form: auoid
leave, quit, clear out [of]
Cor IV.v.25
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Let me but stand, I will not hurt your Harth.Let me but stand – I will not hurt your hearth.stand (v.)continue, remain, wait, stay putCor IV.v.26
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
What are you?What are you? Cor IV.v.27
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
A Gentleman.A gentleman. Cor IV.v.28
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
A maru'llous poore one.A marvellous poor one.marvellous (adv.)
old form: maru'llous
very, extremely, exceedingly
Cor IV.v.29
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
True, so I am.True, so I am. Cor IV.v.30
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Pray you poore Gentleman, take vp Pray you, poor gentleman, take up Cor IV.v.31
some other station: Heere's no place for you, pray yousome other station. Here's no place for you. Pray youstation (n.)place to stand in, spot to see fromCor IV.v.32
auoid: Come.avoid. Come.avoid (v.)
old form: auoid
leave, quit, clear out [of]
Cor IV.v.33
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Follow your Function, go, and batten onFollow your function, go and batten onfunction (n.)office, occupation, callingCor IV.v.34
batten (v.)glut oneself, grow fat on
colde bits.cold bits. Cor IV.v.35
Pushes him away from him.He pushes him away from him Cor IV.v.36
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
What you will not? Prythee tellWhat, you will not? Prithee tell Cor IV.v.36
my Maister what a strange Guest he ha's heere.my master what a strange guest he has here. Cor IV.v.37
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
And I shall.And I shall. Cor IV.v.38
Exit second Seruingman. Exit Second Servingman Cor IV.v.38
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Where dwel'st thou?Where dwell'st thou? Cor IV.v.39
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Vnder the Canopy.Under the canopy.canopy (n.)sky, firmamentCor IV.v.40
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Vnder the Canopy?Under the canopy? Cor IV.v.41
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Ay. Cor IV.v.42
I.THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Where's that?Where's that? Cor IV.v.43
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
I'th City of Kites and Crowes.I'th' city of kites and crows. Cor IV.v.44
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
I'th City of Kites and Crowes? WhatI'th' city of kites and crows? What Cor IV.v.45
an Asse it is, then thou dwel'st with Dawes too?an ass it is! Then thou dwell'st with daws too?daw (n.)
old form: Dawes
jackdaw [as noted for its stupidity]; dolt, fool
Cor IV.v.46
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
No, I serue not thy Master.No, I serve not thy master. Cor IV.v.47
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
How sir? Do you meddle with myHow, sir? Do you meddle with my Cor IV.v.48
Master?master? Cor IV.v.49
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
I, tis an honester seruice, then to meddleAy, 'tis an honester service than to meddle Cor IV.v.50
with thy Mistris: Thou prat'st, and prat'st, serue withwith thy mistress. Thou prat'st and prat'st. Serve with Cor IV.v.51
thy trencher: Hence. thy trencher, Hence!trencher (n.)plate, platter, serving dishCor IV.v.52
Beats him awayHe beats him away from the stage Cor IV.v.53.1
Enter Auffidius with the Seruingman.Enter Aufidius with the Second Servingman Cor IV.v.53.2
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
Where is this Fellow?Where is this fellow? Cor IV.v.53
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Here sir, I'de haue beaten himHere, sir. I'd have beaten him Cor IV.v.54
like a dogge, but for disturbing the Lords within.like a dog, but for disturbing the lords within. Cor IV.v.55
Servingmen stand aside Cor IV.v.56
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
Whence com'st thou? What wouldst yu? Thy name?Whence com'st thou? What wouldst thou? Thy name? Cor IV.v.56
