The Two Noble Kinsmen


Text

Act I
Act II
Act III
Act IV
Act V

Enter Doctor, Gaoler, and Wooer in habit of Palamon
habit (n.) 1 dress, clothing, costume See Topics: Frequency count


DOCTOR

Has this advice I told you done any good upon her?


WOOER

O, very much. The maids that kept her company

Have half persuaded her that I am Palamon;

Within this half hour she came smiling to me,

And asked me what I would eat, and when I would kiss her.

I told her, presently, and kissed her twice.
presently (adv.) 1 immediately, instantly, at once See Topics: Frequency count


DOCTOR

'Twas well done; twenty times had been far better,

For there the cure lies mainly.
mainly (adv.) 2 entirely, completely, totally


WOOER

                         Then she told me

She would watch with me tonight, for well she knew
watch (v.) 1 stay awake, keep vigil

What hour my fit would take me.
fit (n.) 1 fever, attack, seizure


DOCTOR

                         Let her do so,

And when your fit comes, fit her home, and presently.
fit (v.) 4 supply [with what is fit], satisfy
home (adv.) 1 fully, thoroughly, unsparingly
presently (adv.) 1 immediately, instantly, at once See Topics: Frequency count


WOOER

She would have me sing.


DOCTOR

                         You did so?


WOOER

                                                         No.


DOCTOR

'Twas very ill done, then;
ill (adv.) 1 badly, adversely, unfavourably See Topics: Frequency count

You should observe her every way.
observe (v.) 1 humour, gratify, indulge


WOOER

                         Alas,

I have no voice, sir, to confirm her that way.
confirm (v.) encourage, strengthen, make firm


DOCTOR

That's all one, if ye make a noise.
all is one; that's / it's all one it makes no difference, it's one and the same, it doesn't matter See Topics: Discourse markers
if (conj.) 1 as long as

If she entreat again, do anything;

Lie with her if she ask you.


GAOLER

                         Ho there, doctor!


DOCTOR

Yes, in the way of cure.


GAOLER

                         But first, by your leave,

I'th' way of honesty.
honesty (n.) 1 virtue, chastity
niceness (n.) coyness, fastidiousness, excessive scruple


DOCTOR

                         That's but a niceness.

Ne'er cast your child away for honesty;
cast away (v.) 2 ruin, waste carelessly, squander
honesty (n.) 1 virtue, chastity

Cure her first this way, then if she will be honest,
honest (adj.) 1 chaste, pure, virtuous

She has the path before her.
path (n.) way, course of action


GAOLER

                         Thank ye, doctor.


DOCTOR

Pray bring her in and let's see how she is.


GAOLER

I will, and tell her her Palamon stays for her.
stay for (v.) wait for, await

But, doctor, methinks you are i'th' wrong still.

Exit
methinks(t), methought(s) (v.) it seems /seemed to me See Topics: Frequency count


DOCTOR

                         Go, go.

You fathers are fine fools! Her honesty?
honesty (n.) 1 virtue, chastity

An we should give her physic till we find that –
physic (n.) 1 medicine, healing, treatment See Topics: Frequency count


WOOER

Why, do you think she is not honest, sir?
honest (adj.) 1 chaste, pure, virtuous


DOCTOR

How old is she?


WOOER

                         She's eighteen.


DOCTOR

                                                         She may be –

But that's all one, 'tis nothing to our purpose.
all is one; that's / it's all one it makes no difference, it's one and the same, it doesn't matter See Topics: Discourse markers
nothing (n.) 3 insignificance, unimportance, triviality
purpose (n.) 1 intention, aim, plan See Topics: Frequency count

Whate'er her father says, if you perceive

Her mood inclining that way that I spoke of,

Videlicet, the way of flesh – you have me?
have (v.) 1 understand, grasp, comprehend


WOOER

Yet very well, sir.


