ill (n.) 1
wrong, injury, harm, evil
1H6 II.v.129 [Richard alone] make my ill th'advantage of my good [F: will]
1H6 III.iii.65 [Pucelle to Burgundy] When Talbot ... fashioned thee that instrument of ill
2H6 I.ii.19 [Gloucester to Duchess] when I imagine ill / Against my king and nephew
AC I.ii.130 [Antony alone] Ten thousand harms, more than the ills I know / My idleness doth hatch
Cor III.i.161 [Coriolanus to Brutus, of the state] th'ill which doth control't
H5 IV.i.181 [Williams to disguised King Henry] every man that dies ill, the ill upon his own head [second instance]
Ham V.i.47 [First Clown to Second Clown The gallows does well. But how does it well? It does well to those that do ill.
KJ III.i.272 [Cardinal Pandulph to King Philip] being not done, where doing tends to ill, / The truth is then most done not doing it
LC 156 [] who ever shunned by precedent, / The destined ill she must herself assay
LLL II.i.58 [Katharine to Princess, of Dumaine] Most power to do most harm, least knowing ill
LLL IV.i.35 [Princess to all] I for praise alone now seek to spill / The poor deer's blood, that my heart means no ill
LLL IV.iii.122 [Dumaine to himself] Ill, to example ill, / Would from my forehead wipe a perjured note
Luc 1207 [] My blood shall wash the slander of mine ill
Luc 1244 [of the oppressed] call them not the authors of their ill
Luc 304 [of doors opened by Tarquin] they all rate his ill
Luc 380 [of Tarquin's eyes] had they in that darksome prison died, / Then had they seen the period of their ill!
Luc 476 [of Lucrece talking to Tarquin] she ... urgeth still / Under what colour he commits this ill
Luc 91 [of Tarquin] Whose inward ill no outward harm expressed
Luc 996 [Lucrece as if totime] Teach me to curse him that thou taught'st this ill
MA II.i.139 [Beatrice to Benedick, of following the leaders in a dance] if they lead to any ill, I will leave them at the next turning
MV II.v.17 [Shylock to Launcelot] There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest
MW IV.i.60 [Mistress Quickly to Evans, of some Latin words] You do ill to teach the child such words
Oth IV.iii.102 [Emilia to Desdemona, of husbands] The ills we do, their ills instruct us so
Per I.i.105 [Pericles to Antiochus] if Jove stray, who dares say Jove doth ill?
Per I.i.78 [Pericles to himself, of Antiochus' daughter] I loved you, and could still, / Were not this glorious casket stored with ill
R2 I.i.86 [King Richard to Bolingbroke, of an accusation against Mowbray] It must be great that can inherit us / So much as of a thought of ill in him
R2 I.iii.189 [King Richard to Bolingbroke and Mowbray] never ... plot, contrive, or complot any ill / 'Gainst us
RJ IV.v.94 [Friar to all] The heavens do lour upon you for some ill
Sonn 119.9 [] O benefit of ill, now I find true / That better is, by evil still made better
Sonn 40.13 [] Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows
Sonn 57.14 [] So true a fool is love, that in your will, / Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill
Sonn 66.12 [] captive good attending captain ill
Sonn 70.13 [] If some suspect of ill masked not thy show, / Then thou alone kingdoms of hearts shouldst owe
Tem I.ii.353 [Miranda to and of Caliban] Being capable of all ill
Tim III.v.38 [First Senator to Alcibiades] What folly 'tis to hazard life for ill!
Tit V.i.127 [Aaron to all] Few come within the compass of my curse - / Wherein I did not some notorious ill

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