Why speak'st not? Speake man: What's thy name?Why speak'st not? Speak, man. What's thy name? Cor IV.v.57.1
Corio. CORIOLANUS  
(unmuffling) Cor IV.v.57
If Tullus If, Tullus, Cor IV.v.57.2
not yet thou know'st me, and seeing me, dost notNot yet thou know'st me, and, seeing me, dost not Cor IV.v.58
thinke me for the man I am, necessitieThink me for the man I am, necessity Cor IV.v.59
commands me name my selfe.Commands me name myself. Cor IV.v.60.1
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
What is thy name?What is thy name? Cor IV.v.60.2
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
A name vnmusicall to the Volcians eares,A name unmusical to the Volscians' ears, Cor IV.v.61
And harsh in sound to thine.And harsh in sound to thine. Cor IV.v.62.1
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
Say, what's thy name?Say, what's thy name? Cor IV.v.62.2
Thou hast a Grim apparance, and thy FaceThou hast a grim appearance, and thy face Cor IV.v.63
Beares a Command in't: Though thy Tackles torne,Bears a command in't. Though thy tackle's torn,tackle (n.)[of a ship] rigging and sailsCor IV.v.64
Thou shew'st a Noble Vessell: What's thy name?Thou show'st a noble vessel. What's thy name? Cor IV.v.65
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
Prepare thy brow to frowne: knowst yu me yet?Prepare thy brow to frown. Know'st thou me yet?brow (n.)eyebrowCor IV.v.66
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
I know thee not? Thy Name?I know thee not. Thy name? Cor IV.v.67
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
My name is Caius Martius, who hath doneMy name is Caius Martius, who hath done Cor IV.v.68
To thee particularly, and to all the VolcesTo thee particularly and to all the Volscesparticularly (adv.)in person, individuallyCor IV.v.69
Great hurt and Mischiefe: thereto witnesse mayGreat hurt and mischief; thereto witness may Cor IV.v.70
My Surname Coriolanus. The painfull Seruice,My surname, Coriolanus. The painful service,painful (adj.)
old form: painfull
painstaking, diligent, laborious
Cor IV.v.71
The extreme Dangers, and the droppes of BloodThe extreme dangers, and the drops of blood Cor IV.v.72
Shed for my thanklesse Country, are requitted:Shed for my thankless country, are requitedrequite (v.), past forms requit, requited
old form: requitted
reward, repay, recompense
Cor IV.v.73
But with that Surname, a good memorieBut with that surname – a good memory,memory (n.)
old form: memorie
memorial, remembrance
Cor IV.v.74
And witnesse of the Malice and DispleasureAnd witness of the malice and displeasure Cor IV.v.75
Which thou should'st beare me, only that name remains.Which thou shouldst bear me. Only that name remains. Cor IV.v.76
The Cruelty and Enuy of the people,The cruelty and envy of the people,envy (n.)
old form: Enuy
malice, ill-will, enmity
Cor IV.v.77
Permitted by our dastard Nobles, whoPermitted by our dastard nobles, whodastard (adj.)dastardly, cowardly, despicableCor IV.v.78
Haue all forsooke me, hath deuour'd the rest:Have all forsook me, hath devoured the rest, Cor IV.v.79
And suffer'd me by th' voyce of Slaues to beAnd suffered me by th' voice of slaves to bevoice (n.)
old form: voyce
vote, official support
Cor IV.v.80
Hoop'd out of Rome. Now this extremity,Whooped out of Rome. Now this extremitywhoop, hoop (v.)
old form: Hoop'd
howl, hoot, jeer
Cor IV.v.81
Hath brought me to thy Harth, not out of HopeHath brought me to thy hearth, not out of hope –  Cor IV.v.82
(Mistake me not) to saue my life: for ifMistake me not – to save my life; for if Cor IV.v.83
I had fear'd death, of all the Men i'th' WorldI had feared death, of all the men i'th' world Cor IV.v.84
I would haue voided thee. But in meere spightI would have 'voided thee; but in mere spite,mere (adj.)
old form: meere
complete, total, absolute, utter
Cor IV.v.85
To be full quit of those my Banishers,To be full quit of those my banishers,quit (v.)pay back, repay, rewardCor IV.v.86
Stand I before thee heere: Then if thou hastStand I before thee here. Then if thou hast Cor IV.v.87
A heart of wreake in thee, that wilt reuengeA heart of wreak in thee, that wilt revengewreak (n.)