DOCTOR

                         Please her appetite,

And do it home; it cures her ipso facto
home (adv.) 1 fully, thoroughly, unsparingly
ipso... by itself See Topics: Latin

The melancholy humour that infects her.
humour (n.) 1 mood, disposition, frame of mind, temperament [as determined by bodily fluids] See Topics: Frequency count


WOOER

I am of your mind, doctor.

Enter Gaoler, Gaoler's Daughter, and her maid


DOCTOR

You'll find it so. She comes; pray humour her.


GAOLER

Come, your love Palamon stays for you, child,

And has done this long hour, to visit you.


DAUGHTER

I thank him for his gentle patience;
gentle (adj.) 2 courteous, friendly, kind

He's a kind gentleman, and I am much bound to him.
bound (adj.) 1 obliged, indebted, under an obligation

Did you ne'er see the horse he gave me?


GAOLER

                         Yes.


DAUGHTER

How do you like him?
fair (adj.) 1 handsome, good-looking, beautiful


GAOLER

                         He's a very fair one.


DAUGHTER

You never saw him dance?


GAOLER

                         No.


DAUGHTER

                                                         I have often.

He dances very finely, very comely,
comely (adv.) gracefully, fittingly, decorously

And for a jig, come cut and long tail to him,
come cut and long tail [whether a horse or dog has its tail docked or not] whatever happens, come what may

He turns ye like a top.


GAOLER

                         That's fine indeed.


DAUGHTER

He'll dance the morris twenty mile an hour,
morris (n.) morris dance

And that will founder the best hobby-horse,
founder (v.) make lame, cause to break down

If I have any skill, in all the parish;
skill (n.) 3 judgement, knowledge, common sense

And gallops to the tune of ‘ Light o' Love.’

What think you of this horse?
virtue (n.) 1 quality, accomplishment, ability


GAOLER

                         Having these virtues,

I think he might be brought to play at tennis.
bring (v.) 4 train, bring up, rear


DAUGHTER

Alas, that's nothing.


GAOLER

                         Can he write and read too?


DAUGHTER

A very fair hand, and casts himself th' accounts
cast (v.) 1 calculate, reckon, estimate
fair (adj.) 2 good, elegant, fine
hand (n.) 5 handwriting

Of all his hay and provender; that ostler
provender (n.) feed, fodder

Must rise betime that cozens him. You know
betime (adv.) 1 early, at an early hour
cozen (v.) cheat, dupe, trick, deceive
rise (v.) 1 get up, get out of bed

The chestnut mare the Duke has?


GAOLER

                         Very well.


DAUGHTER

She is horribly in love with him, poor beast,

But he is like his master, coy and scornful.
coy (adj.) 2 unresponsive, distant, standoffish, disdainful


GAOLER

What dowry has she?
bottle (n.) 1 bundle, truss [of hay]


DAUGHTER

                         Some two hundred bottles,

And twenty strike of oats; but he'll ne'er have her.
strike (n.) measure [of variable value - usually, a bushel]

He lisps in's neighing able to entice

A miller's mare. He'll be the death of her.


DOCTOR

What stuff she utters!
stuff (n.) 3 rubbish, nonsense


GAOLER

Make curtsy, here your love comes.


WOOER

(comes forward)

                         Pretty soul,

How do ye? That's a fine maid; there's a curtsy!


DAUGHTER

Yours to command i'th' way of honesty.
honesty (n.) 1 virtue, chastity

How far is't now to th' end o'th' world, my masters?


DOCTOR

Why, a day's journey, wench.


DAUGHTER

(to Wooer)
wench (n.) girl, lass See Topics: Frequency count

                         Will you go with me?


WOOER

What shall we do there, wench?
stool-ball (n.) type of bat-and-ball game, with a stool in place of a wicket


DAUGHTER

                         Why, play at stool-ball.