old form: wreake
revenge, vengeance, retribution
Cor IV.v.88
Thine owne particular wrongs, and stop those maimesThine own particular wrongs and stop those maimsmaim (n.)
old form: maimes
wound, injury, mutilation
Cor IV.v.89
stop (v.)stop up, close (up), shut
Of shame seene through thy Country, speed thee straightOf shame seen through thy country, speed thee straightstraight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at onceCor IV.v.90
through (prep.)throughout
And make my misery serue thy turne: So vse it,And make my misery serve thy turn. So use it Cor IV.v.91
That my reuengefull Seruices may proueThat my revengeful services may prove Cor IV.v.92
As Benefits to thee. For I will fightAs benefits to thee. For I will fight Cor IV.v.93
Against my Cankred Countrey, with the SpleeneAgainst my cankered country with the spleenspleen (n.)
old form: Spleene
temper, spirit, passion [part of the body seen as the source of both gloomy and mirthful emotions]
Cor IV.v.94
cankered (adj.)
old form: Cankred
corrupted, rotten to the core
Of all the vnder Fiends. But if so be,Of all the under fiends. But if so beunder fiend (n.)
old form: vnder
devil from hell, fiend from under the earth
Cor IV.v.95
Thou dar'st not this, and that to proue more FortunesThou dar'st not this, and that to prove more fortunesprove (v.)
old form: proue
test, try out, make trial [of]
Cor IV.v.96
Th'art tyr'd, then in a word, I also amTh'art tired, then, in a word, I also am Cor IV.v.97
Longer to liue most wearie: and presentLonger to live most weary, and present Cor IV.v.98
My throat to thee, and to thy Ancient Malice:My throat to thee and to thy ancient malice; Cor IV.v.99
Which not to cut, would shew thee but a Foole,Which not to cut would show thee but a fool, Cor IV.v.100
Since I haue euer followed thee with hate,Since I have ever followed thee with hate, Cor IV.v.101
Drawne Tunnes of Blood out of thy Countries brest,Drawn tuns of blood out of thy country's breast,tun (n.)
old form: Tunnes
barrel, large cask
Cor IV.v.102
And cannot liue but to thy shame, vnlesseAnd cannot live but to thy shame, unless Cor IV.v.103
It be to do thee seruice.It be to do thee service. Cor IV.v.104.1
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
Oh Martius, Martius;O Martius, Martius! Cor IV.v.104.2
Each word thou hast spoke, hath weeded from my heartEach word thou hast spoke hath weeded from my heart Cor IV.v.105
A roote of Ancient Enuy. If IupiterA root of ancient envy. If Jupiterenvy (n.)
old form: Enuy
malice, ill-will, enmity
Cor IV.v.106
Jupiter, Jove (n.)Roman supreme god; associated with the heavens and the weather, especially thunder and lightning; husband of Juno
ancient, aunchient (adj.)long-established, long-standing
Should from yond clowd speake diuine things,Should from yond cloud speak divine things, Cor IV.v.107
And say 'tis true; I'de not beleeue them moreAnd say ‘ 'Tis true,’ I'd not believe them more Cor IV.v.108
Then thee all-Noble Martius. Let me twineThan thee, all-noble Martius. Let me twine Cor IV.v.109
Mine armes about that body, where againstMine arms about that body, whereagainst Cor IV.v.110
My grained Ash an hundred times hath broke,My grained ash an hundred times hath brokegrained (adj.)straight-grained, tough, strongCor IV.v.111
ash (n.)spear, lance [made of ash]
And scarr'd the Moone with splinters: heere I cleepAnd scarred the moon with splinters. Here I clipclip (v.)
old form: cleep
embrace, clasp, hug
Cor IV.v.112
The Anuile of my Sword, and do contestThe anvil of my sword, and do contest Cor IV.v.113
As hotly, and as Nobly with thy Loue,As hotly and as nobly with thy love Cor IV.v.114
As euer in Ambitious strength, I didAs ever in ambitious strength I did Cor IV.v.115
Contend against thy Valour. Know thou first,Contend against thy valour. Know thou first,contend (v.)fight, engage in combat, struggleCor IV.v.116
I lou'd the Maid I married: neuer manI loved the maid I married; never man Cor IV.v.117
Sigh'd truer breath. But that I see thee heereSighed truer breath. But that I see thee here, Cor IV.v.118
Thou Noble thing, more dances my rapt heart,Thou noble thing, more dances my rapt heartrapt (adj.)enraptured, entranced, thrilledCor IV.v.119
dance (v.)set dancing, excite, rouse
Then when I first my wedded Mistris sawThan when I first my wedded mistress saw Cor IV.v.120
Bestride my Threshold. Why, thou Mars I tell thee,Bestride my threshold. Why, thou Mars, I tell theeMars (n.)Roman god of warCor IV.v.121
bestride (v.)stride across, step across
We haue a Power on foote: and I had purposeWe have a power on foot, and I had purposepower (n.)armed force, troops, host, armyCor IV.v.122
purpose (n.)intention, aim, plan
Once more to hew thy Target from thy Brawne,Once more to hew thy target from thy brawn,target (n.)light round shieldCor IV.v.123
brawn (n.)
old form: Brawne
muscular arm, sturdy limb
Or loose mine Arme for't: Thou hast beate mee outOr lose mine arm for't. Thou hast beat me outout (adv.)fully, completely, outright, totallyCor IV.v.124
Twelue seuerall times, and I haue nightly sinceTwelve several times, and I have nightly sinceseveral (adj.)
old form: seuerall
separate, different, distinct
Cor IV.v.125
Dreamt of encounters 'twixt thy selfe and me:Dreamt of encounters 'twixt thyself and me –  Cor IV.v.126
We haue beene downe together in my sleepe,We have been down together in my sleep, Cor IV.v.127
Vnbuckling Helmes, fisting each others Throat,Unbuckling helms, fisting each other's throat – helm (n.)
old form: Helmes
helmet
Cor IV.v.128
And wak'd halfe dead with nothing. Worthy Martius,And waked half dead with nothing. Worthy Martius, Cor IV.v.129
Had we no other quarrell else to Rome, but thatHad we no quarrel else to Rome but that Cor IV.v.130
Thou art thence Banish'd, we would muster allThou art thence banished, we would muster all Cor IV.v.131
From twelue, to seuentie: and powring WarreFrom twelve to seventy, and pouring war Cor IV.v.132
Into the bowels of vngratefull Rome,Into the bowels of ungrateful Rome, Cor IV.v.133
Like a bold Flood o're-beate. Oh come, go in,Like a bold flood o'erbear't. O, come, go in,overbear (v.)
old form: o're-beate
overwhelm, overcome, overpower
Cor IV.v.134
And take our Friendly Senators by'th' handsAnd take our friendly senators by th' hands, Cor IV.v.135
Who now are heere, taking their leaues of mee,Who now are here, taking their leaves of me Cor IV.v.136
Who am prepar'd against your Territories,Who am prepared against your territories, Cor IV.v.137
Though not for Rome it selfe.Though not for Rome itself. Cor IV.v.138.1
Corio. CORIOLANUS 
You blesse me Gods.You bless me, gods! Cor IV.v.138.2
Auf. AUFIDIUS 
Therefore most absolute Sir, if thou wilt haueTherefore, most absolute sir, if thou wilt haveabsolute (adj.)perfect, complete, incomparableCor IV.v.139
The leading of thine owne Reuenges, takeThe leading of thine own revenges, take Cor IV.v.140
Th'one halfe of my Commission, and set downeTh' one half of my commission, and set down – set down (v.)