What is there else to do?
content (adj.) 1 agreeable, willing, ready See Topics: Frequency count


WOOER

                         I am content,

If we shall keep our wedding there.
keep (v.) 12 celebrate, solemnize


DAUGHTER

                         'Tis true;

For there, I will assure you, we shall find

Some blind priest for the purpose, that will venture

To marry us, for here they are nice and foolish.
nice (adj.) 1 fastidious, particular, fussy, overscrupulous

Besides, my father must be hanged tomorrow,

And that would be a blot i'th' business.

Are not you Palamon?


WOOER

                         Do not you know me?


DAUGHTER

Yes, but you care not for me; I have nothing

But this poor petticoat and too coarse smocks.
petticoat (n.) long skirt See Topics: Clothing
smock (n.) woman's undergarment, shift, slip, chemise


WOOER

That's all one; I will have you.
all is one; that's / it's all one it makes no difference, it's one and the same, it doesn't matter See Topics: Discourse markers


DAUGHTER

                         Will you surely?


WOOER

Yes, by this fair hand will I.


DAUGHTER

                         We'll to bed then.


WOOER

E'en when you will.

He kisses her
fain (adv.) gladly, willingly See Topics: Frequency count


DAUGHTER

                         O sir, you would fain be nibbling.


WOOER

Why do you rub my kiss off?


DAUGHTER

                         'Tis a sweet one,

And will perfume me finely against the wedding.

Is not this your cousin Arcite?


DOCTOR

                         Yes, sweetheart,

And I am glad my cousin Palamon

Has made so fair a choice.


DAUGHTER

                         Do you think he'll have me?


DOCTOR

Yes, without doubt.


DAUGHTER

                         Do you think so too?


GAOLER

                                                         Yes.


DAUGHTER

We shall have many children. – Lord, how you're grown!

My Palamon I hope will grow too, finely,

Now he's at liberty. Alas, poor chicken,
chicken (n.) child, little one

He was kept down with hard meat and ill lodging;
hard (adj.) 5 bad, poor, inadequate
ill (adj.) 3 poor, inadequate, miserable
keep down (v.) prevent from growing, keep small
meat (n.) 1 food, nourishment

But I'll kiss him up again.

Enter a Messenger
lose (v.) 4 miss, lose out on, be deprived of


MESSENGER

What do you here? You'll lose the noblest sight

That e'er was seen.
field (n.) 2 duelling place


GAOLER

                         Are they i'th' field?


MESSENGER

                                                         They are.

You bear a charge there too.
bear (v.), past forms bore, borne 2 carry on, manage, conduct [an affair]
charge (n.) 3 task, responsibility, duty
straight (adv.) straightaway, immediately, at once See Topics: Frequency count


GAOLER

                         I'll away straight.

I must e'en leave you here.


DOCTOR

                         Nay, we'll go with you.

I will not lose the fight.
like (v.) 3 find, think of
lose (v.) 4 miss, lose out on, be deprived of


GAOLER

                         How did you like her?


DOCTOR

I'll warrant you, within these three or four days
warrant (v.) 1 assure, promise, guarantee, confirm See Topics: Frequency count

I'll make her right again. (To Wooer) You must not from her,

But still preserve her in this way.
preserve (v.) keep, maintain, look after
still (adv.) 1 constantly, always, continually See Topics: Frequency count


WOOER

                         I will.


DOCTOR

Let's get her in.


WOOER

                         Come, sweet, we'll go to dinner,

And then we'll play at cards.


DAUGHTER

                         And shall we kiss too?


WOOER

A hundred times.
twenty, and [ballad catch phrase, used as an intensifer] and many more See Topics: Numbers


DAUGHTER

                          – And twenty.


WOOER

                                                         Ay, and twenty.


DAUGHTER

And then we'll sleep together.


DOCTOR

                         Take her offer.


WOOER

Yes, marry, will we.


DAUGHTER

                         But you shall not hurt me.


WOOER

I will not, sweet.


DAUGHTER

                         If you do, love, I'll cry.

Exeunt

 
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