old form: downe
resolve, decide, determine
Cor IV.v.141
commission (n.)command, authority, power
As best thou art experienc'd, since thou know'stAs best thou art experienced, since thou know'st Cor IV.v.142
Thy Countries strength and weaknesse, thine own waiesThy country's strength and weakness – thine own ways, Cor IV.v.143
Whether to knocke against the Gates of Rome,Whether to knock against the gates of Rome, Cor IV.v.144
Or rudely visit them in parts remote,Or rudely visit them in parts remoterudely (adv.)violently, roughly, with great forceCor IV.v.145
To fright them, ere destroy. But come in,To fright them ere destroy. But come infright (v.), past form frightedfrighten, scare, terrifyCor IV.v.146
Let me commend thee first, to those that shallLet me commend thee first to those that shallcommend (v.)present, introduce, bring [for favourable acceptance]Cor IV.v.147
Say yea to thy desires. A thousand welcomes,Say yea to thy desires. A thousand welcomes! Cor IV.v.148
And more a Friend, then ere an Enemie,And more a friend than e'er an enemy; Cor IV.v.149
Yet Martius that was much. Your hand: most welcome.Yet, Martius, that was much. Your hand. Most welcome! Cor IV.v.150
Exeunt Exeunt Cor IV.v.150
Enter two of the Seruingmen.First and Second Servingmen come forward Cor IV.v.151
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Heere's a strange alteration?Here's a strange alteration! Cor IV.v.151
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
By my hand, I had thoght toBy my hand, I had thought to Cor IV.v.152
haue stroken him with a Cudgell, and yet my minde gauehave strucken him with a cudgel, and yet my mind gavegive (v.)
old form: gaue
suggest, prompt, intimate
Cor IV.v.153
me, his cloathes made a false report of him.me his clothes made a false report of him.false (adj.)wrong, mistakenCor IV.v.154
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
What an Arme he has, he turn'd meWhat an arm he has! He turned me Cor IV.v.155
about with his finger and his thumbe, as one would set vpabout with his finger and his thumb as one would set upset up (v.)
old form: vp
set spinning
Cor IV.v.156
a Top.a top. Cor IV.v.157
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Nay, I knew by his face thatNay, I knew by his face that Cor IV.v.158
there was some-thing in him. He had sir, a kinde of facethere was something in him. He had, sir, a kind of face, Cor IV.v.159
me thought, I cannot tell how to tearme it.methought – I cannot tell how to term it.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: me thought
it seems / seemed to me
Cor IV.v.160
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
He had so, looking as it were,He had so, looking as it were –  Cor IV.v.161
would I were hang'd but I thought there was more inWould I were hanged, but I thought there was more in Cor IV.v.162
him, then I could think.him than I could think. Cor IV.v.163
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
So did I, Ile be sworne: He is So did I, I'll be sworn. He is Cor IV.v.164
simply the rarest man i'th' world.simply the rarest man i'th' world.rare (adj.)marvellous, splendid, excellentCor IV.v.165
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
I thinke he is: but a greater soldierI think he is. But a greater soldier Cor IV.v.166
then he, / You wot one.than he you wot one. Cor IV.v.167
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Who my Master?Who, my master? Cor IV.v.168
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Nay, it's no matter for that.Nay, it's no matter for that. Cor IV.v.169
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Worth six on him.Worth six on him. Cor IV.v.170
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Nay not so neither: but I take himNay, not so neither. But I take him Cor IV.v.171
to be the greater Souldiour.to be the greater soldier. Cor IV.v.172
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Faith looke you, one cannot tellFaith, look you, one cannot tell Cor IV.v.173
how to say that: for the Defence of a Towne, our Generallhow to say that. For the defence of a town our general Cor IV.v.
is excellent.is excellent. Cor IV.v.174
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
I, and for an assault too.Ay, and for an assault too. Cor IV.v.175
Enter the third Seruingman.Enter the Third Servingman Cor IV.v.176
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Oh Slaues, I can tell you Newes,O slaves, I can tell you news –  Cor IV.v.176
News you Rascalsnews, you rascals! Cor IV.v.178
Both. BOTH 
What, what, what? Let's partake.What, what, what? Let's partake. Cor IV.v.179
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
I would not be a Roman of allI would not be a Roman, of all Cor IV.v.180
Nations; I had as liue be a condemn'd man.nations. I had as lief be a condemned man.lief, had as
old form: liue
should like just as much
Cor IV.v.181
Both. BOTH 
Wherefore? Wherefore?Wherefore? Wherefore? Cor IV.v.182
3THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Why here's he that was wont toWhy, here's he that was wont to Cor IV.v.183
thwacke our Generall, Caius Martius.thwack our general, Caius Martius. Cor IV.v.184
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Why do you say, thwacke ourWhy do you say ‘ thwack our Cor IV.v.185
Generall?General?’ Cor IV.v.186
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
I do not say thwacke our Generall,I do not say ‘thwack our general', Cor IV.v.187
but he was alwayes good enough for himbut he was always good enough for him. Cor IV.v.188
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Come we are fellowes and friends:Come, we are fellows and friends. Cor IV.v.189
he was euer too hard for him, I haue heard him say soHe was ever too hard for him, I have heard him say sohard (adj.)strong, tough, powerfulCor IV.v.190
himselfe.himself. Cor IV.v.191
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
He was too hard for him directly,He was too hard for him, directlydirectly (adv.)straightforwardly, rightly, without evasionCor IV.v.192
to say the Troth on't before Corioles, he scotcht him,to say the truth on't. Before Corioles he scotched himscotch (v.)
old form: scotcht
slash, cut, gash
Cor IV.v.193
and notcht him like a Carbinado.and notched him like a carbonado.carbonado, carbinado (n.)grilled piece of meatCor IV.v.194
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
And hee had bin Cannibally giuen,An he had been cannibally given,give (v.)
old form: giuen
dispose, mind, incline
Cor IV.v.195
and, an (conj.)if, whether
cannibally (adv.)in the manner of a cannibal
hee might haue boyld and eaten him too.he might have boiled and eaten him too. Cor IV.v.196
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
But more of thy Newes.But more of thy news! Cor IV.v.197
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Why he is so made on heere within,Why, he is so made on here withinmake on (v.)make much ofCor IV.v.198
as if hee were Son and Heire to Mars, set at vpper endas if he were son and heir to Mars; set at upper end Cor IV.v.199
o'th' Table: No question askt him by any of the Senators,o'th' table; no question asked him by any of the senators Cor IV.v.200
but they stand bald before him. Our Generall himselfebut they stand bald before him. Our general himselfbald (adj.)bare-headed [as a sign of respect]Cor IV.v.201
makes a Mistris of him, Sanctifies himselfe with's hand,makes a mistress of him, sanctifies himself with's hand, Cor IV.v.202
and turnes vp the white o'th' eye to his Discourse. But theand turns up the white o'th' eye to his discourse. But the Cor IV.v.203
bottome of the Newes is, our Generall is cut i'th' middle, &bottom of the news is, our general is cut i'th' middle andbottom (n.)
old form: bottome
essence, gist, main point
Cor IV.v.204
but one halfe of what he was yesterday. For the other ha'sbut one half of what he was yesterday, for the other has Cor IV.v.205
halfe, by the intreaty and graunt of the whole Table. Hee'lhalf by the entreaty and grant of the whole table. He'll Cor IV.v.206
go he sayes, and sole the Porter of Rome Gates by th' eares.go, he says, and sowl the porter of Rome gates by th' ears.sowl (v.)
old form: sole
pull, lug, seize roughly
Cor IV.v.207
He will mowe all downe before him, and leaue his passageHe will mow all down before him, and leave his passage Cor IV.v.208
poul'd.polled.polled (adj.)
old form: poul'd
shorn, cleared, stripped bare
Cor IV.v.209
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
And he's as like to do't, as anyAnd he's as like to do't as anylike (adv.)likely, probable / probablyCor IV.v.210
man I can imagine.man I can imagine. Cor IV.v.211
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Doo't? he will doo't: for look you Do't! He will do't, for look you, Cor IV.v.212
sir, he has as many Friends as Enemies: which Friends sir, he has as many friends as enemies; which friends, Cor IV.v.213
sir as it were, durst not (looke you sir) shew themseluessir, as it were, durst not – look you, sir – show themselves, Cor IV.v.214
(as we terme it) his Friends, whilest he's in Directitude.as we term it, his friends whilst he's in directitude.directitude (n.)[humorous nonsense word; unclear meaning] discreditCor IV.v.215
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Directitude? What's that?Directitude? What's that? Cor IV.v.216
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
But when they shall see sir, hisBut when they shall see, sir, his Cor IV.v.217
Crest vp againe, and the man in blood, they will out of theircrest up again and the man in blood, they will out of theirblood, in[hunting] full of life, in fine conditionCor IV.v.218
crest (n.)[on an animal head or neck] ridge of feathers, ridge of hairs; hackles
Burroughes (like Conies after Raine) and reuell all with him.burrows like conies after rain, and revel all with him.cony (n.)rabbitCor IV.v.219
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
But when goes this forward:But when goes this forward? Cor IV.v.220
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
To morrow, to day, presently, you Tomorrow, today, presently. Youpresently (adv.)after a short time, soon, before longCor IV.v.221
shall haue the Drum strooke vp this afternoone: 'Tis as itshall have the drum struck up this afternoon. 'Tis as it Cor IV.v.222
were a parcel of their Feast, and to be executed ere theywere a parcel of their feast, and to be executed ere theyexecute (v.)carry out, fulfil, performCor IV.v.223
parcel (n.)part, piece, portion, bit
wipe their lips.wipe their lips. Cor IV.v.224
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
Why then wee shall haue a stirringWhy, then we shall have a stirring Cor IV.v.225
World againe: / This peace is nothing, but to rust Iron,world again. This peace is nothing but to rust iron, Cor IV.v.226
encrease Taylors, / and breed Ballad-makers.increase tailors, and breed ballad-makers. Cor IV.v.227
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
Let me haue Warre say I, it exceedsLet me have war, say I. It exceeds Cor IV.v.228
peace as farre as day do's night: It's sprightly walking,peace as far as day does night. It's spritely walking, Cor IV.v.229
audible, and full of Vent. Peace, is a very Apoplexy,audible, and full of vent. Peace is a very apoplexy,vent (n.)[of a hunted animal] scentCor IV.v.230
apoplexy (n.)paralysis, torpor, total breakdown
Lethargie, mull'd, deafe, sleepe, insensible, a getter oflethargy; mulled, deaf, sleepy, insensible; a getter ofmulled (adj.)
old form: mull'd
stupefied, dull, numb
Cor IV.v.231
getter (n.)begetter
more bastard Children, then warres a destroyer of men.more bastard children than war's a destroyer of men. Cor IV.v.232
2 SECOND SERVINGMAN 
'Tis so, and as warres in some sort'Tis so. And as wars in some sortsort (n.)way, mannerCor IV.v.233
may be saide to be a Rauisher, so it cannot be denied, butmay be said to be a ravisher, so it cannot be denied but Cor IV.v.234
peace is a great maker of Cuckolds.peace is a great maker of cuckolds.cuckold (n.)[mocking name] man with an unfaithful wifeCor IV.v.235
1 FIRST SERVINGMAN 
I, and it makes men hate oneAy, and it makes men hate one Cor IV.v.236
another.another. Cor IV.v.237
3 THIRD SERVINGMAN 
Reason, because they then lesseReason: because they then less Cor IV.v.238
neede one another: / The Warres for my money. I hope to seeneed one another. The wars for my money. I hope to see Cor IV.v.239
Romanes as cheape as Volcians. They are rising, they areRomans as cheap as Volscians. They are rising, they are Cor IV.v.240
rising.rising. Cor IV.v.241
Both. BOTH 
In, in, in, in.In, in, in, in. Cor IV.v.242
Exeunt Cor IV.v.242
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